Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mutat Res. 1999 Mar 8;424(1-2):83-95.

Lipid peroxidation-DNA damage by malondialdehyde.

Author information

1
A.B. Hancock Jr. Memorial Laboratory for Cancer Research Center in Molecular Toxicology, Vanderbilt Cancer Center, Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN 37232, USA. marnett@toxicology.mc.vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

Malondialdehyde is a naturally occurring product of lipid peroxidation and prostaglandin biosynthesis that is mutagenic and carcinogenic. It reacts with DNA to form adducts to deoxyguanosine and deoxyadenosine. The major adduct to DNA is a pyrimidopurinone called M1G. Site-specific mutagenesis experiments indicate that M1G is mutagenic in bacteria and is repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. M1G has been detected in liver, white blood cells, pancreas, and breast from healthy human beings at levels ranging from 1-120 per 108 nucleotides. Several different assays for M1G have been described that are based on mass spectrometry, 32P-postlabeling, or immunochemical techniques. Each technique offers advantages and disadvantages based on a combination of sensitivity and specificity. Application of each of these techniques to the analysis of M1G is reviewed and future needs for improvements are identified. M1G appears to be a major endogenous DNA adduct in human beings that may contribute significantly to cancer linked to lifestyle and dietary factors. High throughput methods for its detection and quantitation will be extremely useful for screening large populations.

PMID:
10064852
DOI:
10.1016/s0027-5107(99)00010-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center