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Bull World Health Organ. 1999;77(1):3-14.

Mumps and mumps vaccine: a global review.

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1
National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland.

Abstract

Mumps is an acute infectious disease caused by a paramyxovirus. Although the disease is usually mild, up to 10% of patients can develop aseptic meningitis; a less common but more serious complication is encephalitis, which can result in death or disability. Permanent deafness, orchitis, and pancreatitis are other untoward effects of mumps. Based on data reported to WHO up to April 1998, mumps vaccine is routinely used by national immunization programmes in 82 countries/areas: 23 (92%) of 25 developed countries, 19 (86%) of 22 countries with economies in transition (mainly the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union), and 40 (24%) of 168 developing countries. Countries that have achieved high coverage have shown a rapid decline in mumps morbidity. Furthermore, in many of these countries, mumps-associated encephalitis and deafness have nearly vanished. This review considers the disease burden due to mumps; summarizes studies on the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of different strains of mumps vaccine; and highlights lessons learned about implementing mumps immunization in different countries. Countries already using mumps vaccine should monitor immunization coverage and establish routine mumps surveillance with investigation of outbreaks. Where mumps is targeted for elimination, countries need to add a second dose of mumps vaccine for children, keeping in mind that the disease may still occur in susceptible adults.

PIP:

Mumps is an acute infectious disease caused by a paramyxovirus. While the disease is usually mild, up to 10% of patients can develop aseptic meningitis. A less common but more serious complication is encephalitis, which can result in death or disability. Permanent deafness, orchitis, and pancreatitis are other adverse effects of mumps. Based upon data reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) up to April 1998, mumps vaccine is routinely used by national immunization programs in 82 countries/areas: 23 of 25 developed countries, 19 of 22 countries with economies in transition, and 40 of 168 developing countries. Countries which have achieved high vaccine coverage have realized a rapid decline in mumps morbidity. Also in many such countries, mumps-associated encephalitis and deafness have almost vanished. The authors consider the disease burden due to mumps; summarize studies on the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of different strains of mumps vaccine; and note lessons learned about implementing mumps immunization in different countries. Countries already using mumps vaccine should monitor immunization coverage and establish routine mumps surveillance with investigation of outbreaks. Where mumps is targeted to be eliminated, countries need to add a second dose of mumps vaccine for children.

PMID:
10063655
PMCID:
PMC2557572
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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