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Dev Biol. 1999 Mar 1;207(1):62-75.

Cloning and functional studies of a novel gene aberrantly expressed in RB-deficient embryos.

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  • 1Department of Molecular Medicine/Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78245, USA.

Abstract

The tumor suppressor RB regulates diverse cellular processes such as G1/S transition, cell differentiation, and cell survival. Indeed, Rb-knockout mice exhibit phenotypes including ectopic mitosis, defective differentiation, and extensive apoptosis in the neurons. Using differential display, a novel gene, Rig-1, was isolated based on its elevated expression in the hindbrain and spinal cord of Rb-knockout embryos. The longest open reading frame of Rig-1 encoded a polypeptide that consists of a putative extracellular segment with five immunoglobulin-like domains and three fibronectin III-like domains, a putative transmembrane domain, and a distinct intracellular segment. The Rig-1 sequence was 40% identical to the recently identified roundabout protein. Consistent with the predicted transmembrane nature of the protein, Rig-1 protein was present in the membranous fraction. Antisera raised against the putative extracellular and intracellular segments of Rig-1 reacted with an approximately 210-kDa protein in mouse embryonic CNS. Rig-1 mRNA was transiently expressed in the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Elevated levels of Rig-1 mRNA and protein were found in Rb-/- embryos. Ectopic expression of a transmembrane form of Rig-1, but not the secreted form, promoted neuronal cell entrance to S phase and repressed the expression of a marker of differentiated neuron, Talpha1 tubulin. Thus Rig-1, a possible distant relative of roundabout, may mediate some of the pleiotropic roles of RB in the developing neurons.

PMID:
10049565
DOI:
10.1006/dbio.1998.9141
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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