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Surg Neurol. 1999 Feb;51(2):117-24; discussion 124-8.

Optimal clip application and intraoperative angiography for intracranial aneurysms.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois 60153, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The actual incidence of residual aneurysm after clipping is unknown. The natural history of residual aneurysm can be regrowth and hemorrhage. Intraoperative angiography offers a cost-effective, safe interdiction to the problem of residual aneurysm and parent vessel stenosis.

METHODS/RESULTS:

Forty consecutive patients harboring 54 aneurysms underwent 42 operative procedures to clip 52 aneurysms, during which 220 intraoperative angiographic runs were performed. Ninety-three percent of the procedures were performed on patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. There were 4 giant (>2.5 cm, 4/52 = 8%, all anterior circulation), 21 large (1.0-2.5 cm, 21/52 = 40%, 16/ 21 = 76% anterior circulation, 6/21 = 28% posterior circulation), and 27 small (<1.0 cm, 27/52-52%, 22/27 = 81% anterior circulation, 5/27 = 18% posterior circulation) aneurysms. Intraoperative angiography led to clip adjustment in 18/52 = 34% of aneurysms (4/18 = 22% for parent artery stenosis, 8/18 = 44% for residual aneurysm and 6/18 = 33% for both). Of the 18 adjustments made, 16 = 88% were made on giant or large aneurysms and two were small (one was a complex anterior communicating and one was a vertebral junction aneurysm). Follow-up angiography was performed on 26/42 = 62% of operative cases. Postoperative angiography confirmed intraoperative angiography in all cases. Two complications occurred during 220 angiographic runs: one embolic stroke and one incident of equipment failure.

CONCLUSION:

A grading scale was applied to test the relationship between anatomical site and size as they relate to the necessity for clip adjustment for complete aneurysm obliteration and/or parent artery compromise. Significance was related to site (basilar bifurcation, anterior communicating, middle cerebral bifurcation, and ophthalmic) and size (>1.0 cm), both as independent and codependent variables. An analysis of the cost-effectiveness of intraoperative angiography was demonstrated.

PMID:
10029414
DOI:
10.1016/s0090-3019(97)00529-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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