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Heart. 1999 Mar;81(3):245-7.

Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae, or cytomegalovirus: population based study of coronary heart disease.

Author information

1
Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK. john.danesh@balliol.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study possible associations between coronary heart disease and serological evidence of persistent infection with Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae, or cytomegalovirus.

DESIGN:

Population based, case-control study, nested within a randomised trial.

SETTING:

Five general practices in Bedfordshire, UK.

INDIVIDUALS:

288 patients with incident or prevalent coronary heart disease and 704 age and sex matched controls.

RESULTS:

High concentrations of serum IgG antibodies to H pylori were present in 54% of cases v 46% of controls, with corresponding results for C pneumoniae seropositivity (33% v 33%), and cytomegalovirus seropositivity (40% v 31%). After adjustments for age, sex, smoking, indicators of socioeconomic status, and standard risk factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for coronary heart disease of seropositivity to these agents were: 1.28 (0.93 to 1.75) for H pylori, 0.95 (0.66 to 1.36) for C pneumoniae, and 1.40 (0.96 to 2. 05) for cytomegalovirus.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is no good evidence of strong associations between coronary heart disease and serological markers of persistent infection with H pylori, C pneumoniae, or cytomegalovirus. To determine the existence of moderate associations between these agents and disease, however, larger scale studies will be needed that can keep residual confounders to a minimum.

PMID:
10026344
PMCID:
PMC1728960
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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