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PLoS One. 2016 Jan 11;11(1):e0146601. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0146601. eCollection 2016.

Chemiluminescence Imaging of Superoxide Anion Detects Beta-Cell Function and Mass.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, United States of America.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, United States of America.
3
Departments of Radiology, Microbiology & Immunology, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, United States of America.

Abstract

Superoxide anion is produced during normal cellular respiration and plays key roles in cellular physiology with its dysregulation being associated with a variety of diseases. Superoxide anion is a short-lived molecule and, therefore, its homeostatic regulation and role in biology and disease requires dynamic quantification with fine temporal resolution. Here we validated coelenterazine as a reporter of intracellular superoxide anion concentration and used it as a dynamic measure both in vitro and in vivo. Chemiluminescence was dependent upon superoxide anion levels, including those produced during cellular respiration, and concentrations varied both kinetically and temporally in response to physiologically relevant fluctuations in glucose levels. In vivo imaging with coelenterazine revealed that beta cells of the pancreas have increased levels of superoxide anion, which acted as a measure of beta-cell function and mass and could predict the susceptibility of mice to diabetes mellitus. Glucose response and regulation are key elements of cellular physiology and organismal biology, and superoxide anion appears to play a fundamental and dynamic role in both of these processes.

PMID:
26752052
PMCID:
PMC4709142
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0146601
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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