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Food Chem. 2012 Jul 15;133(2):277-83. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.01.023. Epub 2012 Jan 25.

Nutritional quality and safety of cooked edible crab (Cancer pagurus).

Author information

1
Research Unit of Upgrading of Fishery and Farmed Products (U-VPPA), National Institute of Biological Resources (INRB, I.P/IPIMAR), Avenida de Brasília, 1449-006 Lisboa, Portugal.
2
Centre of Atomic Physics, University of Lisbon, Avenida Professor Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa, Portugal.
3
Research Unit of Upgrading of Fishery and Farmed Products (U-VPPA), National Institute of Biological Resources (INRB, I.P/IPIMAR), Avenida de Brasília, 1449-006 Lisboa, Portugal. Electronic address: marques_am@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Edible crab (Cancer pagurus) is one of the most important crustaceans consumed in Southern European countries, either as boiled or steamed cooked product. So far, the majority of studies assessing health benefits and risks associated to seafood consumption have been carried out in raw products, despite being generally cooked before consumption, and mostly in muscle tissue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of steaming and boiling on the chemical safety and nutritional value of C. pagurus caught in spring and summer. Generally, chemical and elemental composition of brown meat (tissue in the body cavity comprising mainly gonads and hepatopancreas) differed significantly from muscle (white meat in claws and legs). Additionally, the same tissue revealed differences in chemical and elemental composition of raw and cooked C. pagurus, likely due to water leaching. In contrast, few variations between seasons were observed. The results revealed that the consumption of cooked edible crab muscle should be promoted, whereas brown meat ingestion should be done parsimoniously.

KEYWORDS:

Boiled; Cancer pagurus; Chemical composition; Macro and trace elements; Steamed; Toxic metals

PMID:
25683396
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.01.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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