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Comp Med. 2014 Dec;64(6):456-63.

Gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome in Göttingen minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica).

Author information

1
Combined Injury Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
2
Department of Health & Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA.
3
Veterinary Sciences Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
5
Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
6
Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. maria.moroni@usuhs.edu.

Abstract

In the absence of supportive care, exposing Göttingen minipigs to γ-radiation doses of less than 2 Gy achieves lethality due to hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. Doses of 2 to 5 Gy are associated with an accelerated hematopoietic syndrome, characterized by villus blunting and fusion, the beginning of sepsis, and a mild transient reduction in plasma citrulline concentration. We exposed male Göttingen minipigs (age, 5 mo; weight, 9 to 11 kg) to γ-radiation doses of 5 to 12 Gy (total body; (60)Co, 0.6 Gy/min) to test whether these animals exhibit classic gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome (GI-ARS). After exposure, the minipigs were monitored for 10 d by using clinical signs, CBC counts, and parameters associated with the development of the gastrointestinal syndrome. Göttingen minipigs exposed to γ radiation of 5 to 12 Gy demonstrate a dose-dependent occurrence of all parameters classically associated with acute GI-ARS. These results suggest that Göttingen minipigs may be a suitable model for studying GI-ARS after total body irradiation, but the use of supportive care to extend survival beyond 10 d is recommended. This study is the first step toward determining the feasibility of using Göttingen minipigs in testing the efficacy of candidate drugs for the treatment of GI-ARS after total body irradiation.

PMID:
25527026
PMCID:
PMC4275081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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