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Eur Heart J. 2014 Sep 14;35(35):2363-71. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehu286. Epub 2014 Jul 19.

Association between clinical presentations before myocardial infarction and coronary mortality: a prospective population-based study using linked electronic records.

Author information

1
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK emily.herrett@lshtm.ac.uk.
2
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.
3
Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, London, UK.
4
University College London, London, UK Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, London, UK.
5
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ischaemia in different arterial territories before acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may influence post-AMI outcomes. No studies have evaluated prospectively collected information on ischaemia and its effect on short- and long-term coronary mortality. The objective of this study was to compare patients with and without prospectively measured ischaemic presentations before AMI in terms of infarct characteristics and coronary mortality.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

As part of the CALIBER programme, we linked data from primary care, hospital admissions, the national acute coronary syndrome registry and cause-specific mortality to identify patients with first AMI (n = 16,439). We analysed time from AMI to coronary mortality (n = 5283 deaths) using Cox regression (median 2.6 years follow-up), comparing patients with and without recent ischaemic presentations. Patients with ischaemic presentations in the 90 days before AMI experienced lower coronary mortality in the first 7 days after AMI compared with those with no prior ischaemic presentations, after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure and cardiovascular medications [HR: 0.64 (95% CI: 0.57-0.73) P < 0.001], but subsequent mortality was higher [HR: 1.42 (1.13-1.77) P = 0.001]. Patients with ischaemic presentations closer in time to AMI had the lowest seven day mortality (P-trend = 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

In the first large prospective study of ischaemic presentations prior to AMI, we have shown that those occurring closest to AMI are associated with lower short-term coronary mortality following AMI, which could represent a natural ischaemic preconditioning effect, observed in a clinical setting.

CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION:

Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01604486.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Ischaemia; Myocardial infarction

PMID:
25038774
PMCID:
PMC4163194
DOI:
10.1093/eurheartj/ehu286
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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