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Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jun;77(6):1352-60.

Riboflavin (vitamin B-2) and health.

Author information

1
Centre for Human Nutrition, The University of Sheffield, United Kingdom. h.j.powers@sheffield.ac.uk

Abstract

Riboflavin is unique among the water-soluble vitamins in that milk and dairy products make the greatest contribution to its intake in Western diets. Meat and fish are also good sources of riboflavin, and certain fruit and vegetables, especially dark-green vegetables, contain reasonably high concentrations. Biochemical signs of depletion arise within only a few days of dietary deprivation. Poor riboflavin status in Western countries seems to be of most concern for the elderly and adolescents, despite the diversity of riboflavin-rich foods available. However, discrepancies between dietary intake data and biochemical data suggest either that requirements are higher than hitherto thought or that biochemical thresholds for deficiency are inappropriate. This article reviews current evidence that diets low in riboflavin present specific health risks. There is reasonably good evidence that poor riboflavin status interferes with iron handling and contributes to the etiology of anemia when iron intakes are low. Various mechanisms for this have been proposed, including effects on the gastrointestinal tract that might compromise the handling of other nutrients. Riboflavin deficiency has been implicated as a risk factor for cancer, although this has not been satisfactorily established in humans. Current interest is focused on the role that riboflavin plays in determining circulating concentrations of homocysteine, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Other mechanisms have been proposed for a protective role of riboflavin in ischemia reperfusion injury; this requires further study. Riboflavin deficiency may exert some of its effects by reducing the metabolism of other B vitamins, notably folate and vitamin B-6.

PMID:
12791609
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/77.6.1352
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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