My NCBI Sign In
Jump to: Authorized Access | Attribution | Authorized Requests

Study Description

COLON, Colorectal Cancer: Longitudinal Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that influence colorectal tumor recurrence, survival and quality of life: The COLON study is a multi-center prospective cohort study to assess the role of diet and other lifestyle factors in cancer recurrence and survival among incident colorectal cancer patients in the Netherlands.

DACHS, Darmkrebs: Chancen der Verhütung durch Screening:This German study was initiated as a large population-based case-control study in 2003 in the Rhine-Neckar-Odenwald region (southwest region of Germany) to assess the potential of endoscopic screening for reduction of colorectal cancer risk and to investigate etiologic determinants of disease, particularly lifestyle/environmental factors and genetic factors. During an in-person interview, data were collected on demographics, medical history, family history of CRC, and various life-style factors, as were blood and mouthwash samples.

EPIC, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer: EPIC is an on-going multicenter prospective cohort study designed to investigate the associations between diet, lifestyle, genetic and environmental factors and various types of cancer.

HPFS, Health Professionals Follow-up Study: HPFS is a parallel prospective study to the NHS. The HPFS cohort comprised 51,529 men aged 40-75 who, in 1986, responded to a mailed questionnaire. Participants provided information on health related exposures, including current and past smoking history, age, weight, height, diet, physical activity, aspirin use, and family history of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer and other outcomes were reported by participants or next-of-kin and were followed up through review of the medical and pathology record by physicians. Overall, more than 97% of self-reported colorectal cancers were confirmed by medical record review. Information was abstracted on histology and primary location. Follow-up evaluation has been excellent, with 94% of the men responding to date.

NHS, Nurses' Health Study: The NHS cohort began in 1976 when 121,700 married female registered nurses age 30-55 years returned the initial questionnaire that ascertained a variety of important health-related exposures [PMID:248266]. Since 1976, follow-up questionnaires have been mailed every 2 years. Colorectal cancer and other outcomes were reported by participants or next-of-kin and followed up through review of the medical and pathology record by physicians. Overall, more than 97% of self-reported colorectal cancers were confirmed by medical-record review. Information was abstracted on histology and primary location. The rate of follow-up evaluation has been high: as a proportion of the total possible follow-up time, follow-up evaluation has been more than 92%.

NQplus, Nutrition Questionnaires plus: NQplus is a longitudinal observational study on diet and health in the general Dutch population.

  • Study Types: Case-Control, Cohort, Nested Case-Control
  • dbGaP estimated ancestry components using GRAF-pop
  • Number of study subjects that have individual level data available through Authorized Access: 8725

Authorized Access
Publicly Available Data (Public ftp)

Connect to the public download site. The site contains release notes and manifests. If available, the site also contains data dictionaries, variable summaries, documents, and truncated analyses.

Study Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria

COLON, Colorectal Cancer: Longitudinal Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that influence colorectal tumor recurrence, survival and quality of life: Patients with colorectal cancer from 11 hospitals were invited upon diagnosis. Patients with a history of colorectal cancer or (partial) bowel resection, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, or dementia were excluded from the study. At diagnosis and at several time points during follow-up, patients donated a blood sample and filled out questionnaires about diet and other lifestyle factors. Blood samples are stored in a biobank to facilitate future analyses. Information on vital status is retrieved by linkage with national registries. Information on clinical characteristics is gathered from linkage with the Netherlands Cancer Registry and with hospital databases. A total of 743 colorectal cancer samples were selected for genotyping. Matching controls were selected from the NQplus study described below.

DACHS, Darmkrebs: Chancen der Verhütung durch Screening: Cases with a first diagnosis of invasive colorectal cancer (International Classification of Diseases 10 codes C18-C20) who were at least 30 years of age (no upper age limit), German speaking, a resident in the study region, and mentally and physically able to participate in a one-hour interview, were recruited by their treating physicians either in the hospital a few days after surgery, or by mail after discharge from the hospital. Cases were confirmed based on histologic reports and hospital discharge letters following diagnosis of colorectal cancer. All hospitals treating colorectal cancer patients in the study region participated. Community-based controls were randomly selected from population registries, employing frequency matching with respect to age (5-year groups), sex, and county of residence. Controls with a history of colorectal cancer were excluded. Controls were contacted by mail and follow-up calls. In total 1268 cases and 634 matched controls were selected for genotyping.

EPIC, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer: In summary, 521,448 participants (~70% women) mostly aged 35 years or above were recruited between 1992 and 2000. Participants were recruited from 23 study centers in ten European countries. The current study included participants from France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom (UK). Blood samples were collected at baseline according to standardized procedures, and stored at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC; -196ºC, liquid nitrogen) for all countries except Sweden (-80ºC freezers). All study participants provided written informed consent. Ethical approval for the EPIC study was obtained from the review boards of IARC and local participating centers. Incident cancer cases were identified using population cancer registries in Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom. In France, Germany and Greece cancer cases were identified during follow-up by a combination of methods including: health insurance records, cancer and pathology registries, and by active follow-up directly through study participants or through next-of-kin. Controls were selected from the full cohort of individuals who were alive and free of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer) at the time of diagnoses of the cases, using incidence density sampling and matched by: age (±6 months at recruitment), sex, study center, follow-up time since blood collection, time of day at blood collection (±4 hours), fasting status, menopausal status, and phase of menstrual cycle at blood collection. The current study selected 2,400 incident colorectal cancer cases, and 2,400 matched controls.

HPFS, Health Professionals Follow-up Study: In 1993-1995, 18,825 men in the HPFS mailed blood samples by overnight courier, which were aliquoted into buffy coat and stored in liquid nitrogen. In 2001-2004, 13,956 men in the HPFS who had not provided a blood sample previously, mailed in a swish-and-spit sample of buccal cells. Incident cases were defined as those occurring after the subject provided a blood or buccal sample. Prevalent cases were defined as those occurring after enrollment in the study in 1986, but before the subject provided either a blood or buccal sample. After excluding participants with histories of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer), ulcerative colitis, or familial polyposis, 2 case-control sets were constructed from which DNA was isolated from either buffy coat or buccal cells for genotyping, as follows: (1) a case-control set with cases of colorectal cancer matched to randomly selected controls who provided a blood sample and were free of colorectal cancer at the same time the colorectal cancer was diagnosed in the cases; and (2) a case-control set with cases of colorectal cancer matched to randomly selected controls who provided a buccal sample and were free of colorectal cancer at the same time the colorectal cancer was diagnosed in the case. For both case-control sets, matching criteria included year of birth (within 1 year) and month/year of blood or buccal cell sampling (within 6 months). Cases were pair-matched 1:1, 1:2, or 1:3 with a control participant(s). For this study, colorectal cancer cases were ascertained through January 1, 2010 and excluded cases included in the previous discovery GWAS of colorectal cancer [PMID:23266556]. If no control could be matched for a case using the initial stringent criteria, age criteria were relaxed to <5 years to find an eligible control. A total of 237 CRC cases and 236 controls were selected for genotyping.

NHS, Nurses' Health Study:In 1989-1990, 32,826 women in NHS I mailed blood samples by overnight courier, which were aliquoted into buffy coat and stored in liquid nitrogen. In 2001-2004, 29,684 women in NHS I who did not previously provide a blood sample mailed a swish-and-spit sample of buccal cells. Incident cases were defined as those occurring after the subject provided a blood or buccal sample. Prevalent cases were defined as those occurring after enrollment in the study in 1976 but before the subject provided either a blood or buccal sample. After excluding participants with histories of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer), ulcerative colitis, or familial polyposis, 2 case-control sets were constructed from which DNA was isolated from either buffy coat or buccal cells for genotyping: (1) a case-control set with cases of colorectal cancer matched to randomly selected controls who provided a blood sample and were free of colorectal cancer at the same time the colorectal cancer was diagnosed in the case; and (2) a case-control set with cases of colorectal cancer matched to randomly selected controls who provided a buccal sample and were free of colorectal cancer at the same time the colorectal cancer was diagnosed in the cases. For this study, colorectal cancer cases were ascertained through June 1, 2012 and excluded cases included in the previous discovery GWAS of colorectal cancer [PMID:23266556]. For both case-control sets, matching criteria included year of birth (within 1 year) and month/year of blood or buccal cell sampling (within 1 year). If no control could be matched for a case using the initial stringent criteria, age criteria were relaxed to <5 years to find an eligible control. Cases were pair matched 1:1, 1:2, or 1:3 with a control participant(s). A total of 370 CRC cases and 370 controls were selected for genotyping.

NQplus, Nutrition Questionnaires plus: A total of 2,048 participants were recruited by inviting randomly selected inhabitants of the neighboring cities Wageningen, Ede, Renkum and Arnhem. In Veenendaal, another neighboring city, one individual of each household was invited to participate in the NQplus study. Baseline measurements consisted of a fasting venipuncture, dietary assessment, a physical examination, 24-h urine collection and general and lifestyle questionnaires. For this study, 179 persons without a blood sample, and those with a history of colorectal cancer, chronic inflammatory bowel disease or dementia were excluded. From the remaining 1,869 NQplus participants, controls were selected, whom were matched to the colorectal cancer cases of the COLON study by age and gender. A total of 737 control samples were selected for genotyping.

Molecular Data
TypeSourcePlatformNumber of Oligos/SNPsSNP Batch IdComment
Whole Genome Genotyping Illumina HumanOmniExpressExome 8v1-2_A N/A N/A
Selected publications
Diseases/Traits Related to Study (MESH terms)
Links to Related Resources
Authorized Data Access Requests
Study Attribution