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Study Description

The goal of this study was to identify SNPs associated with subjective, physiological, and behavioral responses to d-amphetamine. The study was double-blind and placebo-controlled. 381 healthy volunteers aged 18-35 years old received oral doses of d-amphetamine (10 and 20 mg) and placebo over the course of three different phenotyping sessions. A subset of subjects received a fourth dose of d-amphetamine (5 mg). Measures of subjective, cardiovascular and behavioral responses were obtained at regular intervals (pre-drug administration and 30, 60, 90, 150, and 180 minutes post-drug administration). The subjective measures included in the study were the Profile of Mood States (POMS), Drug Effects Questionnaire (DEQ) and Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI). Tasks included were the Digit Symbol Substitution (DSST) and Stop Task.

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Publicly Available Data (Public ftp)

Connect to the public download site. The site contains release notes and manifests. If available, the site also contains data dictionaries, variable summaries, documents, and truncated analyses.

Study Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria

Exclusion Criteria

Past year Axis I Disorder, history of mania or psychosis, less than a high-school level education, smoking more than ten cigarettes per week, drinking more than three cups of coffee per day, lack of English fluency, a body mass index out of the range of 19-26 kg/m2, any regular prescription medication except oral contraceptive or medical contraindication to amphetamine administration. Women not taking oral contraceptives were only tested in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle.

Molecular Data
TypeSourcePlatformNumber of Oligos/SNPsSNP Batch IdComment
Whole Genome Genotyping Affymetrix AFFY_6.0 934940 52074
Imputation 1000 Genomes Project 1000 Genomes N/A N/A
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Diseases/Traits Related to Study (MESH terms)
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