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Chronic venous leg ulcer treatment : future research needs : identification of future research needs from comparative effectiveness review no. 127

Author(s):
Lazarus, Gerald S, 1939-, author
Zenilman, Jonathan M. Chronic venous ulcers a comparative effectiveness review of treatment modalities
United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, sponsoring body
Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center, issuing body
Effective Health Care Program (US), issuing body
Title(s):
Chronic venous leg ulcer treatment : future research needs : identification of future research needs from comparative effectiveness review no. 127 / prepared for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ; prepared by Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center ; investigators, Gerald Lazarus, Fran Valle, Mahmoud Malas, Umair Qazi, Nisa Maruthur, Jonathan Zenilman, Chad Boult, David Doggett, Oluwakemi A. Fawole, Eric B. Bass.
Series:
Future research needs paper ; number 34
AHRQ publication ; no. 13(14)-EHC034-EF
Country of Publication:
United States
Publisher:
Rockville, MD : Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, November 2013.
Description:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (various pagings)) ; illustrations.
Language:
English
Electronic Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK184808/
Summary:
UNCERTAINTIES PROMPTING SYSTEMATIC REVIEW: Chronic venous leg ulcers affect between 500,000 and 2 million persons annually, and over 50 percent of leg ulcers in the United States are classified as venous ulcers. They are caused by elevated venous pressure, turbulent venous flow, and inadequate venous return that can be due to occlusion or reflux in the venous system. The Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center performed a systematic review to determine the effectiveness and safety of advanced wound dressings, systemic antibiotics, and surgical interventions relative to either compression systems or each other among patients with chronic venous leg ulcers. We defined chronic venous leg ulcers as active, noninfected ulcers present for 6 weeks or more with evidence of pre-existing venous disease. An analytic framework was used in the systematic review to describe research gaps. Standard therapy includes aggressive compression with debridement, which heals 50 to 60 percent of venous leg ulcers. Widely used add-on interventions include wound dressings with active components ("advanced wound dressings"), local or systemic antimicrobials, and venous surgery.The comparative effectiveness and safety of these advanced wound dressings, antimicrobials and surgical procedures is unclear. PURPOSE OF FUTURE RESEARCH NEEDS REPORT: We sought to identify the evidence gaps in the systematic review, to engage a representative group of stakeholders in prioritizing the gaps, and to develop future research needs questions regarding the high-priority gaps, with some discussion of appropriate study design taking into consideration the pertinent populations, interventions, comparisons, outcome measures, timing, and setting (PICOTS).
MeSH:
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Leg Ulcer/therapy*
United States
Varicose Ulcer/therapy*
Publication Type(s):
Review
Notes:
Title from PDF title page.
Addendum added January 2014.
Augmentation of: Chronic venous ulcers : a comparative effectiveness review of treatment modalities / Jonathan M. Zenilman. 2013.
Includes bibliographical references.
Issued also in print.
Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2007-10061-I. Prepared by: Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center, Baltimore, MD.
Description based on version viewed April 8, 2014.
Augmentation of (work): Zenilman, Jonathan M. Chronic venous ulcers : a comparative effectiveness review of treatment modalities.
NLM ID:
101628871 [Book]

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