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1.

Neurofibromatosis, type 1

Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is characterized by multiple café au lait spots, axillary and inguinal freckling, multiple cutaneous neurofibromas, iris Lisch nodules, and choroidal freckling. About half of people with NF1 have plexiform neurofibromas, but most are internal and not suspected clinically. Learning disabilities are present in at least 50% of individuals with NF1. Less common but potentially more serious manifestations include optic nerve and other central nervous system gliomas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, scoliosis, tibial dysplasia, and vasculopathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18013
Concept ID:
C0027831
Neoplastic Process
2.

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is an aggressive pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) characterized by malignant transformation in the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with proliferation of differentiated progeny (Loh et al., 2009). JMML constitutes approximately 30% of childhood cases of myelodysplastic syndrome and 2% of leukemia (Hasle et al., 1999). Although JMML is a progressive and often rapidly fatal disease without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), some patients have been shown to have a prolonged and stable clinical course without HSCT (Niemeyer et al., 1997). Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a similar disorder with later onset. Both JMML and CMML have a high frequency of mutations affecting the RAS signaling pathway and show hypersensitivity to stimulation with GM-CSF, which causes STAT5 (601511) hyperphosphorylation (Loh et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia In up to 60% of cases of JMML, the RAS/MAPK pathway is deregulated due to somatic mutations in the PTPN11 (176876), KRAS (190070), and NRAS (164790) genes. Additionally, both germline and somatic mutations in the CBL gene have been found in patients with JMML, indicating a frequency of 10 to 15% of JMML patients overall (Loh et al., 2009). Somatic disruptions of the GRAF gene (ARHGAP26; 605370) have also been found in patients with JMML. About 10 to 15% of JMML cases arise in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1; 162200) due to germline mutations in the NF1 gene (613113). In addition, patients with Noonan syndrome (NS1, 163950; NS3, 609942) or Noonan syndrome-like disorder (NSLL; 613563) due to germline mutations in the PTPN11, KRAS2, and CBL genes, respectively, also have an increased risk of developing JMML. Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Somatic mutations in the CBL, ASXL1 (612990), TET2 (612839), and SF3B1 (605590) genes have been found in patients with CMML. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
138109
Concept ID:
C0349639
Neoplastic Process
3.

Neurofibromatosis, familial spinal

Spinal neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a high load of spinal tumors. These tumors may be asymptomatic or result in neurologic symptoms, including back pain, difficulty walking, and paresthesias. Spinal NF is considered to be a subtype of neurofibromatosis type I (NF1; 162200), which is an allelic disorder. Patients with spinal NF may or may not have the classic cutaneous cafe-au-lait pigmentary macules or ocular Lisch nodules typically observed in patients with classic NF1. Patients with spinal NF should be followed closely for spinal sequelae (summary by Burkitt Wright et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320296
Concept ID:
C1834235
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome

A variant of neurofibromatosis type 1 characterised by the combination of features of neurofibromatosis type 1, such as café-au-lait spots, iris Lisch nodules, axillary and inguinal freckling, optic nerve glioma and multiple neurofibromas; and Noonan syndrome, with features such as short stature, typical facial features, congenital heart defects and unusual pectus deformity. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
419089
Concept ID:
C2931482
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Glioma susceptibility 1

Gliomas are central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells and comprise astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, and subependymomas. Glial cells can show various degrees of differentiation even within the same tumor (summary by Kyritsis et al., 2010). Ependymomas are rare glial tumors of the brain and spinal cord (Yokota et al., 2003). Subependymomas are unusual tumors believed to arise from the bipotential subependymal cell, which normally differentiates into either ependymal cells or astrocytes. They were characterized as a distinct entity by Scheinker (1945). They tend to be slow-growing, noninvasive, and located in the ventricular system, septum pellucidum, cerebral aqueduct, or proximal spinal cord (summary by Ryken et al., 1994). Gliomas are known to occur in association with several other well-defined hereditary tumor syndromes such as mismatch repair cancer syndrome (276300), melanoma-astrocytoma syndrome (155755), neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1; 162200) and NF2 (101000), and tuberous sclerosis (TSC1; 191100). Familial clustering of gliomas may occur in the absence of these tumor syndromes, however. Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Glioma Other glioma susceptibilities include GLM2 (613028), caused by variation in the PTEN gene (601728) on chromosome 10q23; GLM3 (613029), caused by variation in the BRCA2 gene (600185) on chromosome 13q12; GLM4 (607248), mapped to chromosome 15q23-q26.3; GLM5 (613030), mapped to chromosome 9p21; GLM6 (613031), mapped to chromosome 20q13; GLM7 (613032), mapped to chromosome 8q24; GLM8 (613033), mapped to chromosome 5p15; and GLM9, caused by variation in the POT1 gene (606478) on chromosome 7q31. Somatic mutation, disruption, or copy number variation of the following genes or loci may also contribute to the formation of glioma: ERBB (EGFR; 131550), ERBB2 (164870), LGI1 (604619), GAS41 (602116), GLI (165220), DMBT1 (601969), IDH1 (147700), IDH2 (147650), BRAF (164757), PARK2 (602544), TP53 (191170), RB1 (614041), PIK3CA (171834), 10p15, 19q, and 17p13.3. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
413414
Concept ID:
C2750850
Finding
6.

Chromosome 17q11.2 deletion syndrome, 1.4 MB

Approximately 5 to 20% of all patients with neurofibromatosis type I (162200) carry a heterozygous deletion of approximately 1.4 Mb involving the NF1 gene and contiguous genes lying in its flanking regions (Riva et al., 2000; Jenne et al., 2001), which is caused by nonallelic homologous recombination of NF1 repeats A and C (Dorschner et al., 2000). The 'NF1 microdeletion syndrome' is often characterized by a more severe phenotype than that observed in the majority of NF1 patients. In particular, patients with NF1 microdeletion often show variable facial dysmorphism, mental retardation, developmental delay, an excessive number of early-onset neurofibromas (Venturin et al., 2004), and an increased risk for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (De Raedt et al., 2003). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462278
Concept ID:
C3150928
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Gastrointestinal stroma tumor

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are mesenchymal tumors found in the gastrointestinal tract that originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal, the pacemaker cells that regulate peristalsis in the digestive tract. Approximately 70% of GISTs develop in the stomach, 20% in the small intestine, and less than 10% in the esophagus, colon, and rectum. GISTs are typically more cellular than other gastrointestinal sarcomas. They occur predominantly in patients who are 40 to 70 years old but in rare cases may occur in younger persons (Miettinen et al., 1999, 1999). GISTs can also be seen in neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1; 162200) due to mutations in the NF1 gene, and are thus distinct from the GISTs described here. Sandberg and Bridge (2002) reviewed the cytogenetics and molecular genetics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Coffey et al. (2007) reviewed the clinical features, pathogenesis, and molecular treatments of Menetrier disease (137280) and GIST, both of which are hyperproliferative disorders of the stomach caused by dysregulated receptor tyrosine kinases. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
116049
Concept ID:
C0238198
Neoplastic Process
8.

Legius syndrome

Legius syndrome is characterized by multiple café au lait macules without neurofibromas or other tumor manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Additional clinical manifestations reported commonly include intertriginous freckling, lipomas, macrocephaly, and learning disabilities / ADHD / developmental delays. Current knowledge of the natural history of Legius syndrome is based on the clinical manifestations of fewer than 200 individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis; better delineation of the clinical manifestations and natural history of Legius syndrome will likely occur as more affected individuals are identified. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
370709
Concept ID:
C1969623
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Café-au-lait macules with pulmonary stenosis

Watson syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by pulmonic stenosis, cafe-au-lait spots, decreased intellectual ability (Watson, 1967), and short stature (Partington et al., 1985). Most affected individuals have relative macrocephaly and Lisch nodules and about one-third of those affected have neurofibroma (Allanson et al., 1991). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
107817
Concept ID:
C0553586
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Isolated hemihyperplasia

Isolated hemihyperplasia is an abnormality of cell proliferation leading to asymmetric overgrowth of one or more regions of the body. The term 'hemihyperplasia' has replaced the term 'hemihypertrophy' to describe accurately the increase in cell number found in these patients. The incidence of isolated hemihyperplasia is estimated to be 1 in 86,000. Idiopathic hemihypertrophy is associated with increased risk of embryonal cancers in childhood, particularly Wilms tumor (194070) (Shuman et al., 2006). Hoyme et al. (1998) provided an anatomic classification of hemihyperplasia: complex hemihyperplasia is involvement of half of the body, including at least 1 arm and 1 leg; affected parts may be contralateral or ipsilateral. Simple hemihyperplasia is involvement of a single limb. See also facial hemihyperplasia (133900). Although isolated hemihyperplasia is a distinct clinical entity, it can also occur as a feature of overgrowth syndromes, including Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS; 130650), neurofibromatosis (NF1; 162200), Proteus syndrome (176920), and Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (149000) (Shuman et al., 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
383853
Concept ID:
C1856184
Disease or Syndrome
11.

NF1 microduplication syndrome

MedGen UID:
501218
Concept ID:
C3495679
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Neurofibromatosis type 1 due to NF1 mutation or intragenic deletion

MedGen UID:
799129
Concept ID:
CN204726
Disease or Syndrome
13.

17q11 microdeletion syndrome

17q11 microdeletion syndrome is a rare severe form of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; see this term) characterized by mild facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, intellectual disability, increased risk of malignancies, and a large number of neurofibromas. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
831100
Concept ID:
CN206928
Disease or Syndrome
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