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  • Wrong UID 428104
1.

Carnitine acylcarnitine translocase deficiency

Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Metabolic consequences include hypoketotic hypoglycemia under fasting conditions, hyperammonemia, elevated creatine kinase and transaminases, dicarboxylic aciduria, very low free carnitine and abnormal acylcarnitine profile with marked elevation of the long-chain acylcarnitines. Clinical features include neurologic abnormalities, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias, skeletal muscle damage, and liver dysfunction. Most patients become symptomatic in the neonatal period with a rapidly progressive deterioration and a high mortality rate. However, presentations at a later age with a milder phenotype have been reported (summary by Rubio-Gozalbo et al., 2004). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
91000
Concept ID:
C0342791
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, type 10

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
347543
Concept ID:
C1857777
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, type 5

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
346805
Concept ID:
C1858379
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, type 8

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
336069
Concept ID:
C1843896
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 10

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is typically defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Such LVH occurs in a non-dilated ventricle in the absence of other cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the observed magnitude of increased LV wall thickness, such as pressure overload (e.g., long-standing hypertension, aortic stenosis) or storage/infiltrative disorders (e.g., Fabry disease, amyloidosis). The clinical manifestations of HCM range from asymptomatic LVH to progressive heart failure to sudden cardiac death (SCD), and vary from individual to individual even within the same family. Common symptoms include shortness of breath (particularly with exertion), chest pain, palpitations, orthostasis, presyncope, and syncope. Most often the LVH of HCM becomes apparent during adolescence or young adulthood, although it may also develop late in life, in infancy, or in childhood. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
331754
Concept ID:
C1834460
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, type 12

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
409749
Concept ID:
C1969081
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1Y

Nonsyndromic isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction, a reduction in the myocardial force of contraction. DCM usually presents with any one of the following: Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion). Arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease. Thromboembolic disease (from left ventricular mural thrombus) including stroke. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
437215
Concept ID:
C2678476
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Ventricular tachycardia, catecholaminergic polymorphic, 2

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean age of onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and twelve years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
393837
Concept ID:
C2677794
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Brugada syndrome 8

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST-segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on ECG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood although age at diagnosis may range from infancy to late adulthood. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and the sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
413928
Concept ID:
C2751083
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean age of onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and twelve years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
351513
Concept ID:
C1631597
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1O

Nonsyndromic isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction, a reduction in the myocardial force of contraction. DCM usually presents with any one of the following: Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion). Arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease. Thromboembolic disease (from left ventricular mural thrombus) including stroke. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
325268
Concept ID:
C1837839
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Cardiomyopathy dilated with woolly hair and keratoderma

This syndrome has characteristics of woolly hair, palmoplantar keratoderma and dilated cardiomyopathy principally affecting the left ventricle. Only a few cases have been reported, all involving patients from Ecuador, India or Turkey. The woolly hair is present at birth and the palmoplantar keratoderma appears during the first year of life. The cardiac anomaly presents during childhood and is marked by dilation of the left ventricle accompanied by alterations in muscle contractility. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait and is caused by mutations in the DSP gene (6p24) encoding desmoplakin, a protein involved in cell adhesion. The syndrome is similar to Naxos disease. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
340124
Concept ID:
C1854063
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 16

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is typically defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Such LVH occurs in a non-dilated ventricle in the absence of other cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the observed magnitude of increased LV wall thickness, such as pressure overload (e.g., long-standing hypertension, aortic stenosis) or storage/infiltrative disorders (e.g., Fabry disease, amyloidosis). The clinical manifestations of HCM range from asymptomatic LVH to progressive heart failure to sudden cardiac death (SCD), and vary from individual to individual even within the same family. Common symptoms include shortness of breath (particularly with exertion), chest pain, palpitations, orthostasis, presyncope, and syncope. Most often the LVH of HCM becomes apparent during adolescence or young adulthood, although it may also develop late in life, in infancy, or in childhood. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
462554
Concept ID:
C3151204
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 12

MedGen UID:
393755
Concept ID:
C2677491
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Ventricular tachycardia, catecholaminergic polymorphic, 5, with or without muscle weakness

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean age of onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and twelve years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
815866
Concept ID:
C3809536
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Ventricular tachycardia, catecholaminergic polymorphic, 4

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean age of onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and twelve years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
766961
Concept ID:
C3554047
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 17

MedGen UID:
462614
Concept ID:
C3151264
Disease or Syndrome
18.

N-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency

Ogden syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by postnatal growth failure, severely delayed psychomotor development, variable dysmorphic features, and hypotonia. Most patients also have cardiac malformations or arrhythmias (summary by Popp et al., 2015). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
477078
Concept ID:
C3275447
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Ventricular tachycardia, catecholaminergic polymorphic, 3

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by episodic syncope occurring during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. The underlying cause of these episodes is the onset of fast ventricular tachycardia (bidirectional or polymorphic). Spontaneous recovery may occur when these arrhythmias self-terminate. In other instances, ventricular tachycardia may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and cause sudden death if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not readily available. The mean age of onset of symptoms (usually a syncopal episode) is between age seven and twelve years; onset as late as the fourth decade of life has been reported. If untreated, CPVT is highly lethal, as approximately 30% of affected individuals experience at least one cardiac arrest and up to 80% one or more syncopal spells. Sudden death may be the first manifestation of the disease. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
462813
Concept ID:
C3151463
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 13

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia is characterized by progressive fibrofatty myocardial replacement, primarily of the right ventricle. The main clinical features are structural and functional abnormalities of the ventricles, electrocardiographic depolarization/repolarization changes, reentrant arrhythmias, and sudden death (summary by van Hengel et al., 2013). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
816468
Concept ID:
C3810138
Disease or Syndrome
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