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  • Wrong UID 504393
1.

Acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
78652
Concept ID:
C0268250
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita distal type 1

In general, the distal arthrogryposes are a group of disorders characterized by contractures mainly involving the distal parts of the limbs. The hands have a characteristic position with medially overlapping fingers, clenched fists, ulnar deviation of fingers, and camptodactyly, and the feet have deformities. Contractures at other joints are variable; there are no associated visceral anomalies, and intelligence is normal. Classically, DA was defined as being without overt neurologic or muscle disease (Lin et al., 1977 and Hall et al., 1982), although more recent evidence suggests that DA1A due to TPM2 mutations results from muscle dysfunction (Robinson et al., 2007; Mokbel et al., 2013; Davidson et al., 2013). The prototypic distal arthrogryposis is type 1 (DA1), which is characterized largely by camptodactyly and clubfoot. Hypoplasia and/or absence of some interphalangeal creases is common. The shoulders and hips are less frequently affected. While the pattern of affected joints is consistent, the degree to which the joints are affected is highly variable, with equinovarus deformities ranging from mild to severe and hand involvement ranging from isolated hypoplasia of the distal interphalangeal crease of the fifth digit to severely clenched fists and ulnar deviation of the wrist. The various phenotypic forms of distal arthrogryposis are classified hierarchically according to the proportion of features they share with one another and are designated DA1 through DA10 (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). Bamshad et al. (1996) revised the classification by Hall et al. (1982) of the common mendelian arthrogryposis syndromes. Krakowiak et al. (1997) provided a useful classification of the distal arthrogryposes. Genetic Heterogeneity of Distal Arthrogryposes Distal arthrogryposis type 1 includes DA1A, caused by mutation in the TPM2 gene, and DA1B (614335), caused by mutation in the MYBPC1 gene (160794) on chromosome 12q23.2. Other forms include DA2A (Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, 193700), caused by mutation in the MYH3 gene (160720) on chromosome 17p13.1; DA2B (Sheldon-Hall syndrome, 601680), caused by mutation in MYH3, the TNNT3 gene (600692) on chromosome 11p15.5, the TNNI2 gene (191043), also on 11p15.5, or TPM2 (190990) on chromosome 9p13; DA3 (Gordon syndrome, 114300) and DA5 (108145), caused by mutation in the PIEZO2 gene (613629) on chromosome 18p11; DA4 (609128); DA5D (615065), caused by mutation in the ECEL1 gene (605896) on chromosome 2q36; DA6 (108200); DA7 (158300), caused by mutation in the MYH8 gene (160741) on chromosome 17p13.1; DA8 (178110), caused by mutation in the MYH3 gene (160720) on chromosome 17p13; DA9 (121050), caused by mutation in the FBN2 gene (612570) on chromosome 5q23-q31; and DA10 (187370), which maps to chromosome 2q. See 277720 for discussion of a possible autosomal recessive form of DA2A. See 208155 for a description of Illum syndrome, which includes 'whistling face,' central nervous system dysfunction, and calcium deposition in central nervous system and muscle. There are other forms of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), including a lethal congenital form (see LCCS1, 253310). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
113099
Concept ID:
C0220662
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Nager syndrome

Nager syndrome is the prototype for a group of disorders collectively referred to as the acrofacial dysostoses (AFDs), which are characterized by malformation of the craniofacial skeleton and the limbs. The major facial features of Nager syndrome include downslanted palpebral fissures, midface retrusion, and micrognathia, the latter of which often requires the placement of a tracheostomy in early childhood. Limb defects typically involve the anterior (radial) elements of the upper limbs and manifest as small or absent thumbs, triphalangeal thumbs, radial hypoplasia or aplasia, and radioulnar synostosis. Phocomelia of the upper limbs and, occasionally, lower-limb defects have also been reported. The presence of anterior upper-limb defects and the typical lack of lower-limb involvement distinguishes Nager syndrome from Miller syndrome (263750), another rare AFD; however, distinguishing Nager syndrome from other AFDs, including Miller syndrome, can be challenging (summary by Bernier et al., 2012). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
120519
Concept ID:
C0265245
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hecht syndrome

MedGen UID:
78540
Concept ID:
C0265226
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Carney complex variant

MedGen UID:
332400
Concept ID:
C1837245
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Faciodigitogenital syndrome, autosomal recessive

A very rare syndrome including short stature, facial dysmorphism, hand abnormalities and shawl scrotum. It has been observed in 16 subjects from five distantly related sibships of a large Kuwaiti Bedouin tribe. The affected patients had no intellectual deficit. Transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
341637
Concept ID:
C1856871
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Branchiogenic-deafness syndrome

A multiple congenital anomalies syndrome, described in one family to date, with characteristics of branchial cysts or fistula, ear malformations, congenital hearing loss (conductive, sensorineural, and mixed), internal auditory canal hypoplasia, strabismus, trismus, abnormal fifth fingers, vitiliginous lesions, short stature and mild learning disability. Renal and urethral abnormalities are absent. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
322970
Concept ID:
C1836673
Disease or Syndrome
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