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1.

Carney complex, type 1

Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by skin pigmentary abnormalities, myxomas, endocrine tumors or overactivity, and schwannomas. Pale brown to black lentigines are the most common presenting feature of CNC and typically increase in number at puberty. Cardiac myxomas occur at a young age, may occur in any or all cardiac chambers, and manifest as intracardiac obstruction of blood flow, embolic phenomena, and/or heart failure. Other sites for myxomas include the skin, breast, oropharynx, and female genital tract. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which causes Cushing syndrome, is the most frequently observed endocrine tumor in CNC, occurring in approximately 25% of affected individuals. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCTs) are observed in one third of affected males within the first decade and in almost all adult males. Up to 75% of individuals with CNC have multiple thyroid nodules, most of which are thyroid follicular adenomas. Clinically evident acromegaly from a growth hormone (GH)-producing adenoma is evident in approximately 10% of adults. Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS), a rare tumor of the nerve sheath, occurs in an estimated 10% of affected individuals. The median age of diagnosis is 20 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
388559
Concept ID:
C2607929
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Schwannomatosis 2

Schwannomatosis is an adult-onset tumor predisposition syndrome characterized by the development of multiple schwannomas in various areas of the body (summary by Piotrowski et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of schwannomatosis, see SWNTS1 (162091). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
816613
Concept ID:
C3810283
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Schwannomatosis

Schwannomatosis is a disorder characterized by multiple noncancerous (benign) tumors called schwannomas, which are a type of tumor that grows on nerves. Schwannomas develop when Schwann cells, which are specialized cells that normally form an insulating layer around the nerve, grow uncontrollably to form a tumor.The signs and symptoms of schwannomatosis usually appear in early adulthood. The most common symptom is long-lasting (chronic) pain, which can affect any part of the body. In some cases, the pain is felt in areas where there are no known tumors. The pain associated with this condition ranges from mild to severe and can be difficult to manage. Other signs and symptoms that can occur with schwannomatosis depend on the location of the tumors and which nerves are affected. These problems include numbness, weakness, tingling, and headaches. The life expectancy of people with schwannomatosis is normal.Schwannomatosis is usually considered to be a form of neurofibromatosis, which is a group of disorders characterized by the growth of tumors in the nervous system. The other two recognized forms of neurofibromatosis are neurofibromatosis type 1 and neurofibromatosis type 2. The features of schwannomatosis can be very similar to those of neurofibromatosis type 2. However, schwannomatosis almost never includes inner ear tumors called vestibular schwannomas, which are a hallmark of neurofibromatosis type 2. Additional features of the other forms of neurofibromatosis, including the development of other types of tumors, are much less common in schwannomatosis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
234775
Concept ID:
C1335929
Neoplastic Process
4.

SCHWANNOMATOSIS 1

MedGen UID:
887689
Concept ID:
C4048809
Neoplastic Process
5.

Schwannoma

A benign nerve sheath tumor composed of Schwann cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
451406
Concept ID:
CN116907
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