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  • Wrong UID 505385
1.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy

The dystrophinopathies include a spectrum of muscle disease caused by pathogenic variants in DMD, which encodes the protein dystrophin. The mild end of the spectrum includes the phenotypes of asymptomatic increase in serum concentration of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and muscle cramps with myoglobinuria. The severe end of the spectrum includes progressive muscle diseases that are classified as Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy when skeletal muscle is primarily affected and as DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) when the heart is primarily affected. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) usually presents in early childhood with delayed milestones, including delays in sitting and standing independently. Proximal weakness causes a waddling gait and difficulty climbing. DMD is rapidly progressive, with affected children being wheelchair dependent by age 13 years. Cardiomyopathy occurs in individuals with DMD after age 18 years. Few survive beyond the third decade, with respiratory complications and cardiomyopathy being common causes of death. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by later-onset skeletal muscle weakness; some individuals remain ambulatory into their 20s. Despite the milder skeletal muscle involvement, heart failure from DCM is a common cause of morbidity and the most common cause of death in BMD. Mean age of death is in the mid-40s. DMD-associated DCM is characterized by left ventricular dilation and congestive heart failure. Females heterozygous for a DMD pathogenic variant are at increased risk for DCM. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3925
Concept ID:
C0013264
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Leigh syndrome

Leigh syndrome is an early-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a characteristic neuropathology consisting of focal, bilateral lesions in one or more areas of the central nervous system, including the brainstem, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions are areas of demyelination, gliosis, necrosis, spongiosis, or capillary proliferation. Clinical symptoms depend on which areas of the central nervous system are involved. The most common underlying cause is a defect in oxidative phosphorylation (Dahl, 1998). Leigh syndrome may be a feature of a deficiency of any of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes: complex I deficiency (252010), complex II deficiency (252011), complex III deficiency (124000), complex IV deficiency (cytochrome c oxidase; 220110), or complex V deficiency (604273). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
44095
Concept ID:
C0023264
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Costello syndrome

Costello syndrome is characterized by failure to thrive in infancy as a result of severe postnatal feeding difficulties; short stature; developmental delay or intellectual disability; coarse facial features (full lips, large mouth, full nasal tip); curly or sparse, fine hair; loose, soft skin with deep palmar and plantar creases; papillomata of the face and perianal region; diffuse hypotonia and joint laxity with ulnar deviation of the wrists and fingers; tight Achilles tendons; and cardiac involvement including: cardiac hypertrophy (usually typical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [HCM]), congenital heart defect (usually valvar pulmonic stenosis), and arrhythmia (usually supraventricular tachycardia, especially chaotic atrial rhythm/multifocal atrial tachycardia or ectopic atrial tachycardia). Relative or absolute macrocephaly is typical, and postnatal cerebellar overgrowth can result in the development of a Chiari I malformation with associated anomalies including hydrocephalus or syringomyelia. Individuals with Costello syndrome have an approximately 15% lifetime risk for malignant tumors including rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma in young children and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in adolescents and young adults. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
108454
Concept ID:
C0587248
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Werdnig-Hoffmann disease

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy resulting from progressive degeneration and loss of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord (i.e., lower motor neurons) and the brain stem nuclei. The onset of weakness ranges from before birth to adolescence or young adulthood. The weakness is symmetric, proximal > distal, and progressive. Before the genetic basis of SMA was understood, it was classified into clinical subtypes; however, it is now apparent that the phenotype of SMN1-associated SMA spans a continuum without clear delineation of subtypes. Poor weight gain with growth failure, restrictive lung disease, scoliosis, joint contractures, and sleep difficulties are common complications. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21913
Concept ID:
C0043116
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Mitochondrial complex I deficiency

Isolated complex I deficiency is the most common enzymatic defect of the oxidative phosphorylation disorders (McFarland et al., 2004; Kirby et al., 2004). It causes a wide range of clinical disorders, ranging from lethal neonatal disease to adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. Phenotypes include macrocephaly with progressive leukodystrophy, nonspecific encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, liver disease, Leigh syndrome (256000), Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (535000), and some forms of Parkinson disease (see 556500) (Loeffen et al., 2000; Pitkanen et al., 1996; Robinson, 1998). Genetic Heterogeneity of Complex I Deficiency Mitochondrial complex I deficiency shows extreme genetic heterogeneity and can be caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes or in mitochondrial-encoded genes. There are no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations, and inference of the underlying basis from the clinical or biochemical presentation is difficult, if not impossible (summary by Haack et al., 2012). However, the majority of cases are caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes (Loeffen et al., 2000; Triepels et al., 2001). Complex I deficiency with autosomal recessive inheritance results from mutation in nuclear-encoded subunit genes, including NDUFV1 (161015), NDUFV2 (600532), NDUFS1 (157655), NDUFS2 (602985), NDUFS3 (603846), NDUFS4 (602694), NDUFS6 (603848), NDUFS7 (601825), NDUFS8 (602141), NDUFA2 (602137), NDUFA11 (612638), NDUFAF3 (612911), NDUFA10 (603835), NDUFB3 (603839), NDUFB9 (601445), and the complex I assembly genes B17.2L (609653), HRPAP20 (611776), C20ORF7 (612360), NUBPL (613621), NDUFAF1 (606934), and TMEM126B (615533). The disorder can also be caused by mutation in other nuclear-encoded genes, including FOXRED1 (613622), ACAD9 (611103; see 611126), and MTFMT (611766; see 256000). X-linked inheritance is observed with mutations in the NDUFA1 (300078) and NDUFB11 (300403) genes. Complex I deficiency with mitochondrial inheritance has been associated with mutation in 6 mitochondrial-encoded components of complex I: MTND1 (516000), MTND2 (516001), MTND3 (516002), MTND4 (516003), MTND5 (516005), MTND6 (516006). Most of these patients have a phenotype of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON; 535000) or Leigh syndrome (256000). Features of complex I deficiency may also be caused by mutation in other mitochondrial genes, including MTTS2 (590085). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal 10

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual loss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by pathogenic variants in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
350481
Concept ID:
C1864669
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type II

The otopalatodigital (OPD) spectrum disorders, characterized primarily by skeletal dysplasia, include the following: Otopalatodigital syndrome type I (OPD1). Otopalatodigital syndrome type II (OPD2). Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD). Melnick-Needles syndrome (MNS). Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary skin defects (TODPD). In OPD1, most manifestations are present at birth; females can present with severity similar to affected males, although some have only mild manifestations. In OPD2, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Most males with OPD2 die during the first year of life, usually from thoracic hypoplasia resulting in pulmonary insufficiency. Males who live beyond the first year of life are usually developmentally delayed and require respiratory support and assistance with feeding. In FMD, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Males do not experience progression of skeletal dysplasia but may have joint contractures and hand and foot malformations. Progressive scoliosis is observed in both affected males and females. In MNS, wide phenotypic variability is observed; some individuals are diagnosed in adulthood, while others require respiratory support and have reduced longevity. Prenatal lethality is most common in males with MNS. TODPD is a female limited condition, characterized by terminal skeletal dysplasia, pigmentary defects of the skin, and recurrent digital fibromata. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
337064
Concept ID:
C1844696
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
8.

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C

Charcot-Marie-Tooth hereditary neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal (non-demyelinating) peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy, mild sensory loss, and normal or near-normal nerve conduction velocities. CMT2 is clinically similar to CMT1, although typically less severe. Peripheral nerves are not enlarged or hypertrophic. The subtypes of CMT2 are similar clinically and distinguished only by molecular genetic findings. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
389170
Concept ID:
C2079540
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency

The mitochondrial trifunctional protein, composed of 4 alpha and 4 beta subunits, catalyzes 3 steps in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids: long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, and long-chain thiolase activities. Trifunctional protein deficiency is characterized by decreased activity of all 3 enzymes. Clinically, classic trifunctional protein deficiency can be classified into 3 main clinical phenotypes: neonatal onset of a severe, lethal condition resulting in sudden unexplained infant death (SIDS; 272120), infantile onset of a hepatic Reye-like syndrome, and late-adolescent onset of primarily a skeletal myopathy (Spiekerkoetter et al., 2003). Some patients with MTP deficiency show a protracted progressive course associated with myopathy, recurrent rhabdomyolysis, and sensorimotor axonal neuropathy. These patients tend to survive into adolescence and adulthood (den Boer et al., 2003). See also isolated LCHAD deficiency (609016), which is caused by mutation in the HADHA gene. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
87460
Concept ID:
C0342786
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Niemann-Pick disease type C2

Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a lipid storage disease that can present in infants, children, or adults. Neonates can present with ascites and severe liver disease from infiltration of the liver and/or respiratory failure from infiltration of the lungs. Other infants, without liver or pulmonary disease, have hypotonia and developmental delay. The classic presentation occurs in mid-to-late childhood with the insidious onset of ataxia, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP), and dementia. Dystonia and seizures are common. Dysarthria and dysphagia eventually become disabling, making oral feeding impossible; death usually occurs in the late second or third decade from aspiration pneumonia. Adults are more likely to present with dementia or psychiatric symptoms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
335942
Concept ID:
C1843366
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Alpha-B crystallinopathy

Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by slowly progressive weakness that can involve both proximal and distal muscles. Distal muscle weakness is present in about 80% of individuals and is more pronounced than proximal weakness in about 25%. A minority of individuals experience sensory symptoms, muscle stiffness, aching, or cramps. Peripheral neuropathy is present in about 20% of affected individuals. Overt cardiomyopathy is present in 15%-30%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
324735
Concept ID:
C1837317
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Progressive myositis ossificans

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is a rare autosomal dominant disease with complete penetrance involving progressive ossification of skeletal muscle, fascia, tendons, and ligaments. FOP has a prevalence of approximately 1 in 2 million worldwide, and shows no geographic, ethnic, racial, or gender preference. Individuals with FOP appear normal at birth except for great toe abnormalities: the great toes are short, deviated, and monophalangic. Ossification occurs progressively over the course of a lifetime in an inevitable and unpredictable episodic manner, with most patients being confined to a wheelchair by the third decade of life and requiring lifelong care (summary by Petrie et al., 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
4698
Concept ID:
C0016037
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Surfactant metabolism dysfunction, pulmonary, 1

Inborn errors of pulmonary surfactant metabolism are genetically heterogeneous disorders resulting in severe respiratory insufficiency or failure in full-term neonates or infants. These disorders are associated with various pathologic entities, including pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), desquamative interstitial pneumonitis (DIP), or cellular nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP) (Clark and Clark, 2005). A clinically similar disorder characterized by respiratory distress (267450) can affect preterm infants, who show developmental deficiency of surfactant. Acquired PAP (610910) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the presence of autoantobodies to CSF2 (138960). Genetic Heterogeneity of Pulmonary Surfactant Metabolism Dysfunction See also SMDP2 (610913), caused by mutation in the SPTPC gene (178620) on 8p21; SMDP3 (610921), caused by mutation in the ABCA3 gene (601615) on 16p13; SMDP4 (300770), caused by mutation in the CSF2RA gene (306250) on Xp; and SMDP5 (614370), caused by mutation in the CSF2RB gene (138981) on 22q12. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
368844
Concept ID:
C1968602
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency, lethal neonatal

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
318896
Concept ID:
C1833518
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Infantile nephronophthisis

Nephronophthisis is a disorder that affects the kidneys. It is characterized by inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) that impairs kidney function. These abnormalities lead to increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). In addition, affected individuals develop fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys, usually in an area known as the corticomedullary region. Another feature of nephronophthisis is a shortage of red blood cells, a condition known as anemia.Nephronophthisis eventually leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively. Nephronophthisis can be classified by the approximate age at which ESRD begins: around age 1 (infantile), around age 13 (juvenile), and around age 19 (adolescent).About 85 percent of all cases of nephronophthisis are isolated, which means they occur without other signs and symptoms. Some people with nephronophthisis have additional features, which can include liver fibrosis, heart abnormalities, or mirror image reversal of the position of one or more organs inside the body (situs inversus).Nephronophthisis can occur as part of separate syndromes that affect other areas of the body; these are often referred to as nephronophthisis-associated ciliopathies. For example, Senior-Løken syndrome is characterized by the combination of nephronophthisis and a breakdown of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retinal degeneration); Joubert syndrome affects many parts of the body, causing neurological problems and other features, which can include nephronophthisis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
355574
Concept ID:
C1865872
Disease or Syndrome
16.

VACTERL association with hydrocephalus

VACTERL describes a constellation of congenital anomalies, including vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, congenital cardiac disease, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal anomalies, radial dysplasia, and other limb defects; see 192350. Cases of familial VACTERL with hydrocephalus (H) have been reported with suggestion of autosomal recessive or X-linked inheritance (see 314390). Other patients thought to have VACTERL-H, including 2 unrelated infants reported by Porteous et al. (1992), had been found to have Fanconi anemia (see 227650). Porteous et al. (1992) suggested that chromosomal breakage studies should be performed in all cases of VACTERL/VACTERL-H to rule out Fanconi anemia. Alter et al. (2007) noted that a VATER phenotype had been reported in Fanconi anemia of complementation groups A (227650), C (227645), D1 (605724), E (600901), F (603467), and G (614082). X-linked VACTERL-H is also associated with mutations in the FANCB gene (300515). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
376400
Concept ID:
C1848599
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 9 (encephalomyopathic with methylmalonic aciduria)

Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-9 is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by infantile onset of hypotonia, lactic acidosis, severe psychomotor retardation, progressive neurologic deterioration, and excretion of methylmalonic acid. Some patients die in early infancy (summary by Rouzier et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462826
Concept ID:
C3151476
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Spinal muscular atrophy, distal, autosomal recessive, 1

Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an inherited condition that causes muscle weakness and respiratory failure typically beginning in infancy. Early features of this condition are difficult and noisy breathing, especially when inhaling; a weak cry; problems feeding; and recurrent episodes of pneumonia. Typically between the ages of 6 weeks and 6 months, infants with this condition will experience a sudden inability to breathe due to paralysis of the muscle that separates the abdomen from the chest cavity (the diaphragm). Normally, the diaphragm contracts and moves downward during inhalation to allow the lungs to expand. With diaphragm paralysis, affected individuals require life-long support with a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation). Rarely, children with SMARD1 develop signs or symptoms of the disorder later in childhood.Soon after respiratory failure occurs, individuals with SMARD1 develop muscle weakness in their distal muscles. These are the muscles farther from the center of the body, such as muscles in the hands and feet. The weakness soon spreads to all muscles; however, within 2 years, the muscle weakness typically stops getting worse. Some individuals may retain a low level of muscle function, while others lose all ability to move their muscles. Muscle weakness severely impairs motor development, such as sitting, standing, and walking. Some affected children develop an abnormal side-to-side and back-to-front curvature of the spine (scoliosis and kyphosis, often called kyphoscoliosis when they occur together). After approximately the first year of life, individuals with SMARD1 may lose their deep tendon reflexes, such as the reflex being tested when a doctor taps the knee with a hammer.Other features of SMARD1 can include reduced pain sensitivity, excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis), loss of bladder and bowel control, and an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia).
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
388083
Concept ID:
C1858517
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Surfactant metabolism dysfunction, pulmonary, 3

For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of pulmonary surfactant metabolism dysfunction, see SMDP1 (265120). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
410074
Concept ID:
C1970456
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Myhre syndrome

Myhre syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, including microcephaly, midface hypoplasia, prognathism, and blepharophimosis, as well as typical skeletal anomalies, including short stature, square body shape, broad ribs, iliac hypoplasia, brachydactyly, flattened vertebrae, and thickened calvaria. Other features, such as congenital heart disease, may also occur. All reported cases have been sporadic (summary by Bachmann-Gagescu et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
167103
Concept ID:
C0796081
Disease or Syndrome
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