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  • Wrong UID 446854
1.

Zellweger syndrome

Peroxisome biogenesis disorders, Zellweger syndrome spectrum (PBD, ZSS) is a continuum comprising three phenotypes — Zellweger syndrome (ZS), the most severe; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD); and infantile Refsum disease (IRD), the least severe — that were originally described before the biochemical and molecular bases of these disorders had been fully determined. Individuals with PBD, ZSS usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. In the newborn period, affected children are hypotonic, feed poorly, and have distinctive facies, seizures, and liver cysts with hepatic dysfunction. Bony stippling (chondrodysplasia punctata) of the patella(e) and other long bones may occur. Infants with ZS are significantly impaired and typically die during the first year of life, usually having made no developmental progress. Older children have retinal dystrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, developmental delay with hypotonia, and liver dysfunction. The clinical courses of NALD and IRD are variable and may include developmental delays, hearing loss, vision impairment, liver dysfunction, episodes of hemorrhage, and intracranial bleeding. While some children can be very hypotonic, others learn to walk and talk. The condition is often slowly progressive. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21958
Concept ID:
C0043459
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
2.

Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-A

The phenotypic spectrum of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is a continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressive early-onset form to a slowly progressive later-onset form. Children with MPS IVA have no distinctive clinical findings at birth. The severe form is usually apparent between ages one and three years, often first manifesting as kyphoscoliosis, knock-knee (genu valgum), and pectus carinatum; the slowly progressive form may not become evident until late childhood or adolescence often first manifesting as hip problems (pain, stiffness, and Legg Perthes disease). Progressive bone and joint involvement leads to short stature, and eventually to disabling pain and arthritis. Involvement of other organ systems can lead to significant morbidity, including respiratory compromise, obstructive sleep apnea, valvular heart disease, hearing impairment, visual impairment from corneal clouding, dental abnormalities, and hepatomegaly. Compression of the spinal cord is a common complication that results in neurologic impairment. Children with MPS IVA have normal intellectual abilities at the outset of the disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
43375
Concept ID:
C0086651
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Aniridia 1

Aniridia is characterized by complete or partial iris hypoplasia usually (but not always) with associated foveal hypoplasia resulting in reduced visual acuity and nystagmus presenting in early infancy. Frequently associated ocular abnormalities (often of later onset) include cataract, glaucoma, and corneal opacification and vascularization. Aniridia may occur either as an isolated ocular abnormality without systemic involvement, caused by mutation of PAX6 or deletion of a regulatory region controlling its expression, or as part of the Wilms tumor-aniridia-genital anomalies-retardation (WAGR) syndrome, with a deletion of 11p13 involving the PAX6 (aniridia) locus and the adjacent WT1 (Wilms tumor) locus. Individuals with deletion of PAX6 and WT1 are at up to a 50% risk of developing Wilms tumor. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
576337
Concept ID:
C0344542
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Ganglioside sialidase deficiency

Mucolipidosis IV is characterized by severe psychomotor delay evident by the end of the first year of life and slowly progressive visual impairment during the first decade as a result of a combination of corneal clouding and retinal degeneration. By the end of the first decade of life and certainly by their early teens, all individuals with typical mucolipidosis IV have severe visual impairment as a result of retinal degeneration. Neurodegeneration is thought to occur in no more than 15% of individuals. About 5% of individuals have atypical mucolipidosis IV, often manifest as less severe psychomotor retardation and/or eye findings. Although in the past, mucolipidosis IV was considered an Ashkenazi Jewish disease, currently most affected individuals are non-Ashkenazi Jewish. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
68663
Concept ID:
C0238286
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Atrophia bulborum hereditaria

NDP-related retinopathies are characterized by a spectrum of fibrous and vascular changes of the retina at birth that progress through childhood or adolescence to cause varying degrees of visual impairment. The most severe phenotype is described as Norrie disease (ND), characterized by greyish yellow fibrovascular masses (pseudogliomas) secondary to retinal vascular dysgenesis and detachment. Congenital blindness is almost always present. Approximately 30%-50% of males with ND have developmental delay/intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, or psychotic-like features. The majority of males with ND develop sensorineural hearing loss. Less severe phenotypes include: persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), characterized by a fibrotic white stalk from the optic disk to the lens; X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR), characterized by peripheral retinal vascular anomalies with or without fibrotic changes and retinal detachment; retinopathy of prematurity (ROP); and Coats disease, an exudative proliferative vasculopathy. Phenotypes can vary within families. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75615
Concept ID:
C0266526
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hurler syndrome

Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap; thus, affected individuals are best described as having either severe or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory-tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound. Hearing loss is common. Death, typically caused by cardiorespiratory failure, usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decades to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities can be present. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. Hearing loss and cardiac valvular disease are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Muscle eye brain disease

Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SELENON (SEPN1)-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
105341
Concept ID:
C0457133
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
8.

I cell disease

Mucolipidosis II (ML II, I-cell disease) is a slowly progressive inborn error of metabolism with clinical onset at birth and fatal outcome most often in early childhood. Postnatal growth is limited and often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Already in infancy skeletal radiographs reveal dysostosis multiplex. All children appear to have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Cockayne syndrome type A

Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or “moderate” form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome (COFS) or Pena-Shokeir syndrome type II; CS type III, a milder form; Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS). CS type I (moderate CS) is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II (severe CS or early-onset CS) is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age seven years. CS type III (mild CS or late-onset CS) is characterized by essentially normal growth and cognitive development or by late onset. Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, including intellectual disability, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS dysmyelination and calcifications. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155488
Concept ID:
C0751039
Disease or Syndrome
10.

X-linked ichthyosis with steryl-sulfatase deficiency

X-linked ichthyosis is clinically characterized by widespread, dark brown, polygonal scales and generalized dryness. Cutaneous manifestations are present soon after birth and usually do not improve with age. The histopathology of XLI typically shows compact hyperkeratosis and slight acanthosis with a normal granular layer (summary by Takeichi and Akiyama, 2016). X-linked ichthyosis is fundamentally the same disorder as placental steroid sulfatase deficiency, which is often first noted in the pregnant mother of affected males by decreased estrogen or delayed progression of parturition (Alperin and Shapiro, 1997). This is thus an example of affinity ('lumping') of phenotypes thought previously to be separate, the opposite of genetic heterogeneity. Schnyder (1970) gave a useful classification of the inherited ichthyoses. Hernandez-Martin et al. (1999) provided a comprehensive review of X-linked ichthyosis. They pointed out that among all genetic disorders X-linked ichthyosis shows one of the highest ratios of chromosomal deletions; complete deletion has been found in up to 90% of patients. Takeichi and Akiyama (2016) reviewed inherited nonsyndromic forms of ichthyosis. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
86937
Concept ID:
C0079588
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Combined deficiency of sialidase AND beta galactosidase

Galactosialidosis is a lysosomal storage disease associated with a combined deficiency of beta-galactosidase (611458) and neuraminidase (608272), secondary to a defect in protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). All patients have clinical manifestations typical of a lysosomal disorder, such as coarse facies, cherry red spots, vertebral changes, foam cells in the bone marrow, and vacuolated lymphocytes. Three phenotypic subtypes are recognized. The early infantile form is associated with fetal hydrops, edema, ascites, visceromegaly, skeletal dysplasia, and early death. The late infantile type is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, growth retardation, cardiac involvement, and rare occurrence of neurologic signs. The juvenile/adult form is characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, angiokeratoma, mental retardation, neurologic deterioration, absence of visceromegaly, and long survival. The majority of reported patients belong to the juvenile/adult group and are mainly of Japanese origin (summary by d'Azzo et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82779
Concept ID:
C0268233
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-B

Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal dysplasia and corneal clouding. There is no central nervous system involvement and intelligence is normal. There is increased urinary keratan sulfate excretion (Suzuki et al., 2001). See mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (253000), also known as Morquio syndrome A, a genetically distinct disorder with overlapping clinical features caused by mutation in the GALNS gene (612222) on chromosome 16q24. There may also be a nonkeratansulfate-excreting form of Morquio syndrome, so-called type C (252300). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
43376
Concept ID:
C0086652
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Pseudo-Hurler polydystrophy

Mucolipidosis alpha/beta (ML III alpha/beta; pseudo-Hurler polydystrophy), a slowly progressive disorder with clinical onset at approximately age three years, is characterized by slow growth rate and subnormal stature; radiographic evidence of mild to moderate dysostosis multiplex; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. If present, organomegaly is mild. Pain from osteoporosis that is clinically and radiologically apparent in childhood becomes more severe from adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10988
Concept ID:
C0033788
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Gangliosidosis GM1 type 3

GM1-gangliosidosis type III is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and mild skeletal changes. Age at onset ranges from 3 to 30 years. The disorder is less severe than GM1-gangliosidosis types I and II (230600). Type III shows extreme clinical variability, with some patients having only focal neurologic signs, such as dystonia, and others having more severe involvement with extrapyramidal signs and mental retardation. GLB1 enzymatic activity usually ranges from approximately 4 to 10% of control values (Suzuki et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
78655
Concept ID:
C0268273
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hereditary insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis

Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV), is characterized by insensitivity to pain, anhidrosis (the inability to sweat), and intellectual disability. The ability to sense all pain (including visceral pain) is absent, resulting in repeated injuries including: oral self-mutilation (biting of tongue, lips, and buccal mucosa); biting of fingertips; bruising, scarring, and infection of the skin; multiple bone fractures (many of which fail to heal properly); and recurrent joint dislocations resulting in joint deformity. Sense of touch, vibration, and position are normal. Anhidrosis predisposes to recurrent febrile episodes that are often the initial manifestation of CIPA. Hypothermia in cold environments also occurs. Intellectual disability of varying degree is observed in most affected individuals; hyperactivity and emotional lability are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
6915
Concept ID:
C0020074
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Fryns syndrome

Fryns syndrome is characterized by diaphragmatic defects (diaphragmatic hernia, eventration, hypoplasia or agenesis); characteristic facial appearance (coarse facies, ocular hypertelorism, broad and flat nasal bridge, thick nasal tip, long philtrum, low-set and poorly formed ears, tented upper lip, macrostomia, micrognathia); distal digital hypoplasia (nails, terminal phalanges); pulmonary hypoplasia; and associated anomalies (polyhydramnios, cloudy corneas and/or microphthalmia, orofacial clefting, renal dysplasia/renal cortical cysts, and/or malformations involving the brain, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitalia). Survival beyond the neonatal period has been rare. Data on postnatal growth and psychomotor development are limited; however, severe developmental delay and intellectual disability are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
65088
Concept ID:
C0220730
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Cockayne syndrome B

Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or “moderate” form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome (COFS) or Pena-Shokeir syndrome type II; CS type III, a milder form; Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS). CS type I (moderate CS) is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II (severe CS or early-onset CS) is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age seven years. CS type III (mild CS or late-onset CS) is characterized by essentially normal growth and cognitive development or by late onset. Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, including intellectual disability, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS dysmyelination and calcifications. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155487
Concept ID:
C0751038
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia

Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) resulting in short stature, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. Radiographic manifestations of SED include ovoid and mildly flattened vertebral bodies, small deformed capital femoral epiphyses, and shallow dysplastic acetabular fossae. Adult height is 136-157 cm for men and 98.5-143 cm for women. Nearly all affected individuals have progressive steroid-resistant nephropathy, usually developing within five years of the diagnosis of growth failure and terminating with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The majority of tested individuals have T-cell deficiency and an associated risk for opportunistic infection, a common cause of death. SIOD involves a spectrum that ranges from an infantile or severe early-onset form with death early in life to a juvenile or milder later-onset form with survival into adulthood if renal disease is appropriately treated. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
164078
Concept ID:
C0877024
Congenital Abnormality
20.

Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome

Roberts syndrome (RBS) is characterized by prenatal growth retardation (ranging from mild to severe), craniofacial findings (including microcephaly and cleft lip and/or palate) and limb malformations (including bilateral symmetric tetraphocomelia or hypomelia caused by mesomelic shortening). Upper limbs are more severely affected than lower limbs. Other limb malformations include oligodactyly with thumb aplasia or hypoplasia, syndactyly, clinodactyly, and elbow and knee flexion contractures. Craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and/or cleft palate, premaxillary prominence, micrognathia, microbrachycephaly, malar flattening, downslanted palpebral fissures, widely spaced eyes, exophthalmos resulting from shallow orbits, corneal clouding, underdeveloped ala nasi, beaked nose, and ear malformations. Intellectual disability is reported in the majority of affected individuals. Mortality is high among severely affected pregnancies and newborns. Mildly affected individuals may survive to adulthood. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
95931
Concept ID:
C0392475
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
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