Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 7

  • Wrong UID 505465
1.

Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a congenital multiple anomaly syndrome caused by an abnormality in cholesterol metabolism resulting from deficiency of the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) reductase. It is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and multiple major and minor malformations. The malformations include distinctive facial features, cleft palate, cardiac defects, underdeveloped external genitalia in males, postaxial polydactyly, and 2-3 syndactyly of the toes. The clinical spectrum is wide and individuals have been described with normal development and only minor malformations. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61231
Concept ID:
C0175694
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I

PMM2-CDG (CDG-Ia) (previously known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1a), the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three types: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The three types notwithstanding, clinical presentation and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly involved adults. Clinical presentations tend to be similar in sibs. In the infantile multisystem type, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay. Feeding problems, vomiting, failure to thrive, and impaired growth are frequently seen. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical presentations are observed: (1) a non-fatal neurologic form with strabismus, psychomotor retardation, and cerebellar hypoplasia in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade and (2) a neurologic-multivisceral form with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability type, with onset between age three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include seizures, stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability type, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, thoracic and spinal deformities progress, and premature aging is observed; females lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hyperglycemia-induced growth hormone release, hyperprolactinemia, insulin resistance, and coagulopathy may occur. An increased risk for deep venous thrombosis is present. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Infantile Refsum disease

Peroxisome biogenesis disorders, Zellweger syndrome spectrum (PBD, ZSS) is a continuum comprising three phenotypes — Zellweger syndrome (ZS), the most severe; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD); and infantile Refsum disease (IRD), the least severe — that were originally described before the biochemical and molecular bases of these disorders had been fully determined. Individuals with PBD, ZSS usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. In the newborn period, affected children are hypotonic, feed poorly, and have distinctive facies, seizures, and liver cysts with hepatic dysfunction. Bony stippling (chondrodysplasia punctata) of the patella(e) and other long bones may occur. Infants with ZS are significantly impaired and typically die during the first year of life, usually having made no developmental progress. Older children have retinal dystrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, developmental delay with hypotonia, and liver dysfunction. The clinical courses of NALD and IRD are variable and may include developmental delays, hearing loss, vision impairment, liver dysfunction, episodes of hemorrhage, and intracranial bleeding. While some children can be very hypotonic, others learn to walk and talk. The condition is often slowly progressive. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
79470
Concept ID:
C0282527
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Chylomicron retention disease

Chylomicron retention disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of severe fat malabsorption associated with failure to thrive in infancy (Dannoura et al., 1999). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
208651
Concept ID:
C0795956
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Potocki-Lupski syndrome

Potocki-Lupski syndrome is a developmental disorder characterized by hypotonia, failure to thrive, mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorders, and congenital anomalies. All reported cases have occurred sporadically without bias in the parental origin of rearrangements. Most duplications are 3.7 Mb in size and only identifiable by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis. Approximately 60% of PTLS patients harbor a microduplication of chromosome 17p11.2 reciprocal to the common recurrent 3.7-Mb microdeletion in SMS (summary by Shchelochkov et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
410082
Concept ID:
C1970482
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 1

Congenital defects of bile acid synthesis are autosomal recessive disorders characterized by neonatal onset of progressive liver disease with cholestatic jaundice and malabsorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins from the gastrointestinal tract resulting from a primary failure to synthesize bile acids. Affected infants show failure to thrive and secondary coagulopathy. In most forms of the disorder, there is a favorable response to oral bile acid therapy (summary by Cheng et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Defects in Bile Acid Synthesis There are several disorders that result from defects in bile acid synthesis. See CBAS2 (235555), caused by mutation in the delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase gene (AKR1D1; 604741) on chromosome 7q33; CBAS3 (613812), caused by mutation in the 7-alpha hydroxylase gene (CYP7B1; 603711) on chromosome 8q12; CBAS4 (214950), caused by mutation in the AMACR gene (604489) on chromosome 5p13; CBAS5 (616278), caused by mutation in the ABCD3 gene (170995) on chromosome 1p21; and CBAS6 (617308), caused by mutation in the ACOX2 gene (601641) on chromosome 3p14. See also progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC1; 211600), which has a similar phenotype. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335883
Concept ID:
C1843116
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Neuropathy, hereditary sensory, with spastic paraplegia, autosomal recessive

MedGen UID:
342492
Concept ID:
C1850395
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity

Support Center