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Items: 9

1.

Lysinuric protein intolerance

Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) typically presents after an infant is weaned from breast milk or formula; variable findings include recurrent vomiting and episodes of diarrhea, episodes of stupor and coma after a protein-rich meal, poor feeding, aversion to protein-rich food, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, and muscular hypotonia. Over time, findings include: poor growth, osteoporosis, involvement of the lungs (progressive interstitial changes, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis) and of the kidneys (progressive glomerular and proximal tubular disease), hematologic abnormalities (normochromic or hypochromic anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, erythroblastophagocytosis in the bone marrow aspirate), and a clinical presentation resembling the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis/macrophagic activation syndrome. Hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and acute pancreatitis can also be seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75704
Concept ID:
C0268647
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 2

Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is characterized by proliferation and infiltration of hyperactivated macrophages and T-lymphocytes manifesting as acute illness with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. Onset is typically within the first months or years of life and, on occasion, in utero, although later childhood or adult onset is more common than previously suspected. Neurologic abnormalities may be present initially or may develop later; they may include increased intracranial pressure, irritability, neck stiffness, hypotonia, hypertonia, convulsions, cranial nerve palsies, ataxia, hemiplegia, quadriplegia, blindness, and coma. Rash and lymphadenopathy are less common. Other findings include liver dysfunction and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. The median survival of children with typical FHL, without treatment, is less than two months; progression of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and infection account for the majority of deaths in untreated individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
400366
Concept ID:
C1863727
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Lymphoproliferative syndrome 2, X-linked

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) has two recognizable subtypes, XLP1 and XLP2. XLP1 is characterized predominantly by one of three commonly recognized phenotypes: Inappropriate immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or severe mononucleosis. Dysgammaglobulinemia. Lymphoproliferative disease (malignant lymphoma). XLP2 is most often characterized by HLH (often associated with EBV), dysgammaglobulinemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. HLH resulting from EBV infection is associated with an unregulated and exaggerated immune response with widespread proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, EBV-infected B cells, and macrophages. Dysgammaglobulinemia is typically hypogammaglobulinemia of one or more immunoglobulin subclasses. The malignant lymphomas are typically B-cell lymphomas, non-Hodgkin type, often extranodal, and in particular involving the intestine. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
336848
Concept ID:
C1845076
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 5

Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is characterized by proliferation and infiltration of hyperactivated macrophages and T-lymphocytes manifesting as acute illness with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. Onset is typically within the first months or years of life and, on occasion, in utero, although later childhood or adult onset is more common than previously suspected. Neurologic abnormalities may be present initially or may develop later; they may include increased intracranial pressure, irritability, neck stiffness, hypotonia, hypertonia, convulsions, cranial nerve palsies, ataxia, hemiplegia, quadriplegia, blindness, and coma. Rash and lymphadenopathy are less common. Other findings include liver dysfunction and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. The median survival of children with typical FHL, without treatment, is less than two months; progression of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and infection account for the majority of deaths in untreated individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
416514
Concept ID:
C2751293
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 3

Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is characterized by proliferation and infiltration of hyperactivated macrophages and T-lymphocytes manifesting as acute illness with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. Onset is typically within the first months or years of life and, on occasion, in utero, although later childhood or adult onset is more common than previously suspected. Neurologic abnormalities may be present initially or may develop later; they may include increased intracranial pressure, irritability, neck stiffness, hypotonia, hypertonia, convulsions, cranial nerve palsies, ataxia, hemiplegia, quadriplegia, blindness, and coma. Rash and lymphadenopathy are less common. Other findings include liver dysfunction and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. The median survival of children with typical FHL, without treatment, is less than two months; progression of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and infection account for the majority of deaths in untreated individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
332383
Concept ID:
C1837174
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 4

Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is characterized by proliferation and infiltration of hyperactivated macrophages and T-lymphocytes manifesting as acute illness with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. Onset is typically within the first months or years of life and, on occasion, in utero, although later childhood or adult onset is more common than previously suspected. Neurologic abnormalities may be present initially or may develop later; they may include increased intracranial pressure, irritability, neck stiffness, hypotonia, hypertonia, convulsions, cranial nerve palsies, ataxia, hemiplegia, quadriplegia, blindness, and coma. Rash and lymphadenopathy are less common. Other findings include liver dysfunction and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. The median survival of children with typical FHL, without treatment, is less than two months; progression of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and infection account for the majority of deaths in untreated individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
350245
Concept ID:
C1863728
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is characterized by proliferation and infiltration of hyperactivated macrophages and T-lymphocytes manifesting as acute illness with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. Onset is typically within the first months or years of life and, on occasion, in utero, although later childhood or adult onset is more common than previously suspected. Neurologic abnormalities may be present initially or may develop later; they may include increased intracranial pressure, irritability, neck stiffness, hypotonia, hypertonia, convulsions, cranial nerve palsies, ataxia, hemiplegia, quadriplegia, blindness, and coma. Rash and lymphadenopathy are less common. Other findings include liver dysfunction and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. The median survival of children with typical FHL, without treatment, is less than two months; progression of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and infection account for the majority of deaths in untreated individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78797
Concept ID:
C0272199
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Lymphoproliferative syndrome 2

Lymphoproliferative syndrome-2, also known as CD27 deficiency, is an autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder associated with persistent symptomatic EBV viremia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and impairment in specific antibody function resulting from impaired T cell-dependent B-cell responses and T-cell dysfunction (summary by van Montfrans et al., 2012). The phenotype can vary significantly, from asymptomatic borderline-low hypogammaglobulinemia, to a full-blown symptomatic systemic inflammatory response with life-threatening EBV-related complications, including hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a lymphoproliferative disorder, and malignant lymphoma requiring stem cell transplantation (summary by Salzer et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
767454
Concept ID:
C3554540
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hemophagocytosis

Phagocytosis by macrophages of erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and their precursors in bone marrow and other tissues. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
163750
Concept ID:
C0876991
Disease or Syndrome
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