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1.

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by the association of gastrointestinal polyposis, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and cancer predisposition. Peutz-Jeghers-type hamartomatous polyps are most common in the small intestine (in order of prevalence: in the jejunum, ileum, and duodenum) but can also occur in the stomach, large bowel, and extraintestinal sites including the renal pelvis, bronchus, gall bladder, nasal passages, urinary bladder, and ureters. Gastrointestinal polyps can result in chronic bleeding and anemia and also cause recurrent obstruction and intussusception requiring repeated laparotomy and bowel resection. Mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation presents in childhood as dark blue to dark brown macules around the mouth, eyes, and nostrils, in the perianal area, and on the buccal mucosa. Hyperpigmented macules on the fingers are common. The macules may fade in puberty and adulthood. Individuals with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome are at increased risk for a wide variety of epithelial malignancies (colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, breast, and ovarian cancers). Females are at risk for sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTAT), a benign neoplasm of the ovaries, and adenoma malignum of the cervix, a rare aggressive cancer. Males occasionally develop large calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCST) of the testes, which secrete estrogen and can lead to gynecomastia, advanced skeletal age, and ultimately short stature, if untreated. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18404
Concept ID:
C0031269
Disease or Syndrome
2.

21-hydroxylase deficiency

21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a family of autosomal recessive disorders involving impaired synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. In 21-OHD CAH, excessive adrenal androgen biosynthesis results in virilization in all individuals and salt wasting in some individuals. A classic form with severe enzyme deficiency and prenatal onset of virilization is distinguished from a non-classic form with mild enzyme deficiency and postnatal onset. The classic form is further divided into the simple virilizing form (~25% of affected individuals) and the salt-wasting form, in which aldosterone production is inadequate (=75% of individuals). Newborns with salt-wasting 21-OHD CAH are at risk for life-threatening salt-wasting crises. Individuals with the non-classic form of 21-OHD CAH present postnatally with signs of hyperandrogenism; females with the non-classic form are not virilized at birth. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
468578
Concept ID:
C0852654
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Androgen resistance syndrome

Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is typically characterized by evidence of feminization (i.e., undermasculinization) of the external genitalia at birth, abnormal secondary sexual development in puberty, and infertility in individuals with a 46,XY karyotype. AIS represents a spectrum of defects in androgen action and can be subdivided into three broad phenotypes: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), with typical female external genitalia. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) with predominantly female, predominantly male, or ambiguous external genitalia. Mild androgen insensitivity syndrome (MAIS) with typical male external genitalia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21102
Concept ID:
C0039585
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Kallmann syndrome 2

Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
289648
Concept ID:
C1563720
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Kallmann syndrome 1

Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
295872
Concept ID:
C1563719
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Bulbo-spinal atrophy X-linked

Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a gradually progressive neuromuscular disorder in which degeneration of lower motor neurons results in muscle weakness, muscle atrophy, and fasciculations. SBMA occurs only in males. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
333282
Concept ID:
C1839259
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Alstrom syndrome

Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive sensorineural hearing impairment, dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy, the insulin resistance syndrome, and multiple organ failure. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals. Hearing loss may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to type 2 diabetes in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate associated dyslipidemia. Other endocrine abnormalities can include hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in boys, and polycystic ovaries in girls. More than 60% of individuals with Alström syndrome develop cardiac failure as a result of dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy. About 50% of individuals have delay in early developmental milestones; intelligence is normal. Liver involvement includes elevation of transaminases, steatosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and steatohepatitis. Portal hypertension and cirrhosis can lead to hepatic encephalopathy and life-threatening esophageal varices. Pulmonary dysfunction and severe renal disease may also develop. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) can occur as early as the late teens. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 7 with or without anosmia

Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82883
Concept ID:
C0271623
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Cowden syndrome

Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley syndrome (BRRS; 153480) share clinical characteristics such as hamartomatous polyps of the gastrointestinal tract, mucocutaneous lesions, and increased risk of developing neoplasms. Furthermore, both conditions and several other distinctive phenotypes are caused by mutations in the PTEN gene. For this reason Marsh et al. (1999) suggested that the spectrum of disorders be referred to as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS). Approximately 80% of CS patients have PTEN mutations (Blumenthal and Dennis, 2008). Some patients with Cowden syndrome may have immune system defects resulting in increased susceptibility to infections (summary by Browning et al., 2015). Blumenthal and Dennis (2008) provided a detailed review of PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes. Genetic Heterogeneity of Cowden Syndrome Also see Cowden syndrome-2 (CWS2; 612359), caused by mutation in the SDHB gene (185470) on chromosome 1p36; CWS3 (615106), caused by mutation in the SDHD gene (602690) on chromosome 11q23; CWS4 (615107), caused by hypermethylation of the promoter of the KLLN gene (612105), which shares the same transcription site as the PTEN gene, on chromosome 10q23; CWS5 (615108), caused by mutation in the PIK3CA gene (171834) on chromosome 3q26; CWS6 (615109), caused by mutation in the AKT1 gene (164730) on chromosome 14q32; and CWS7 (616858), caused by mutation in the SEC23B gene (610512) on chromosome 20p11.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
5420
Concept ID:
C0018553
Neoplastic Process
10.

Deficiency of steroid 17-alpha-monooxygenase

17 alpha(a)-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency is a condition that affects the function of certain hormone-producing glands called the gonads (ovaries in females and testes in males) and the adrenal glands. The gonads direct sexual development before birth and during puberty and are important for reproduction. The adrenal glands, which are located on top of the kidneys, regulate the production of certain hormones, including those that control salt levels in the body. People with 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency have an imbalance of many of the hormones that are made in these glands. 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency is one of a group of disorders, known as congenital adrenal hyperplasias, that impair hormone production and disrupt sexual development and maturation.Hormone imbalances lead to the characteristic signs and symptoms of 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency, which include high blood pressure (hypertension), low levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia), and abnormal sexual development. The severity of the features varies. Two forms of the condition are recognized: complete 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency, which is more severe, and partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency, which is typically less so.Males and females are affected by disruptions to sexual development differently. Females (who have two X chromosomes) with 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency are born with normal external female genitalia; however, the internal reproductive organs, including the uterus and ovaries, may be underdeveloped. Women with complete 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency do not develop secondary sex characteristics, such as breasts and pubic hair, and do not menstruate (amenorrhea). Women with partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency may develop some secondary sex characteristics; menstruation is typically irregular or absent. Either form of the disorder results in an inability to conceive a baby (infertility).In affected individuals who are chromosomally male (having an X and a Y chromosome), problems with sexual development lead to abnormalities of the external genitalia. The most severely affected are born with characteristically female external genitalia and are generally raised as females. However, because they do not have female internal reproductive organs, these individuals have amenorrhea and do not develop female secondary sex characteristics. These individuals have testes, but they are abnormally located in the abdomen (undescended). Sometimes, complete 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency leads to external genitalia that do not look clearly male or clearly female (ambiguous genitalia). Males with partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency usually have abnormal male genitalia, such as a small penis (micropenis), the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias), or a scrotum divided into two lobes (bifid scrotum). Males with either complete or partial 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency are also infertile.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
82782
Concept ID:
C0268285
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome

MedGen UID:
78557
Concept ID:
C0265339
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Leptin deficiency or dysfunction

Congenital leptin deficiency is a condition that causes severe obesity beginning in the first few months of life. Affected individuals are of normal weight at birth, but they are constantly hungry and quickly gain weight. Without treatment, the extreme hunger continues and leads to chronic excessive eating (hyperphagia) and obesity. Beginning in early childhood, affected individuals develop abnormal eating behaviors such as fighting with other children over food, hoarding food, and eating in secret.People with congenital leptin deficiency also have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which is a condition caused by reduced production of hormones that direct sexual development. Without treatment, affected individuals experience delayed puberty or do not go through puberty, and may be unable to conceive children (infertile). [from GHR]

MedGen UID:
767138
Concept ID:
C3554224
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Proteus-like syndrome

MedGen UID:
356222
Concept ID:
C1866398
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 8 with or without anosmia

Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766755
Concept ID:
C3553841
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

Individuals with androgen insensitivity have a 46,XY karyotype and testes that produce age-appropriate androgen levels but have undermasculinized external genitalia due to defects in androgen action. The phenotype in PAIS varies depending on residual androgen receptor function, ranging from severe undermasculinization presenting as female-like external genitalia to male-appearing genitalia. The typical presentation comprises micropenis, severe hypospadias, and bifid scrotum with or without cryptorchidism (summary by Mongan et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82785
Concept ID:
C0268301
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Testosterone 17-beta-dehydrogenase deficiency

17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency is a condition that affects male sexual development. People with this condition are genetically male, with one X and one Y chromosome in each cell, and they have male gonads (testes). Their bodies, however, do not produce enough of the male sex hormone testosterone. Testosterone has a critical role in male sexual development, and a shortage of this hormone disrupts the formation of the external sex organs before birth.Most people with 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency are born with external genitalia that appear female. In some cases, the external genitalia do not look clearly male or clearly female (sometimes called ambiguous genitalia). Still other affected infants have genitalia that appear predominantly male, often with an unusually small penis (micropenis) or the urethra opening on the underside of the penis (hypospadias).During puberty, people with this condition develop some secondary sex characteristics, such as increased muscle mass, deepening of the voice, and development of male pattern body hair. The penis and scrotum (the sac of skin that holds the testes) grow larger during this period. In addition to these changes typical of adolescent boys, some affected males may also experience breast enlargement (gynecomastia). Men with this disorder are generally unable to father children (infertile).Children with 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency are often raised as girls. About half of these individuals adopt a male gender role in adolescence or early adulthood.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
120626
Concept ID:
C0268296
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 9 with or without anosmia

Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is characterized by inappropriately low serum concentrations of the gonadotropins LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) in the presence of low circulating concentrations of sex steroids. IGD is associated with a normal sense of smell (normosmic IGD) in approximately 40% of affected individuals and an impaired sense of smell (Kallmann syndrome) in approximately 60%. IGD can first become apparent in infancy, adolescence, or adulthood. Infant boys with congenital IGD often have micropenis and cryptorchidism. Adolescents and adults with IGD have clinical evidence of hypogonadism and incomplete sexual maturation on physical examination. Adult males with IGD tend to have prepubertal testicular volume (i.e., <4 mL), absence of secondary sexual features (e.g., facial and axillary hair growth, deepening of the voice), decreased muscle mass, diminished libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Adult females have little or no breast development and primary amenorrhea. Although skeletal maturation is delayed, the rate of linear growth is usually normal except for the absence of a distinct pubertal growth spurt. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
766756
Concept ID:
C3553842
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Isolated lutropin deficiency

Male patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to isolated luteinizing hormone (LH) deficiency have normal sexual differentiation but fail to develop spontaneous puberty. Absence of LH alters Leydig cell proliferation and maturation and impairs the onset of normal spermatogenesis, which requires high levels of intratesticular testosterone. Infertility and very low levels of spermatogenesis generally persist in affected men despite long-term exposure to gonadotropin therapy. Female patients exhibit normal pubertal development and menarche, followed by oligomenorrhea and anovulatory secondary amenorrhea (summary by Basciani et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, see 147950. Reviews Arnhold et al. (2009) noted that the clinical manifestations of female patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to mutations in LHB are very similar to those of women with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism due to inactivating mutations of the LH receptor (see 238320): all have female external genitalia, spontaneous development of normal pubic hair and breasts at puberty, and normal to late menarche followed by oligoamenorrhea and infertility. Pelvic ultrasound shows a small or normal uterus and normal or enlarged ovaries with cysts. However, women with LHB mutations can be treated with luteinizing hormone or chorionic gonadotropin (CG; 118860) replacement therapy; women with LH receptor mutations are resistant to LH, and no treatment is effective in recovering their fertility. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82881
Concept ID:
C0271582
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Lhermitte-Duclos disease

MedGen UID:
140251
Concept ID:
C0391826
Neoplastic Process
20.

Wilson-Turner X-linked mental retardation syndrome

Wilson-Turner syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurologic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, dysmorphic facial features, hypogonadism, short stature, and truncal obesity. Females are unaffected (Wilson et al., 1991). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333393
Concept ID:
C1839736
Disease or Syndrome
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