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2.

Hb SS disease

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by intermittent vaso-occlusive events and chronic hemolytic anemia. Vaso-occlusive events result in tissue ischemia leading to acute and chronic pain as well as organ damage that can affect any organ in the body, including the bones, lungs, liver, kidneys, brain, eyes, and joints. Dactylitis (pain and/or swelling of the hands or feet) in infants and young children is often the earliest manifestation of sickle cell disease. In children the spleen can become engorged with blood cells in a “splenic sequestration.” The spleen is particularly subject to infarction and the majority of individuals with SCD are functionally asplenic in early childhood, increasing their risk for certain types of bacterial infections. Chronic hemolysis can result in varying degrees of anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis, and delayed growth and sexual maturation. Individuals with the highest rates of hemolysis are predisposed to pulmonary artery hypertension, priapism, and leg ulcers but may be relatively protected from vaso-occlusive pain. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
287
Concept ID:
C0002895
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a growth disorder variably characterized by neonatal hypoglycemia, macrosomia, macroglossia, hemihyperplasia, omphalocele, embryonal tumors (e.g., Wilms tumor, hepatoblastoma, neuroblastoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma), visceromegaly, adrenocortical cytomegaly, renal abnormalities (e.g., medullary dysplasia, nephrocalcinosis, medullary sponge kidney, and nephromegaly), and ear creases/pits. BWS is considered a clinical spectrum, in which affected individuals may have many of these features or may have only one or two clinical features. Early death may occur from complications of prematurity, hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, macroglossia, or tumors. However, the previously reported mortality of 20% is likely an overestimate given better recognition of the disorder along with enhanced treatment options. Macroglossia and macrosomia are generally present at birth but may have postnatal onset. Growth rate slows around age seven to eight years. Hemihyperplasia may affect segmental regions of the body or selected organs and tissues. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2562
Concept ID:
C0004903
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Glycogen storage disease, type II

Pompe disease is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD; individuals with onset before age 12 months with cardiomyopathy) may be apparent in utero but more typically onset is at the median age of four months with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), IOPD commonly results in death by age two years from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction and respiratory insufficiency. Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD; including: (a) individuals with onset before age 12 months without cardiomyopathy; and (b) all individuals with onset after age 12 months) is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hemochromatosis type 1

HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE-HH) is characterized by inappropriately high absorption of iron by the gastrointestinal mucosa. The phenotypic spectrum of HFE-HH is now recognized to include: Those with clinical HFE-HH, in which manifestations of end-organ damage secondary to iron storage are present; Those with biochemical HFE-HH, in which the only evidence of iron overload is increased transferrin-iron saturation and increased serum ferritin concentration; Non-expressing p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes, in whom neither clinical manifestations of HFE-HH nor iron overload is present. Clinical HFE-HH is characterized by excessive storage of iron in the liver, skin, pancreas, heart, joints, and testes. In untreated individuals, early symptoms may include: abdominal pain, weakness, lethargy, and weight loss; the risk of cirrhosis is significantly increased when the serum ferritin is higher than 1,000 ng/mL; other findings may include progressive increase in skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and/or arrhythmias, arthritis, and hypogonadism. Clinical HFE-HH is more common in men than women. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140272
Concept ID:
C0392514
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Clinical manifestations usually occur in an individual with a concurrent febrile or gastrointestinal illness when energy demands are increased; onset of symptoms is usually rapid. The recognized phenotypes are: acute fatty liver of pregnancy, in which the fetus has biallelic pathogenic variants in CPT1A that causes CPT1A deficiency; and hepatic encephalopathy, in which individuals (typically children) present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and sudden onset of liver failure. Individuals with hepatic encephalopathy typically present with hypoglycemia, absent or low levels of ketones, and elevated serum concentrations of liver transaminases, ammonia, and total carnitine. Between episodes of hepatic encephalopathy, individuals appear developmentally and cognitively normal unless previous metabolic decompensation has resulted in neurologic damage. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87461
Concept ID:
C0342789
7.

Amyloidogenic transthyretin amyloidosis

Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is characterized by a slowly progressive peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy as well as non-neuropathic changes of cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities, and CNS amyloidosis. The disease usually begins in the third to fifth decade in persons from endemic foci in Portugal and Japan; onset is later in persons from other areas. Typically, sensory neuropathy starts in the lower extremities with paresthesias and hypesthesias of the feet, followed within a few years by motor neuropathy. In some persons, particularly those with early onset disease, autonomic neuropathy is the first manifestation of the condition; findings can include: orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, attacks of nausea and vomiting, delayed gastric emptying, sexual impotence, anhidrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Cardiac amyloidosis is mainly characterized by progressive cardiomyopathy. Individuals with leptomeningeal amyloidosis may have the following CNS findings: dementia, psychosis, visual impairment, headache, seizures, motor paresis, ataxia, myelopathy, hydrocephalus, or intracranial hemorrhage. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
414031
Concept ID:
C2751492
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Renal carnitine transport defect

Systemic primary carnitine deficiency (CDSP) is a disorder of the carnitine cycle that results in defective fatty acid oxidation. It encompasses a broad clinical spectrum including: Metabolic decompensation in infancy typically presenting between age three months and two years with episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia, poor feeding, irritability, lethargy, hepatomegaly, elevated liver transaminases, and hyperammonemia triggered by fasting or common illnesses such as upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis; Childhood myopathy involving heart and skeletal muscle with onset between age two and four years; Pregnancy-related decreased stamina or exacerbation of cardiac arrhythmia; Fatigability in adulthood; Absence of symptoms. The latter two categories often include mothers diagnosed with CDSP after newborn screening has identified low carnitine levels in their infants. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
90999
Concept ID:
C0342788
Disease or Syndrome
9.

I cell disease

Mucolipidosis II (ML II, I-cell disease) is a slowly progressive inborn error of metabolism with clinical onset at birth and fatal outcome most often in early childhood. Postnatal growth is limited and often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Already in infancy skeletal radiographs reveal dysostosis multiplex. All children appear to have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Sandhoff disease

Sandhoff disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an accumulation of GM2 gangliosides, particularly in neurons, and is clinically indistinguishable from Tay-Sachs disease (272800). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
11313
Concept ID:
C0036161
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Phytanic acid storage disease

Refsum disease is characterized by anosmia and early-onset retinitis pigmentosa, which are both universal findings with variable combinations of neuropathy, deafness, ataxia, and ichthyosis. Onset of symptoms ranges from age seven months to older than age 50 years. Cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure caused by cardiomyopathy are potentially severe health problems which develop later in life. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
11161
Concept ID:
C0034960
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Danon disease

Danon disease is an X-linked dominant disorder predominantly affecting cardiac muscle. Skeletal muscle involvement and mental retardation are variable features. The accumulation of glycogen in muscle and lysosomes originally led to the classification of Danon disease as a variant of glycogen storage disease II (Pompe disease; 232300) with 'normal acid maltase' or alpha-glucosidase (GAA; 606800) (Danon et al., 1981). However, Nishino et al. (2000) stated that Danon disease is not a glycogen storage disease because glycogen is not always increased. Sugie et al. (2005) classified Danon disease as a form of autophagic vacuolar myopathy, characterized by intracytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles with sarcolemmal features. The characteristic vacuole is believed to be an autolysosome surrounded by secondarily-generated membranes containing sarcolemmal proteins, basal lamina, and acetylcholinesterase activity. X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA; 310440) is a distinct disorder with similar pathologic features. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
209235
Concept ID:
C0878677
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Sialidosis, type II

Sialidosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the progressive lysosomal storage of sialylated glycopeptides and oligosaccharides caused by a deficiency of the enzyme neuraminidase. Common to the sialidoses is the accumulation and/or excretion of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) covalently linked ('bound') to a variety of oligosaccharides and/or glycoproteins (summary by Lowden and O'Brien, 1979). The sialidoses are distinct from the sialurias in which there is storage and excretion of 'free' sialic acid, rather than 'bound' sialic acid; neuraminidase activity in sialuria is normal or elevated. Salla disease (604369) is a form of 'free' sialic acid disease. Classification Lowden and O'Brien (1979) provided a logical nosology of neuraminidase deficiency into sialidosis type I and type II. Type I is the milder form, also known as the 'normosomatic' type or the cherry red spot-myoclonus syndrome. Sialidosis type II is the more severe form with an earlier onset, and is also known as the 'dysmorphic' type. Type II has been subdivided into juvenile and infantile forms. Other terms for sialidosis type II are mucolipidosis I and lipomucopolysaccharidosis. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120621
Concept ID:
C0268226
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-B

Sanfilippo syndrome B is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the accumulation of heparan sulfate. Clinically, patients have progressive neurodegeneration, behavioral problems, mild skeletal changes, and shortened life span. The clinical severity ranges from mild to severe (Chinen et al., 2005). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Sanfilippo syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis III, see MPS IIIA (252900). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
88601
Concept ID:
C0086648
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency, infantile

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
322211
Concept ID:
C1833511
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Fucosidosis

Fucosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by defective alpha-L-fucosidase with accumulation of fucose in the tissues. Clinical features include angiokeratoma, progressive psychomotor retardation, neurologic signs, coarse facial features, and dysostosis multiplex. Fucosidosis has been classified into 2 major types. Type 1 is characterized by rapid psychomotor regression and severe neurologic deterioration beginning at about 6 months of age, elevated sweat sodium chloride, and death within the first decade of life. Type 2 is characterized by milder psychomotor retardation and neurologic signs, the development of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum, normal sweat salinity, and longer survival (Kousseff et al., 1976). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
5288
Concept ID:
C0016788
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency, lethal neonatal

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical presentations are lethal neonatal form, severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and myopathic form (which is usually mild and can manifest from infancy to adulthood). While the former two are severe multisystemic diseases characterized by liver failure with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, seizures, and early death, the latter is characterized by exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness, sometimes associated with myoglobinuria. The myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is the most common disorder of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle and the most frequent cause of hereditary myoglobinuria. Males are more likely to be affected than females. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
318896
Concept ID:
C1833518
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Gaucher disease, perinatal lethal

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
374996
Concept ID:
C1842704
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Sialic acid storage disease, severe infantile type

The allelic disorders of free sialic acid metabolism — Salla disease, intermediate severe Salla disease, and infantile free sialic acid storage disease (ISSD) — are neurodegenerative disorders resulting from increased lysosomal storage of free sialic acid. The mildest phenotype is Salla disease, which is characterized by normal appearance and neurologic findings at birth followed by slowly progressive neurologic deterioration resulting in mild to moderate psychomotor retardation, spasticity, athetosis, and epileptic seizures. The most severe phenotype is ISSD, characterized by severe developmental delay, coarse facial features, hepatosplenomegaly, and cardiomegaly; death usually occurs in early childhood. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
203367
Concept ID:
C1096902
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Hypertrichotic osteochondrodysplasia

Cantú syndrome and the related disorders acromegaloid facial appearance (AFA) and hypertrichosis and acromegaloid facial features (HAFF) are characterized by congenital hypertrichosis; distinctive coarse facial features (including broad nasal bridge, wide mouth with full lips and macroglossia); enlarged heart (increased ventricular mass, enlarged chambers, and normal cardiac function); and skeletal abnormalities (thickening of the calvaria, broad ribs, scoliosis, and flaring of the metaphyses). Other cardiovascular abnormalities may include patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (in 50%), pericardial effusion (20%), and increased vascular tortuosity. Intellect is typically normal; behavioral problems can include anxiety, mood swings, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and tics. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
208647
Concept ID:
C0795905
Disease or Syndrome
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