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Items: 10

  • Wrong UID 425283
1.

Steinert myotonic dystrophy syndrome

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystem disorder that affects skeletal and smooth muscle as well as the eye, heart, endocrine system, and central nervous system. The clinical findings, which span a continuum from mild to severe, have been categorized into three somewhat overlapping phenotypes: mild, classic, and congenital. Mild DM1 is characterized by cataract and mild myotonia (sustained muscle contraction); life span is normal. Classic DM1 is characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, myotonia, cataract, and often cardiac conduction abnormalities; adults may become physically disabled and may have a shortened life span. Congenital DM1 is characterized by hypotonia and severe generalized weakness at birth, often with respiratory insufficiency and early death; intellectual disability is common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10239
Concept ID:
C0027126
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1A

LMNA-related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is caused by pathogenic variants in LMNA and is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and/or reduced systolic function preceded or accompanied by significant conduction system disease and/or arrhythmias. LMNA-related DCM usually presents in early to mid-adulthood with symptomatic conduction system disease or arrhythmias, or with symptomatic DCM including heart failure or embolus from a left ventricular mural thrombus. Sudden cardiac death can occur, and in some instances is the presenting manifestation; sudden cardiac death may occur with minimal or no systolic dysfunction. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
258500
Concept ID:
C1449563
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1E

Nonsyndromic isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction, a reduction in the myocardial force of contraction. DCM usually presents with any one of the following: Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion). Arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease. Thromboembolic disease (from left ventricular mural thrombus) including stroke. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
331341
Concept ID:
C1832680
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Brugada syndrome 7

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST-segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on ECG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood although age at diagnosis may range from infancy to late adulthood. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and the sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
413472
Concept ID:
C2751088
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Atrial fibrillation, familial, 10

Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462814
Concept ID:
C3151464
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Mental retardation, X-linked, syndromic 32

MedGen UID:
763827
Concept ID:
C3550913
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Cardiac conduction disease with or without dilated cardiomyopathy

MedGen UID:
863722
Concept ID:
C4015285
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Atrial fibrillation, familial, 15

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia characterized by uncoordinated atrial activation with consequent deterioration of atrial mechanical function. It is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, and its prevalence increases as the population ages. An estimated 70,000 strokes each year are caused by atrial fibrillation (summary by Oberti et al., 2004). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
862706
Concept ID:
C4014269
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Lymphedema, cardiac septal defects, and characteristic facies

MedGen UID:
383042
Concept ID:
C2677167
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia

Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia (CAID) is a disorder affecting the heart and the digestive system. CAID disrupts the normal rhythm of the heartbeat; affected individuals have a heart rhythm abnormality called sick sinus syndrome. The disorder also impairs the rhythmic muscle contractions that propel food through the intestines (peristalsis), causing a digestive condition called intestinal pseudo-obstruction. The heart and digestive issues develop at the same time, usually by age 20.Sick sinus syndrome (also known as sinus node dysfunction) is an abnormality of the sinoatrial (SA) node, which is an area of specialized cells in the heart that functions as a natural pacemaker. The SA node generates electrical impulses that start each heartbeat. These signals travel from the SA node to the rest of the heart, signaling the heart (cardiac) muscle to contract and pump blood. In people with sick sinus syndrome, the SA node does not function normally, which usually causes the heartbeat to be too slow (bradycardia), although occasionally the heartbeat is too fast (tachycardia) or rapidly switches from being too fast to being too slow (tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome). Symptoms related to abnormal heartbeats can include dizziness, light-headedness, fainting (syncope), a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), and confusion or memory problems. During exercise, many affected individuals experience chest pain, difficulty breathing, or excessive tiredness (fatigue).In intestinal pseudo-obstruction, impairment of peristalsis leads to a buildup of partially digested food in the intestines, abdominal swelling (distention) and pain, nausea, vomiting, and constipation or diarrhea. Affected individuals experience loss of appetite and impaired ability to absorb nutrients, which may lead to malnutrition. These symptoms resemble those caused by an intestinal blockage (obstruction) such as a tumor, but in intestinal pseudo-obstruction no such blockage is found.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
863911
Concept ID:
C4015474
Disease or Syndrome
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