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1.

Marfan syndrome

Marfan syndrome, a systemic disorder of connective tissue with a high degree of clinical variability, comprises a broad phenotypic continuum ranging from mild (features of Marfan syndrome in one or a few systems) to severe and rapidly progressive neonatal multiorgan disease. Cardinal manifestations involve the ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems. Ocular findings include myopia (the most common ocular feature); ectopia lentis (seen in approximately 60% of affected individuals); and an increased risk for retinal detachment, glaucoma, and early cataracts. Skeletal system manifestations include bone overgrowth and joint laxity; disproportionately long extremities for the size of the trunk (dolichostenomelia); overgrowth of the ribs that can push the sternum in (pectus excavatum) or out (pectus carinatum); and scoliosis that ranges from mild to severe and progressive. The major morbidity and early mortality in the Marfan syndrome relate to the cardiovascular system and include dilatation of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva (predisposing to aortic tear and rupture), mitral valve prolapse with or without regurgitation, tricuspid valve prolapse, and enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery. Severe and prolonged regurgitation of the mitral and/or aortic valve can predispose to left ventricular dysfunction and occasionally heart failure. With proper management, the life expectancy of someone with Marfan syndrome approximates that of the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
44287
Concept ID:
C0024796
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), classic type is a connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility, abnormal wound healing, and joint hypermobility. It includes two previously designated subtypes (EDS type I and EDS type II) that are now recognized to form a continuum of clinical findings. The skin is smooth, velvety to the touch, and hyperelastic; i.e., it extends easily and snaps back after release (unlike lax, redundant skin, as in cutis laxa). The skin is fragile, as manifested by splitting of the dermis following relatively minor trauma, especially over pressure points (knees, elbows) and areas prone to trauma (shins, forehead, chin). Wound healing is delayed, and stretching of scars after apparently successful primary wound healing is characteristic. Complications of joint hypermobility, such as dislocations of the shoulder, patella, digits, hip, radius, and clavicle, usually resolve spontaneously or are easily managed by the affected individual. Other features include hypotonia with delayed motor development, fatigue and muscle cramps, and easy bruising. Less common findings include mitral and tricuspid valve prolapse, aortic root dilatation, and spontaneous rupture of large arteries. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78660
Concept ID:
C0268335
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Congenital contractural arachnodactyly

Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is characterized by a Marfan-like appearance (tall, slender habitus in which arm span exceeds height) and long, slender fingers and toes (arachnodactyly). Most affected individuals have "crumpled" ears that present as a folded upper helix of the external ear and most have contractures of major joints (knees and ankles) at birth. The proximal interphalangeal joints also have flexion contractures (i.e., camptodactyly), as do the toes. Hip contractures, adducted thumbs, and club foot may occur. The majority of affected individuals have muscular hypoplasia. Contractures usually improve with time. Kyphosis/scoliosis is present in about half of all affected individuals. It begins as early as infancy, is progressive, and causes the greatest morbidity in CCA. Dilatation of the aorta is occasionally present. Infants have been observed with a severe/lethal form characterized by multiple cardiovascular and gastrointestinal anomalies in addition to the typical skeletal findings. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
67391
Concept ID:
C0220668
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Marfan lipodystrophy syndrome

Marfan lipodystrophy syndrome is characterized by congenital lipodystrophy, premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to weight gain, and progeroid appearance with distinct facial features, including proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, and retrognathia. Other characteristic features include arachnodactyly, digital hyperextensibility, myopia, dural ectasia, and normal psychomotor development (Takenouchi et al., 2013). Takenouchi et al. (2013) noted phenotypic overlap with Marfan syndrome (154700) and Shprintzen-Goldberg craniosynostosis syndrome (182212). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934763
Concept ID:
C4310796
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Marfanoid habitus with situs inversus

MedGen UID:
323046
Concept ID:
C1836994
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Zimmermann-Laband syndrome

A syndrome of gingival fibromatosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and anomalies of the nose, bones, and nails, occasionally associated with mental retardation. [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
208656
Concept ID:
C0796013
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Aortic root dilatation

MedGen UID:
116069
Concept ID:
C0238669
Disease or Syndrome
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