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1.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, generalized, with severe palmoplantar keratosis

MedGen UID:
864673
Concept ID:
C4016236
Finding
2.
3.

EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA SIMPLEX, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE 1

MedGen UID:
811576
Concept ID:
C3715082
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Dowling-Degos disease 1

Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by reticular pigmentation, usually in a flexural distribution. However, generalized DDD can also occur, with numerous hypopigmented or erythematous macules and papules on the neck, chest, and abdomen. The histopathology of DDD shows characteristic thin branch-like patterns of epidermal downgrowth (summary by Li et al., 2013). Review of Reticulate Pigment Disorders Muller et al. (2012) reviewed the spectrum of reticulate pigment disorders of the skin, tabulating all reported cases of patients with Dowling-Degos disease, reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura (RAK; 615537), reticulate acropigmentation of Dohi (RAD; 127400), Galli-Galli disease (GGD), and Haber syndrome (HS). Of 82 cases, 26 (31.7%) were clinically diagnosed as DDD, 13 (15.9%) as RAD, 11 (13.4%) as GGD, 8 (9.8%) as RAK, and 8 (9.8%) as HS; in addition, 16 (19.5%) of the cases showed overlap between DDD and RAK. Muller et al. (2012) also published photographs of an affected individual exhibiting an overlap of clinical features of DDD, GGD, RAD, and RAK. The authors noted that in reticulate disorders of the skin, the main disease entity is DDD, with a subset of cases exhibiting acantholysis (GGD), facial erythema (HS), or an acral distribution (RAD; RAK). Muller et al. (2012) concluded that all reticulate pigment diseases of the skin are varying manifestations of a single entity. Genetic Heterogeneity of Reticulate Pigment Disorders Dowling-Degos disease-2 (DDD2; 615327) is caused by mutation in the POFUT1 gene (607491) on chromosome 20q11. Dowling-Degos disease-3 (DDD3; 615674) has been mapped to chromosome 17p33.3. Dowling-Degos disease-4 (DDD4; 615696) is caused by mutation in the POGLUT1 gene (615618) on chromosome 3q13. Dyschromatosis symmetrica hereditaria (DSH; 127400), also known as reticulate acropigmentation of Dohi (RAD), is caused by mutation in the ADAR gene (146920) on chromosome 1q21. Reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura (RAK; 615537) is caused by mutation in the ADAM10 gene (602192) on chromosome 15q21. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
811363
Concept ID:
C3714534
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with migratory circinate erythema

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some cases) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. The current classification of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) includes two major types and 17 minor subtypes of EBS; all share the common feature of blistering above the dermal-epidermal junction at the ultrastructural level. The four most common subtypes of EBS are the focus of this GeneReview: EBS, localized (EBS-loc; previously known as Weber-Cockayne type). EBS, generalized intermediate (EBS-gen intermed; previously known as Koebner type). EBS-with mottled pigmentation (EBS-MP). EBS, generalized severe (EBS-gen sev; previously known as Dowling-Meara type). The phenotypes for these subtypes range from relatively mild blistering of the hands and feet to more generalized blistering, which can be fatal. In EBS-loc, blisters are rarely present or minimal at birth and may occur on the knees and shins with crawling or on the feet at approximately age 18 months; some individuals manifest the disease in adolescence or early adulthood. Blisters are usually confined to the hands and feet, but can occur anywhere if trauma is significant. In EBS, gen intermed, blisters may be present at birth or develop within the first few months of life. Involvement is more widespread than in EBS-loc, but generally milder than in EBS-gen sev. In EBS-MP, skin fragility is evident at birth and clinically indistinguishable from EBS-gen sev; over time, progressive brown pigmentation interspersed with hypopigmented spots develops on the trunk and extremities, with the pigmentation disappearing in adult life. Focal palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses may occur. In EBS-gen sev, onset is usually at birth; severity varies greatly, both among and within families. Widespread and severe blistering and/or multiple grouped clumps of small blisters are typical and hemorrhagic blisters are common. Improvement occurs during mid- to late childhood. Progressive hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles begins in childhood and may be the major complaint of affected individuals in adult life. Nail dystrophy and milia are common. Both hyper- and hypopigmentation can occur. Mucosal involvement in EBS-gen sev may interfere with feeding, especially in neonates and infants. Blistering can be severe enough to result in neonatal or infant death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
324475
Concept ID:
C1836284
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with mottled pigmentation

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some cases) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. The current classification of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) includes two major types and 17 minor subtypes of EBS; all share the common feature of blistering above the dermal-epidermal junction at the ultrastructural level. The four most common subtypes of EBS are the focus of this GeneReview: EBS, localized (EBS-loc; previously known as Weber-Cockayne type). EBS, generalized intermediate (EBS-gen intermed; previously known as Koebner type). EBS-with mottled pigmentation (EBS-MP). EBS, generalized severe (EBS-gen sev; previously known as Dowling-Meara type). The phenotypes for these subtypes range from relatively mild blistering of the hands and feet to more generalized blistering, which can be fatal. In EBS-loc, blisters are rarely present or minimal at birth and may occur on the knees and shins with crawling or on the feet at approximately age 18 months; some individuals manifest the disease in adolescence or early adulthood. Blisters are usually confined to the hands and feet, but can occur anywhere if trauma is significant. In EBS, gen intermed, blisters may be present at birth or develop within the first few months of life. Involvement is more widespread than in EBS-loc, but generally milder than in EBS-gen sev. In EBS-MP, skin fragility is evident at birth and clinically indistinguishable from EBS-gen sev; over time, progressive brown pigmentation interspersed with hypopigmented spots develops on the trunk and extremities, with the pigmentation disappearing in adult life. Focal palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses may occur. In EBS-gen sev, onset is usually at birth; severity varies greatly, both among and within families. Widespread and severe blistering and/or multiple grouped clumps of small blisters are typical and hemorrhagic blisters are common. Improvement occurs during mid- to late childhood. Progressive hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles begins in childhood and may be the major complaint of affected individuals in adult life. Nail dystrophy and milia are common. Both hyper- and hypopigmentation can occur. Mucosal involvement in EBS-gen sev may interfere with feeding, especially in neonates and infants. Blistering can be severe enough to result in neonatal or infant death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140934
Concept ID:
C0432316
Congenital Abnormality
7.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Cockayne-Touraine type

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some cases) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. The current classification of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) includes two major types and 17 minor subtypes of EBS; all share the common feature of blistering above the dermal-epidermal junction at the ultrastructural level. The four most common subtypes of EBS are the focus of this GeneReview: EBS, localized (EBS-loc; previously known as Weber-Cockayne type). EBS, generalized intermediate (EBS-gen intermed; previously known as Koebner type). EBS-with mottled pigmentation (EBS-MP). EBS, generalized severe (EBS-gen sev; previously known as Dowling-Meara type). The phenotypes for these subtypes range from relatively mild blistering of the hands and feet to more generalized blistering, which can be fatal. In EBS-loc, blisters are rarely present or minimal at birth and may occur on the knees and shins with crawling or on the feet at approximately age 18 months; some individuals manifest the disease in adolescence or early adulthood. Blisters are usually confined to the hands and feet, but can occur anywhere if trauma is significant. In EBS, gen intermed, blisters may be present at birth or develop within the first few months of life. Involvement is more widespread than in EBS-loc, but generally milder than in EBS-gen sev. In EBS-MP, skin fragility is evident at birth and clinically indistinguishable from EBS-gen sev; over time, progressive brown pigmentation interspersed with hypopigmented spots develops on the trunk and extremities, with the pigmentation disappearing in adult life. Focal palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses may occur. In EBS-gen sev, onset is usually at birth; severity varies greatly, both among and within families. Widespread and severe blistering and/or multiple grouped clumps of small blisters are typical and hemorrhagic blisters are common. Improvement occurs during mid- to late childhood. Progressive hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles begins in childhood and may be the major complaint of affected individuals in adult life. Nail dystrophy and milia are common. Both hyper- and hypopigmentation can occur. Mucosal involvement in EBS-gen sev may interfere with feeding, especially in neonates and infants. Blistering can be severe enough to result in neonatal or infant death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87016
Concept ID:
C0080333
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Koebner type

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some cases) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. The current classification of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) includes two major types and 17 minor subtypes of EBS; all share the common feature of blistering above the dermal-epidermal junction at the ultrastructural level. The four most common subtypes of EBS are the focus of this GeneReview: EBS, localized (EBS-loc; previously known as Weber-Cockayne type). EBS, generalized intermediate (EBS-gen intermed; previously known as Koebner type). EBS-with mottled pigmentation (EBS-MP). EBS, generalized severe (EBS-gen sev; previously known as Dowling-Meara type). The phenotypes for these subtypes range from relatively mild blistering of the hands and feet to more generalized blistering, which can be fatal. In EBS-loc, blisters are rarely present or minimal at birth and may occur on the knees and shins with crawling or on the feet at approximately age 18 months; some individuals manifest the disease in adolescence or early adulthood. Blisters are usually confined to the hands and feet, but can occur anywhere if trauma is significant. In EBS, gen intermed, blisters may be present at birth or develop within the first few months of life. Involvement is more widespread than in EBS-loc, but generally milder than in EBS-gen sev. In EBS-MP, skin fragility is evident at birth and clinically indistinguishable from EBS-gen sev; over time, progressive brown pigmentation interspersed with hypopigmented spots develops on the trunk and extremities, with the pigmentation disappearing in adult life. Focal palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses may occur. In EBS-gen sev, onset is usually at birth; severity varies greatly, both among and within families. Widespread and severe blistering and/or multiple grouped clumps of small blisters are typical and hemorrhagic blisters are common. Improvement occurs during mid- to late childhood. Progressive hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles begins in childhood and may be the major complaint of affected individuals in adult life. Nail dystrophy and milia are common. Both hyper- and hypopigmentation can occur. Mucosal involvement in EBS-gen sev may interfere with feeding, especially in neonates and infants. Blistering can be severe enough to result in neonatal or infant death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
86897
Concept ID:
C0079299
Congenital Abnormality
9.

Epidermolysis bullosa herpetiformis, Dowling-Meara

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some cases) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. The current classification of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) includes two major types and 17 minor subtypes of EBS; all share the common feature of blistering above the dermal-epidermal junction at the ultrastructural level. The four most common subtypes of EBS are the focus of this GeneReview: EBS, localized (EBS-loc; previously known as Weber-Cockayne type). EBS, generalized intermediate (EBS-gen intermed; previously known as Koebner type). EBS-with mottled pigmentation (EBS-MP). EBS, generalized severe (EBS-gen sev; previously known as Dowling-Meara type). The phenotypes for these subtypes range from relatively mild blistering of the hands and feet to more generalized blistering, which can be fatal. In EBS-loc, blisters are rarely present or minimal at birth and may occur on the knees and shins with crawling or on the feet at approximately age 18 months; some individuals manifest the disease in adolescence or early adulthood. Blisters are usually confined to the hands and feet, but can occur anywhere if trauma is significant. In EBS, gen intermed, blisters may be present at birth or develop within the first few months of life. Involvement is more widespread than in EBS-loc, but generally milder than in EBS-gen sev. In EBS-MP, skin fragility is evident at birth and clinically indistinguishable from EBS-gen sev; over time, progressive brown pigmentation interspersed with hypopigmented spots develops on the trunk and extremities, with the pigmentation disappearing in adult life. Focal palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses may occur. In EBS-gen sev, onset is usually at birth; severity varies greatly, both among and within families. Widespread and severe blistering and/or multiple grouped clumps of small blisters are typical and hemorrhagic blisters are common. Improvement occurs during mid- to late childhood. Progressive hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles begins in childhood and may be the major complaint of affected individuals in adult life. Nail dystrophy and milia are common. Both hyper- and hypopigmentation can occur. Mucosal involvement in EBS-gen sev may interfere with feeding, especially in neonates and infants. Blistering can be severe enough to result in neonatal or infant death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
38194
Concept ID:
C0079295
Disease or Syndrome
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