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Items: 4

1.

Niemann-pick disease, intermediate, protracted neurovisceral

Niemann-Pick disease is a condition that affects many body systems. It has a wide range of symptoms that vary in severity. Niemann-Pick disease is divided into four main types: type A, type B, type C1, and type C2. These types are classified on the basis of genetic cause and the signs and symptoms of the condition.Infants with Niemann-Pick disease type A usually develop an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly) by age 3 months and fail to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive). The affected children develop normally until around age 1 year when they experience a progressive loss of mental abilities and movement (psychomotor regression). Children with Niemann-Pick disease type A also develop widespread lung damage (interstitial lung disease) that can cause recurrent lung infections and eventually lead to respiratory failure. All affected children have an eye abnormality called a cherry-red spot, which can be identified with an eye examination. Children with Niemann-Pick disease type A generally do not survive past early childhood.Niemann-Pick disease type B usually presents in mid-childhood. The signs and symptoms of this type are similar to type A, but not as severe. People with Niemann-Pick disease type B often have hepatosplenomegaly, recurrent lung infections, and a low number of platelets in the blood (thrombocytopenia). They also have short stature and slowed mineralization of bone (delayed bone age). About one-third of affected individuals have the cherry-red spot eye abnormality or neurological impairment. People with Niemann-Pick disease type B usually survive into adulthood.The signs and symptoms of Niemann-Pick disease types C1 and C2 are very similar; these types differ only in their genetic cause. Niemann-Pick disease types C1 and C2 usually become apparent in childhood, although signs and symptoms can develop at any time. People with these types usually develop difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), an inability to move the eyes vertically (vertical supranuclear gaze palsy), poor muscle tone (dystonia), severe liver disease, and interstitial lung disease. Individuals with Niemann-Pick disease types C1 and C2 have problems with speech and swallowing that worsen over time, eventually interfering with feeding. Affected individuals often experience progressive decline in intellectual function and about one-third have seizures. People with these types may survive into adulthood.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
390848
Concept ID:
C2675646
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Niemann-Pick disease, type B

Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency has been categorized in the past as either neuronopathic (Niemann-Pick disease type A [NPD-A]), with death in early childhood, or non-neuronopathic (Niemann-Pick disease type B [NPD-B]). While forms intermediate to these two extremes occur, all ASM deficiency that is not NPD-A is designated in this review as NPD-B, despite its wide range of manifestations and severity. The first symptom in NPD-A is hepatosplenomegaly, usually noted by age three months; over time the liver and spleen become massive. Psychomotor development progresses no further than the 12-month level, after which neurologic deterioration is relentless. A classic cherry-red spot of the macula of the retina, which may not be present in the first few months, is eventually present in all affected children. Interstitial lung disease caused by storage of sphingomyelin in pulmonary macrophages results in frequent respiratory infections and often respiratory failure. Most children succumb before the third year. NPD type B, later in onset and milder in manifestations than NPD type A, is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly with progressive hypersplenism and stable liver dysfunction, gradual deterioration in pulmonary function, osteopenia, and atherogenic lipid profile. Progressive and/or clinically significant neurologic manifestations occur infrequently. Survival to adulthood can occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78651
Concept ID:
C0268243
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Niemann-Pick disease, type A

Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency has been categorized in the past as either neuronopathic (Niemann-Pick disease type A [NPD-A]), with death in early childhood, or non-neuronopathic (Niemann-Pick disease type B [NPD-B]). While forms intermediate to these two extremes occur, all ASM deficiency that is not NPD-A is designated in this review as NPD-B, despite its wide range of manifestations and severity. The first symptom in NPD-A is hepatosplenomegaly, usually noted by age three months; over time the liver and spleen become massive. Psychomotor development progresses no further than the 12-month level, after which neurologic deterioration is relentless. A classic cherry-red spot of the macula of the retina, which may not be present in the first few months, is eventually present in all affected children. Interstitial lung disease caused by storage of sphingomyelin in pulmonary macrophages results in frequent respiratory infections and often respiratory failure. Most children succumb before the third year. NPD type B, later in onset and milder in manifestations than NPD type A, is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly with progressive hypersplenism and stable liver dysfunction, gradual deterioration in pulmonary function, osteopenia, and atherogenic lipid profile. Progressive and/or clinically significant neurologic manifestations occur infrequently. Survival to adulthood can occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78650
Concept ID:
C0268242
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency

Methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism resulting in isolated hypermethioninemia. Most patients have no clinical abnormalities, although some with the autosomal recessive form have have neurologic abnormalities (Mudd et al., 2003; Kim et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75700
Concept ID:
C0268621
Disease or Syndrome
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