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Cerebral cavernous malformations 2(CCM2)

MedGen UID:
400438
Concept ID:
C1864041
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: CCM2; Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 2
Modes of inheritance:
Heterogeneous
MedGen UID:
67020
Concept ID:
C0242960
Organism Attribute
Source: HPO
The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
Autosomal dominant inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
 
Gene (location): CCM2 (7p13)
OMIM®: 603284

Definition

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations in the brain and spinal cord comprising closely clustered, enlarged capillary channels (caverns) with a single layer of endothelium without mature vessel wall elements or normal intervening brain parenchyma. The diameter of CCMs ranges from a few millimeters to several centimeters. CCMs increase or decrease in size and increase in number over time. Hundreds of lesions may be identified, depending on the person’s age and the quality and type of brain imaging used. Although CCMs have been reported in infants and children, the majority become evident between the second and fifth decades with findings such as seizures, focal neurologic deficits, nonspecific headaches, and cerebral hemorrhage. Up to 50% of individuals with FCCM remain symptom free throughout their lives. Cutaneous vascular lesions are found in 9% of those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCM; see Diagnosis/testing) and retinal vascular lesions in almost 5%. [from GTR]

Additional descriptions

From GeneReviews
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations in the brain and spinal cord comprising closely clustered, enlarged capillary channels (caverns) with a single layer of endothelium without mature vessel wall elements or normal intervening brain parenchyma. The diameter of CCMs ranges from a few millimeters to several centimeters. CCMs increase or decrease in size and increase in number over time. Hundreds of lesions may be identified, depending on the person’s age and the quality and type of brain imaging used. Although CCMs have been reported in infants and children, the majority become evident between the second and fifth decades with findings such as seizures, focal neurologic deficits, nonspecific headaches, and cerebral hemorrhage. Up to 50% of individuals with FCCM remain symptom free throughout their lives. Cutaneous vascular lesions are found in 9% of those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCM; see Diagnosis/testing) and retinal vascular lesions in almost 5%.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1293
From GHR
Cerebral cavernous malformations are collections of small blood vessels (capillaries) in the brain that are enlarged and irregular in structure. These capillaries have abnormally thin walls, and they lack other support tissues, such as elastic fibers, which normally make them stretchy. As a result, the blood vessels are prone to leakage, which can cause the health problems related to this condition. Cavernous malformations can occur anywhere in the body, but usually produce serious signs and symptoms only when they occur in the brain and spinal cord (which are described as cerebral).Approximately 25 percent of individuals with cerebral cavernous malformations never experience any related health problems. Other people with this condition may experience serious signs and symptoms such as headaches, seizures, paralysis, hearing or vision loss, and bleeding in the brain (cerebral hemorrhage). Severe brain hemorrhages can result in death. The location and number of cerebral cavernous malformations determine the severity of this disorder. These malformations can change in size and number over time.There are two forms of the condition: familial and sporadic. The familial form is passed from parent to child, and affected individuals typically have multiple cerebral cavernous malformations. The sporadic form occurs in people with no family history of the disorder. These individuals typically have only one malformation.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/cerebral-cavernous-malformation

Clinical features

Stroke
MedGen UID:
52522
Concept ID:
C0038454
Disease or Syndrome
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Spider veins
MedGen UID:
215068
Concept ID:
C1138421
Finding
Telangiectasias refer to small dilated blood vessels located near the surface of the skin or mucous membranes, measuring between 0.5 and 1 millimeter in diameter. Telangiectasia are located especially on the tongue, lips, palate, fingers, face, conjunctiva, trunk, nail beds, and fingertips.
Seizure Disorders
MedGen UID:
4506
Concept ID:
C0014544
Disease or Syndrome
A brain disorder characterized by episodes of abnormally increased neuronal discharge resulting in transient episodes of sensory or motor neurological dysfunction, or psychic dysfunction. These episodes may or may not be associated with loss of consciousness or convulsions.
Headache
MedGen UID:
9149
Concept ID:
C0018681
Sign or Symptom
Cephalgia, or pain sensed in various parts of the head, not confined to the area of distribution of any nerve.
Stroke
MedGen UID:
52522
Concept ID:
C0038454
Disease or Syndrome
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Spider veins
MedGen UID:
215068
Concept ID:
C1138421
Finding
Telangiectasias refer to small dilated blood vessels located near the surface of the skin or mucous membranes, measuring between 0.5 and 1 millimeter in diameter. Telangiectasia are located especially on the tongue, lips, palate, fingers, face, conjunctiva, trunk, nail beds, and fingertips.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Meschia JF, Bushnell C, Boden-Albala B, Braun LT, Bravata DM, Chaturvedi S, Creager MA, Eckel RH, Elkind MS, Fornage M, Goldstein LB, Greenberg SM, Horvath SE, Iadecola C, Jauch EC, Moore WS, Wilson JA; American Heart Association Stroke Council.; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing.; Council on Clinical Cardiology.; Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology.; Council on Hypertension.
Stroke 2014 Dec;45(12):3754-832. Epub 2014 Oct 28 doi: 10.1161/STR.0000000000000046. PMID: 25355838Free PMC Article
Burgunder JM, Finsterer J, Szolnoki Z, Fontaine B, Baets J, Van Broeckhoven C, Di Donato S, De Jonghe P, Lynch T, Mariotti C, Schöls L, Spinazzola A, Tabrizi SJ, Tallaksen C, Zeviani M, Harbo HF, Gasser T; EFNS.
Eur J Neurol 2010 May;17(5):641-8. Epub 2010 Mar 9 doi: 10.1111/j.1468-1331.2010.02985.x. PMID: 20298421

External

Guidelines for the management of cerebral cavernous malformations in adults

Recent clinical studies

Clinical prediction guides

Fisher OS, Zhang R, Li X, Murphy JW, Demeler B, Boggon TJ
FEBS Lett 2013 Jan 31;587(3):272-7. Epub 2012 Dec 22 doi: 10.1016/j.febslet.2012.12.011. PMID: 23266514Free PMC Article

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