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Items: 8

1.

Atypical Rett syndrome

A neurodevelopmental disorder that is diagnosed when a child presents with a Rett-like syndrome but does not fulfil all the diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome. Several subvariants have been defined; the early-onset seizure type (Hanefeld), congenital variant (Rolando), the 'forme fruste' type, the late childhood regression form and the preserved speech variant (PSD or Zappella variant). Diagnosis relies on clinical evaluation using the diagnostic criteria for atypical Rett originally defined by Hagberg in 1994: an atypical case must meet at least three of the six main criteria and at least five of the eleven supportive criteria. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
440664
Concept ID:
C2748910
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy with microcephaly

MECP2-related disorders in females include classic Rett syndrome, variant Rett syndrome, and mild learning disabilities. A pathogenic MECP2 variant in a male is presumed to most often be lethal; phenotypes in rare surviving males are primarily severe neonatal encephalopathy and manic-depressive psychosis, pyramidal signs, Parkinsonian, and macro-orchidism (PPM-X syndrome). Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Atypical Rett syndrome is observed increasingly as MECP2 variants are identified in individuals previously diagnosed with: clinically suspected but molecularly unconfirmed Angelman syndrome; intellectual disability with spasticity or tremor; mild learning disability; or (rarely) autism. Severe neonatal encephalopathy resulting in death before age two years is the most common phenotype observed in affected males. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
409616
Concept ID:
C1968556
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Rett syndrome, zappella variant

MedGen UID:
393807
Concept ID:
C2677682
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Rett Syndrome, Preserved Speech Variant

MedGen UID:
374197
Concept ID:
C1839332
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Mental retardation, X-linked, syndromic 13

The MECP2 gene is mutated in Rett syndrome (RTT; 312750), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that almost always occurs in females. Males with non-RTT mutations in the MECP2 gene can demonstrate a wide variety of phenotypes, including X-linked mental retardation with spasticity and other variable features, described here, and Lubs X-linked mental retardation syndrome (MRXSL; 300260). Males with RTT-associated MECP2 mutations have neonatal severe encephalopathy that is usually lethal (300673) (Moog et al., 2003; Villard, 2007). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
368466
Concept ID:
C1968550
Disease or Syndrome
6.

MECP2 duplication syndrome

The MECP2 duplication syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, delayed psychomotor development leading to severe intellectual disability, poor speech development, progressive spasticity, recurrent respiratory infections (in ~75% of affected individuals) and seizures (in ~50%). MECP2 duplication syndrome is 100% penetrant in males. Occasionally females have been described with a MECP2 duplication and related clinical findings, often associated with concomitant X-chromosomal abnormalities that prevent inactivation of the duplicated region. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures are most often observed; atonic seizures and absence seizures have also been described. One third of affected males are never able to walk independently. Almost 50% of affected males die before age 25 years, presumably from complications of recurrent infection and/or neurologic deterioration. In addition to the core features, autistic behaviors and gastrointestinal dysfunction have been observed in several affected boys. Although interfamilial phenotypic variability is observed, severity is usually consistent within families. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
337496
Concept ID:
C1846058
Disease or Syndrome; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Autism, susceptibility to, X-linked 3

Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autism, see 209850. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335161
Concept ID:
C1845336
Finding
8.

Rett syndrome

MECP2-related disorders in females include classic Rett syndrome, variant Rett syndrome, and mild learning disabilities. A pathogenic MECP2 variant in a male is presumed to most often be lethal; phenotypes in rare surviving males are primarily severe neonatal encephalopathy and manic-depressive psychosis, pyramidal signs, Parkinsonian, and macro-orchidism (PPM-X syndrome). Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Atypical Rett syndrome is observed increasingly as MECP2 variants are identified in individuals previously diagnosed with: clinically suspected but molecularly unconfirmed Angelman syndrome; intellectual disability with spasticity or tremor; mild learning disability; or (rarely) autism. Severe neonatal encephalopathy resulting in death before age two years is the most common phenotype observed in affected males. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
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