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Items: 11

1.

HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM 2 WITHOUT ANOSMIA

MedGen UID:
864543
Concept ID:
C4016106
Finding
2.

HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM 2 WITHOUT ANOSMIA, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO

MedGen UID:
864542
Concept ID:
C4016105
Finding
3.

Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 2 with anosmia

MedGen UID:
864541
Concept ID:
C4016104
Finding
4.

HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM 2 WITH OR WITHOUT ANOSMIA, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO

MedGen UID:
864540
Concept ID:
C4016103
Finding
5.

HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM 2 WITH ANOSMIA, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO

MedGen UID:
864539
Concept ID:
C4016102
Finding
6.

Hartsfield syndrome

Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a structural anomaly of the brain in which there is failed or incomplete separation of the forebrain early in gestation. Classic HPE encompasses a continuum of brain malformations including (in order of decreasing severity): alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV) type HPE; a septopreoptic type has also been described. Other CNS abnormalities not specific to HPE may also occur. HPE is accompanied by a spectrum of characteristic craniofacial anomalies in approximately 80% of individuals with HPE. Developmental delay is present in virtually all individuals with the HPE spectrum of CNS anomalies. Seizures and pituitary dysfunction are common. Most affected fetuses do not survive; severely affected children typically do not survive beyond early infancy, while a significant proportion of more mildly affected children survive past 12 months. Mildly manifesting individuals without appreciable brain anomalies on conventional neuroimaging may be described as having “microform” HPE. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
335111
Concept ID:
C1845146
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Jackson-Weiss syndrome

The eight disorders comprising the FGFR-related craniosynostosis spectrum are Pfeiffer syndrome, Apert syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, Beare-Stevenson syndrome, FGFR2-related isolated coronal synostosis, Jackson-Weiss syndrome, Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans (AN), and Muenke syndrome (isolated coronal synostosis caused by the p.Pro250Arg pathogenic variant in FGFR3). Muenke syndrome and FGFR2-related isolated coronal synostosis are characterized only by uni- or bicoronal craniosynostosis; the remainder are characterized by bicoronal craniosynostosis or cloverleaf skull, distinctive facial features, and variable hand and foot findings. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
208653
Concept ID:
C0795998
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis

Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by ocular anomalies, skin lesions, and central nervous system (CNS) anomalies (Moog et al., 2007). The malformations in ECCL are patchy and asymmetric. The most characteristic skin anomaly is nevus psiloliparus, a well-demarcated, alopecic fatty tissue nevus on the scalp, seen in 80% of affected individuals. Other dermatologic features include frontotemporal or zygomatic subcutaneous fatty lipomas, non-scarring alopecia, focal dermal hypoplasia or aplasia of the scalp, periocular skin tags, and pigmentary abnormalities following the lines of Blaschko. Choristomas of the eye (epibulbar dermoids or lipodermoids) are also present in 80% of patients, and can be unilateral or bilateral. Characteristic CNS features in ECCL include intracranial and intraspinal lipomas, seen in 61% of patients, and less often cerebral asymmetry, arachnoid cysts, enlarged ventricles, and leptomeningeal angiomatosis. A predisposition to low-grade gliomas has also been observed. Seizures and intellectual disability are common, but one-third of affected individuals have normal intellect. Skeletal manifestations include bone cysts and jaw tumors, such as odontomas, osteomas, and ossifying fibromas (summary by Bennett et al., 2016). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
140807
Concept ID:
C0406612
Congenital Abnormality
9.

Trigonocephaly 1

Individuals with trigonocephaly have a keel-shaped forehead with wide biparietal diameter, resulting in a triangular shape of the head. Trigonocephaly results from premature closure of the metopic sutures and usually occurs sporadically (summary by Frydman et al., 1984). Genetic Heterogeneity of Isolated Trigonocephaly Also see trigonocephaly-2 (TRIGNO2; 614485), caused by mutation in the FREM1 gene (608944) on chromosome 9p22. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
98473
Concept ID:
C0432122
Congenital Abnormality
10.

Osteoglophonic dysplasia

Osteoglophonic dysplasia is a condition characterized by abnormal bone growth that leads to severe head and face (craniofacial) abnormalities, dwarfism, and other features. The term osteoglophonic refers to the bones (osteo-) having distinctive hollowed out (-glophonic) areas that appear as holes on x-ray images.Premature fusion of certain bones in the skull (craniosynostosis) typically occurs in osteoglophonic dysplasia. The craniosynostosis associated with this disorder may give the head a tall appearance, often referred to in the medical literature as a tower-shaped skull, or a relatively mild version of a deformity called a cloverleaf skull. Characteristic facial features in people with osteoglophonic dysplasia include a prominent forehead (frontal bossing), widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism), flattening of the bridge of the nose and of the middle of the face (midface hypoplasia), a large tongue (macroglossia), a protruding jaw (prognathism), and a short neck. People with this condition usually have no visible teeth because the teeth never emerge from the jaw (clinical anodontia). In addition, the gums are often overgrown (hypertrophic gingiva).Infants with osteoglophonic dysplasia often experience failure to thrive, which means they do not gain weight and grow at the expected rate. Affected individuals have short, bowed legs and arms and are short in stature. They also have flat feet and short, broad hands and fingers.The life expectancy of people with osteoglophonic dysplasia depends on the extent of their craniofacial abnormalities; those that obstruct the air passages and affect the mouth and teeth can lead to respiratory problems and cause difficulty with eating and drinking. Despite the skull abnormalities, intelligence is generally not affected in this disorder. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
96592
Concept ID:
C0432283
Congenital Abnormality
11.

Craniofacial-skeletal-dermatologic dysplasia

An autosomal dominant inherited type of acrocephalosyndactyly caused by mutations in the FGFR1 or FGFR2 genes. It is characterized by early closure of the sutures between the skull bones, bulging and wide-set eyes, broad thumbs, big toes, and partial syndactyly in the hands and toes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
67390
Concept ID:
C0220658
Disease or Syndrome
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