Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Neurofibromatosis, type 1(NF1)

MedGen UID:
18013
Concept ID:
C0027831
Neoplastic Process
Synonyms: NEUROFIBROMATOSIS, PERIPHERAL TYPE; NEUROFIBROMATOSIS, TYPE I; NEUROFIBROMATOSIS, TYPE I, SOMATIC; Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome; NF1; Recklinghausen's disease; Von Recklinghausen disease
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: OMIM, Orphanet
Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous).
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
892334
Concept ID:
CN000007
Functional Concept
Source: HPO
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
SNOMED CT: [M]Von Recklinghausen's disease (81669005); Neurofibromatosis type 1 (92824003); Neurofibromatosis, type 1 (92824003); Clinical von Reclinghausen's disease (92824003); Neurofibromatosis 1 (700061007); NF1 (700061007); Neurofibromatosis (nonmalignant) type (700061007); Neurofibromatosis, peripheral type (700061007); Von Recklinghausen disease (700061007); Neurofibromatosis 1 (92824003); Neurofibromatosis, peripheral type (92824003); NF1 (92824003); Von Recklinghausen disease (92824003)
 
Gene (location): NF1 (17q11.2)
OMIM®: 162200
Orphanet: ORPHA636

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Neurofibromatosis 1
Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is characterized by multiple café-au-lait spots, axillary and inguinal freckling, multiple cutaneous neurofibromas, and iris Lisch nodules. Learning disabilities are present in at least 50% of individuals with NF1. Less common but potentially more serious manifestations include plexiform neurofibromas, optic nerve and other central nervous system gliomas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, scoliosis, tibial dysplasia, and vasculopathy.  [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
JM Friedman   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Neurofibromatosis type I is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cafe-au-lait spots, Lisch nodules in the eye, and fibromatous tumors of the skin. Individuals with the disorder have increased susceptibility to the development of benign and malignant tumors. NF1 is sometimes referred to as 'peripheral neurofibromatosis.' The worldwide incidence of NF1 is 1 in 2,500 to 1 in 3,000 individuals (reviews by Shen et al., 1996 and Williams et al., 2009). Type II neurofibromatosis (NF2; 101000) is a genetically distinct disorder caused by mutation in the gene encoding merlin (NF2; 607379) on chromosome 22q12. NF2, sometimes known as 'central neurofibromatosis,' is characterized by bilateral acoustic neuroma and meningioma, but few skin lesions or neurofibromas (Rouleau et al., 1993). Some patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in mismatch repair genes (see, e.g., MLH1; 120436 and MSH2; 609309) have a phenotype characterized by early onset malignancies and mild features of NF1, especially cafe-au-lait spots; this is known as the mismatch repair cancer syndrome (276300), sometimes referred to as brain tumor-polyposis syndrome-1 or Turcot syndrome. These patients typically do not have germline mutations in the NF1 gene, although a study by Wang et al. (2003) suggested that biallelic mutations in mismatch repair genes may cause somatic mutations in the NF1 gene, perhaps resulting in isolated features resembling NF1. See also Legius syndrome (611431), a genetically distinct disorder with a similar phenotype to NF1.  http://www.omim.org/entry/162200
From GHR
Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a condition characterized by changes in skin coloring (pigmentation) and the growth of tumors along nerves in the skin, brain, and other parts of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary widely among affected people.Beginning in early childhood, almost all people with neurofibromatosis type 1 have multiple café-au-lait spots, which are flat patches on the skin that are darker than the surrounding area. These spots increase in size and number as the individual grows older. Freckles in the underarms and groin typically develop later in childhood.Most adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop neurofibromas, which are noncancerous (benign) tumors that are usually located on or just under the skin. These tumors may also occur in nerves near the spinal cord or along nerves elsewhere in the body. Some people with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop cancerous tumors that grow along nerves. These tumors, which usually develop in adolescence or adulthood, are called malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. People with neurofibromatosis type 1 also have an increased risk of developing other cancers, including brain tumors and cancer of blood-forming tissue (leukemia).During childhood, benign growths called Lisch nodules often appear in the colored part of the eye (the iris). Lisch nodules do not interfere with vision. Some affected individuals also develop tumors that grow along the nerve leading from the eye to the brain (the optic nerve). These tumors, which are called optic gliomas, may lead to reduced vision or total vision loss. In some cases, optic gliomas have no effect on vision.Additional signs and symptoms of neurofibromatosis type 1 include high blood pressure (hypertension), short stature, an unusually large head (macrocephaly), and skeletal abnormalities such as an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis). Although most people with neurofibromatosis type 1 have normal intelligence, learning disabilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) occur frequently in affected individuals.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/neurofibromatosis-type-1

Clinical features

Hypertension
MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder
Pheochromocytoma
MedGen UID:
505323
Concept ID:
CN002423
Finding
Pheochromocytomas (also known as chromaffin tumors) produce, store, and secrete catecholamines. Pheochromocytomas usually originate from the adrenal medulla but may also develop from chromaffin cells in or about sympathetic ganglia. A common symptom of pheochromocytoma is hypertension owing to release of catecholamines.
Glaucoma
MedGen UID:
42224
Concept ID:
C0017601
Disease or Syndrome
Glaucoma is a group of eye disorders in which the optic nerves connecting the eyes and the brain are progressively damaged. This damage can lead to reduction in side (peripheral) vision and eventual blindness. Other signs and symptoms may include bulging eyes, excessive tearing, and abnormal sensitivity to light (photophobia). The term "early-onset glaucoma" may be used when the disorder appears before the age of 40.In most people with glaucoma, the damage to the optic nerves is caused by increased pressure within the eyes (intraocular pressure). Intraocular pressure depends on a balance between fluid entering and leaving the eyes.Usually glaucoma develops in older adults, in whom the risk of developing the disorder may be affected by a variety of medical conditions including high blood pressure (hypertension) and diabetes mellitus, as well as family history. The risk of early-onset glaucoma depends mainly on heredity.Structural abnormalities that impede fluid drainage in the eye may be present at birth and usually become apparent during the first year of life. Such abnormalities may be part of a genetic disorder that affects many body systems, called a syndrome. If glaucoma appears before the age of 5 without other associated abnormalities, it is called primary congenital glaucoma.Other individuals experience early onset of primary open-angle glaucoma, the most common adult form of glaucoma. If primary open-angle glaucoma develops during childhood or early adulthood, it is called juvenile open-angle glaucoma.
Lisch nodules
MedGen UID:
395461
Concept ID:
C1860334
Finding
The presence of pigmented, oval and dome-shaped raised hamartomatous nevi of the iris..
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
504419
Concept ID:
CN000296
Finding
Interpupillary distance more than 2 SD above the mean (alternatively, the appearance of an increased interpupillary distance or widely spaced eyes).
Astrocytoma
MedGen UID:
438
Concept ID:
C0004114
Neoplastic Process
Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)
Rhabdomyosarcoma
MedGen UID:
20561
Concept ID:
C0035412
Neoplastic Process
A malignant mesenchymal neoplasm arising from skeletal muscle.
Plexiform neurofibroma
MedGen UID:
64640
Concept ID:
C0206728
Neoplastic Process
A neurofibroma in which Schwann cells proliferate inside the nerve sheath, producing an irregularly thickened, distorted, tortuous structure.
Optic glioma
MedGen UID:
138056
Concept ID:
C0346326
Neoplastic Process
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood.
Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor
MedGen UID:
155614
Concept ID:
C0751690
Neoplastic Process
A malignant neoplasm, originating from the sheaths of the peripheral nerve.
Lisch nodules
MedGen UID:
395461
Concept ID:
C1860334
Finding
The presence of pigmented, oval and dome-shaped raised hamartomatous nevi of the iris..
Spinal neurofibromas
MedGen UID:
869787
Concept ID:
C4024217
Neoplastic Process
Neurofibromas originating in the spine.
Pheochromocytoma
MedGen UID:
505323
Concept ID:
CN002423
Finding
Pheochromocytomas (also known as chromaffin tumors) produce, store, and secrete catecholamines. Pheochromocytomas usually originate from the adrenal medulla but may also develop from chromaffin cells in or about sympathetic ganglia. A common symptom of pheochromocytoma is hypertension owing to release of catecholamines.
Meningioma
MedGen UID:
505374
Concept ID:
CN002583
Finding
The presence of a meningioma, i.e., a benign tumor originating from the dura mater or arachnoid mater.
Renal artery stenosis
MedGen UID:
505007
Concept ID:
CN001737
Finding
The presence of stenosis of the renal artery.
Genu valgum
MedGen UID:
154364
Concept ID:
C0576093
Anatomical Abnormality
The legs angle inward, such that the knees are close together and the ankles far apart.
Tibial pseudoarthrosis
MedGen UID:
869786
Concept ID:
C4024216
Anatomical Abnormality
Pseudarthrosis, or \
Hypertension
MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder
Renal artery stenosis
MedGen UID:
505007
Concept ID:
CN001737
Finding
The presence of stenosis of the renal artery.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
Height greater than two standard deviations below the mean of the appropriate reference population for the age and sex of the individual.
Astrocytoma
MedGen UID:
438
Concept ID:
C0004114
Neoplastic Process
Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)
Hydrocephalus
MedGen UID:
9335
Concept ID:
C0020255
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hydrocephalus is characterized by onset in utero of enlarged ventricles due to a disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation. Affected individuals may have neurologic impairment (summary by Drielsma et al., 2012). Hydrocephalus can also be caused by Arnold-Chiari malformation, atresia of foramen of Magendie, stenosis of aqueduct of Sylvius (307000), toxoplasmosis, hydranencephaly, etc. Furthermore, it develops in infancy or childhood in achondroplasia (100800) and in Hurler disease (607014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Hydrocephalus See also autosomal recessive HYC2 (615219), caused by mutation in the MPDZ gene (603785) on chromosome 9p. An X-linked form (307000) is caused by mutation in the L1CAM gene on (308840) on chromosome Xq28.
Seizures
MedGen UID:
20693
Concept ID:
C0036572
Sign or Symptom
Seizures are symptoms of a brain problem. They happen because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures cause convulsions. There are many types of seizures and some have mild symptoms. Seizures fall into two main groups. Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, happen in just one part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity on both sides of the brain. . Most seizures last from 30 seconds to 2 minutes and do not cause lasting harm. However, it is a medical emergency if seizures last longer than 5 minutes or if a person has many seizures and does not wake up between them. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
Spina bifida
MedGen UID:
38283
Concept ID:
C0080178
Congenital Abnormality
Spina bifida is a condition in which the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. As a result, when the spine forms, the bones of the spinal column do not close completely around the developing nerves of the spinal cord. Part of the spinal cord may stick out through an opening in the spine, leading to permanent nerve damage. Because spina bifida is caused by abnormalities of the neural tube, it is classified as a neural tube defect.Children born with spina bifida often have a fluid-filled sac on their back that is covered by skin, called a meningocele. If the sac contains part of the spinal cord and its protective covering, it is known as a myelomeningocele. The signs and symptoms of these abnormalities range from mild to severe, depending on where the opening in the spinal column is located and how much of the spinal cord is affected. Related problems can include a loss of feeling below the level of the opening, weakness or paralysis of the feet or legs, and problems with bladder and bowel control. Some affected individuals have additional complications, including a buildup of excess fluid around the brain (hydrocephalus) and learning problems. With surgery and other forms of treatment, many people with spina bifida live into adulthood.In a milder form of the condition, called spina bifida occulta, the bones of the spinal column are abnormally formed, but the nerves of the spinal cord usually develop normally. Unlike in the more severe form of spina bifida, the nerves do not stick out through an opening in the spine. Spina bifida occulta most often causes no health problems, although rarely it can cause back pain or changes in bladder function.
Plexiform neurofibroma
MedGen UID:
64640
Concept ID:
C0206728
Neoplastic Process
A neurofibroma in which Schwann cells proliferate inside the nerve sheath, producing an irregularly thickened, distorted, tortuous structure.
Optic glioma
MedGen UID:
138056
Concept ID:
C0346326
Neoplastic Process
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood.
Hypsarrhythmia
MedGen UID:
195766
Concept ID:
C0684276
Finding
Hypsarrhythmia is abnormal interictal high amplitude waves and a background of irregular spikes. There is continuous (during wakefulness), high-amplitude (>200 Hz), generalized polymorphic slowing with no organized background and multifocal spikes demonstrated by electroencephalography (EEG).
Aqueductal stenosis
MedGen UID:
424818
Concept ID:
C2936786
Disease or Syndrome
Stenosis of the cerebral aqueduct (also known as the mesencephalic duct, aqueductus mesencephali, or aqueduct of Sylvius), which connects the third cerebral ventricle in the diencephalon to the fourth ventricle, which is between the pons and cerebellum.
Spinal neurofibromas
MedGen UID:
869787
Concept ID:
C4024217
Neoplastic Process
Neurofibromas originating in the spine.
Specific learning disability
MedGen UID:
504802
Concept ID:
CN001216
Finding
Impairment of certain skills such as reading or writing, coordination, self-control, or attention that interfere with the ability to learn. The impairment is not related to a global deficiency of intelligence.
Pheochromocytoma
MedGen UID:
505323
Concept ID:
CN002423
Finding
Pheochromocytomas (also known as chromaffin tumors) produce, store, and secrete catecholamines. Pheochromocytomas usually originate from the adrenal medulla but may also develop from chromaffin cells in or about sympathetic ganglia. A common symptom of pheochromocytoma is hypertension owing to release of catecholamines.
Meningioma
MedGen UID:
505374
Concept ID:
CN002583
Finding
The presence of a meningioma, i.e., a benign tumor originating from the dura mater or arachnoid mater.
Rhabdomyosarcoma
MedGen UID:
20561
Concept ID:
C0035412
Neoplastic Process
A malignant mesenchymal neoplasm arising from skeletal muscle.
Spina bifida
MedGen UID:
38283
Concept ID:
C0080178
Congenital Abnormality
Spina bifida is a condition in which the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. As a result, when the spine forms, the bones of the spinal column do not close completely around the developing nerves of the spinal cord. Part of the spinal cord may stick out through an opening in the spine, leading to permanent nerve damage. Because spina bifida is caused by abnormalities of the neural tube, it is classified as a neural tube defect.Children born with spina bifida often have a fluid-filled sac on their back that is covered by skin, called a meningocele. If the sac contains part of the spinal cord and its protective covering, it is known as a myelomeningocele. The signs and symptoms of these abnormalities range from mild to severe, depending on where the opening in the spinal column is located and how much of the spinal cord is affected. Related problems can include a loss of feeling below the level of the opening, weakness or paralysis of the feet or legs, and problems with bladder and bowel control. Some affected individuals have additional complications, including a buildup of excess fluid around the brain (hydrocephalus) and learning problems. With surgery and other forms of treatment, many people with spina bifida live into adulthood.In a milder form of the condition, called spina bifida occulta, the bones of the spinal column are abnormally formed, but the nerves of the spinal cord usually develop normally. Unlike in the more severe form of spina bifida, the nerves do not stick out through an opening in the spine. Spina bifida occulta most often causes no health problems, although rarely it can cause back pain or changes in bladder function.
Genu valgum
MedGen UID:
154364
Concept ID:
C0576093
Anatomical Abnormality
The legs angle inward, such that the knees are close together and the ankles far apart.
Scoliosis
MedGen UID:
195976
Concept ID:
C0700208
Finding
The presence of an abnormal lateral curvature of the spine.
Overgrowth
MedGen UID:
376550
Concept ID:
C1849265
Finding
Excessive postnatal growth which may comprise increased weight, increased length, and/or increased head circumference.
Tibial pseudoarthrosis
MedGen UID:
869786
Concept ID:
C4024216
Anatomical Abnormality
Pseudarthrosis, or \
Overgrowth
MedGen UID:
376550
Concept ID:
C1849265
Finding
Excessive postnatal growth which may comprise increased weight, increased length, and/or increased head circumference.
Lisch nodules
MedGen UID:
395461
Concept ID:
C1860334
Finding
The presence of pigmented, oval and dome-shaped raised hamartomatous nevi of the iris..
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
504419
Concept ID:
CN000296
Finding
Interpupillary distance more than 2 SD above the mean (alternatively, the appearance of an increased interpupillary distance or widely spaced eyes).
Plexiform neurofibroma
MedGen UID:
64640
Concept ID:
C0206728
Neoplastic Process
A neurofibroma in which Schwann cells proliferate inside the nerve sheath, producing an irregularly thickened, distorted, tortuous structure.
Cafe-au-lait spot
MedGen UID:
113157
Concept ID:
C0221263
Finding
Light brown pigmented macules associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS and Albright's syndrome (see FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, POLYOSTOTIC).
Inguinal freckling
MedGen UID:
320315
Concept ID:
C1834297
Finding
The presence in the inguinal region (groin) of an increased number of freckles, small circular spots on the skin that are darker than the surrounding skin because of deposits of melanin.
Axillary freckling
MedGen UID:
348082
Concept ID:
C1860335
Finding
The presence in the axillary region (armpit) of an increased number of freckles, small circular spots on the skin that are darker than the surrounding skin because of deposits of melanin.
Spinal neurofibromas
MedGen UID:
869787
Concept ID:
C4024217
Neoplastic Process
Neurofibromas originating in the spine.
Pheochromocytoma
MedGen UID:
505323
Concept ID:
CN002423
Finding
Pheochromocytomas (also known as chromaffin tumors) produce, store, and secrete catecholamines. Pheochromocytomas usually originate from the adrenal medulla but may also develop from chromaffin cells in or about sympathetic ganglia. A common symptom of pheochromocytoma is hypertension owing to release of catecholamines.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Lenders JW, Duh QY, Eisenhofer G, Gimenez-Roqueplo AP, Grebe SK, Murad MH, Naruse M, Pacak K, Young WF Jr; Endocrine Society.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2014 Jun;99(6):1915-42. doi: 10.1210/jc.2014-1498. PMID: 24893135
Chen H, Sippel RS, O'Dorisio MS, Vinik AI, Lloyd RV, Pacak K; North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (NANETS).
Pancreas 2010 Aug;39(6):775-83. doi: 10.1097/MPA.0b013e3181ebb4f0. PMID: 20664475Free PMC Article
Robson ME, Storm CD, Weitzel J, Wollins DS, Offit K; American Society of Clinical Oncology.
J Clin Oncol 2010 Feb 10;28(5):893-901. Epub 2010 Jan 11 doi: 10.1200/JCO.2009.27.0660. PMID: 20065170
Toriello HV, Meck JM; Professional Practice and Guidelines Committee.
Genet Med 2008 Jun;10(6):457-60. doi: 10.1097/GIM.0b013e318176fabb. PMID: 18496227Free PMC Article
Radtke HB, Sebold CD, Allison C, Haidle JL, Schneider G
J Genet Couns 2007 Aug;16(4):387-407. Epub 2007 Jul 17 doi: 10.1007/s10897-007-9101-8. PMID: 17636453
Trepanier A, Ahrens M, McKinnon W, Peters J, Stopfer J, Grumet SC, Manley S, Culver JO, Acton R, Larsen-Haidle J, Correia LA, Bennett R, Pettersen B, Ferlita TD, Costalas JW, Hunt K, Donlon S, Skrzynia C, Farrell C, Callif-Daley F, Vockley CW; National Society of Genetic Counselors.
J Genet Couns 2004 Apr;13(2):83-114. doi: 10.1023/B:JOGC.0000018821.48330.77. PMID: 15604628
Am J Hum Genet 1995 Nov;57(5):1233-41. PMID: 7485175Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Ogle SK, Rose MM, Wildes CT
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 2002 Jul-Aug;19(4):122-6. PMID: 12203191

Diagnosis

Kantaputra PN, van den Ouweland A, Sangruchi T, Limwongse C
Am J Med Genet A 2012 Jul;158A(7):1750-3. Epub 2012 Jun 7 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35422. PMID: 22678692
Goldgar C
JAAPA 2011 Mar;24(3):75-6, 78. PMID: 21434506
Moore BD
Dev Disabil Res Rev 2009;15(1):45-51. doi: 10.1002/ddrr.53. PMID: 19213018
Ogle SK, Rose MM, Wildes CT
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 2002 Jul-Aug;19(4):122-6. PMID: 12203191
Kayl AE, Moore BD 3rd
Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev 2000;6(2):117-24. doi: 10.1002/1098-2779(2000)6:2<117::AID-MRDD5>3.0.CO;2-X. PMID: 10899804

Therapy

Ogle SK, Rose MM, Wildes CT
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 2002 Jul-Aug;19(4):122-6. PMID: 12203191

Prognosis

Kantaputra PN, van den Ouweland A, Sangruchi T, Limwongse C
Am J Med Genet A 2012 Jul;158A(7):1750-3. Epub 2012 Jun 7 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35422. PMID: 22678692
Ogle SK, Rose MM, Wildes CT
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 2002 Jul-Aug;19(4):122-6. PMID: 12203191

Clinical prediction guides

Kantaputra PN, van den Ouweland A, Sangruchi T, Limwongse C
Am J Med Genet A 2012 Jul;158A(7):1750-3. Epub 2012 Jun 7 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35422. PMID: 22678692
Shannon KM, Watterson J, Johnson P, O'Connell P, Lange B, Shah N, Steinherz P, Kan YW, Priest JR
Blood 1992 Mar 1;79(5):1311-8. PMID: 1536955

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center