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Deafness, autosomal recessive 9(DFNB9)

MedGen UID:
331376
Concept ID:
C1832828
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: AUDITORY NEUROPATHY, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE, 1, TEMPERATURE-SENSITIVE; DFNB9; NEUROSENSORY NONSYNDROMIC RECESSIVE DEAFNESS 9; OTOF-Related Deafness
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in homozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, autosomal recessive disorders manifest in homozygotes (with two copies of the mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal recessive inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
 
Gene (location): OTOF (2p23.3)
OMIM®: 601071

Definition

OTOF-related deafness (DFNB9 nonsyndromic hearing loss) is characterized by two phenotypes: prelingual nonsyndromic hearing loss and, less frequently, temperature-sensitive nonsyndromic auditory neuropathy (TS-NSAN). The nonsyndromic hearing loss is bilateral severe-to-profound congenital deafness. In the first one or two years of life, OTOF-related deafness can appear to be an auditory neuropathy based on electrophysiologic testing in which auditory brain stem responses (ABRs) are absent and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are present. However, with time OAEs disappear and electrophysiologic testing is more consistent with a cochlear defect. The distinction between auditory neuropathy and a cochlear defect is important as cochlear implants may be of marginal value in persons with auditory neuropathy but have been shown to be effective for individuals with OTOF-related deafness. TS-NSAN is characterized by normal-to-mild hearing loss in the absence of fever and significant hearing loss ranging from severe to profound in the presence of fever. When the fever resolves, hearing returns to normal. [from GTR]

Additional description

From GeneReviews
OTOF-related deafness (DFNB9 nonsyndromic hearing loss) is characterized by two phenotypes: prelingual nonsyndromic hearing loss and, less frequently, temperature-sensitive nonsyndromic auditory neuropathy (TS-NSAN). The nonsyndromic hearing loss is bilateral severe-to-profound congenital deafness. In the first one or two years of life, OTOF-related deafness can appear to be an auditory neuropathy based on electrophysiologic testing in which auditory brain stem responses (ABRs) are absent and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are present. However, with time OAEs disappear and electrophysiologic testing is more consistent with a cochlear defect. The distinction between auditory neuropathy and a cochlear defect is important as cochlear implants may be of marginal value in persons with auditory neuropathy but have been shown to be effective for individuals with OTOF-related deafness. TS-NSAN is characterized by normal-to-mild hearing loss in the absence of fever and significant hearing loss ranging from severe to profound in the presence of fever. When the fever resolves, hearing returns to normal.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1251

Clinical features

Sensorineural hearing loss
MedGen UID:
9164
Concept ID:
C0018784
Disease or Syndrome
A type of hearing impairment in one or both ears related to an abnormal functionality of the cochlear nerve.
Absence of acoustic reflex
MedGen UID:
322049
Concept ID:
C1832834
Finding
Absence of the acoustic reflex, an involuntary contraction of the stapedius muscle that occurs in response to high-intensity sound stimuli.
Absent brainstem auditory responses
MedGen UID:
322983
Concept ID:
C1836742
Finding
Lack of measurable response to stimulation of auditory evoked potentials.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  

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