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1.

Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles 4

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
468527
Concept ID:
CN120301
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles 1B

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
468526
Concept ID:
CN120300
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
431608
Concept ID:
CN043677
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Polymicrogyria, asymmetric

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
413259
Concept ID:
C2750247
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 3c

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
412956
Concept ID:
C2750404
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 3a, with or without extraocular involvement

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
412638
Concept ID:
C2748801
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 1

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
376943
Concept ID:
C1851102
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital, 2

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
356119
Concept ID:
C1865915
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Tukel syndrome

Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) refers to at least eight genetically defined strabismus syndromes (CFEOM1A, CFEOM1B, CFEOM2, CFEOM3A, CFEOM3B, CFEOM3C, Tukel syndrome, and CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria) characterized by congenital non-progressive ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) with or without ptosis (droopy eyelids) affecting part or all of the oculomotor nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve III) and its innervated muscles (superior, medial, and inferior recti, inferior oblique, and levator palpabrae superioris) and/or the trochlear nucleus and nerve (cranial nerve IV) and its innervated muscle (the superior oblique). In general, affected individuals have severe limitation of vertical gaze (usually upgaze) and variable limitation of horizontal gaze. Individuals with CFEOM frequently compensate for the ophthalmoplegia by maintaining abnormal head positions at rest and by moving their heads rather than their eyes to track objects. Individuals with CFEOM3A may also have intellectual disability, social disability, Kallmann syndrome, facial weakness, and vocal cord paralysis; and/or may develop a progressive sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Individuals with Tukel syndrome also have postaxial oligodactyly or oligosyndactyly of the hands. Those with CFEOM3 with polymicrogyria also have microcephaly and intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
332153
Concept ID:
C1836217
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Duane-radial ray syndrome

SALL4-related disorders include Duane-radial ray syndrome (DRRS, Okihiro syndrome), acro-renal-ocular syndrome (AROS), and SALL4-related Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS), three phenotypes previously thought to be distinct entities: DRRS is characterized by uni- or bilateral Duane anomaly and radial ray malformation that can include thenar hypoplasia and/or hypoplasia or aplasia of the thumbs, hypoplasia or aplasia of the radii, shortening and radial deviation of the forearms, triphalangeal thumbs, and duplication of the thumb (preaxial polydactyly). AROS is characterized by radial ray malformations, renal abnormalities (mild malrotation, ectopia, horseshoe kidney, renal hypoplasia, vesico-ureteral reflux, bladder diverticula), ocular coloboma, and Duane anomaly. Rarely, pathogenic variants in SALL4 may cause clinically typical HOS (i.e., radial ray malformations and cardiac malformations without additional features). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
301647
Concept ID:
C1623209
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Duane syndrome type 1

Duane syndrome is a strabismus syndrome characterized by congenital non-progressive horizontal ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) primarily affecting the abducens nucleus and nerve and its innervated extraocular muscle, the lateral rectus muscle. At birth, affected infants have restricted ability to move the affected eye(s) outward (abduction) and/or inward (adduction). In addition, the globe retracts into the orbit with attempted adduction, accompanied by narrowing of the palpebral fissure. Most individuals with Duane syndrome have strabismus in primary gaze but can use a compensatory head position to align the eyes, and thus can preserve single binocular vision and avoid diplopia. Individuals with Duane syndrome who lack binocular vision are at risk for amblyopia. Approximately 70% of individuals with Duane syndrome have isolated Duane syndrome (i.e., they do not have other detected congenital anomalies). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
201329
Concept ID:
C0994516
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Duane syndrome type 2

Duane syndrome is a strabismus syndrome characterized by congenital non-progressive horizontal ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) primarily affecting the abducens nucleus and nerve and its innervated extraocular muscle, the lateral rectus muscle. At birth, affected infants have restricted ability to move the affected eye(s) outward (abduction) and/or inward (adduction). In addition, the globe retracts into the orbit with attempted adduction, accompanied by narrowing of the palpebral fissure. Most individuals with Duane syndrome have strabismus in primary gaze but can use a compensatory head position to align the eyes, and thus can preserve single binocular vision and avoid diplopia. Individuals with Duane syndrome who lack binocular vision are at risk for amblyopia. Approximately 70% of individuals with Duane syndrome have isolated Duane syndrome (i.e., they do not have other detected congenital anomalies). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
196721
Concept ID:
C0751083
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Duane syndrome

Duane syndrome is a strabismus syndrome characterized by congenital non-progressive horizontal ophthalmoplegia (inability to move the eyes) primarily affecting the abducens nucleus and nerve and its innervated extraocular muscle, the lateral rectus muscle. At birth, affected infants have restricted ability to move the affected eye(s) outward (abduction) and/or inward (adduction). In addition, the globe retracts into the orbit with attempted adduction, accompanied by narrowing of the palpebral fissure. Most individuals with Duane syndrome have strabismus in primary gaze but can use a compensatory head position to align the eyes, and thus can preserve single binocular vision and avoid diplopia. Individuals with Duane syndrome who lack binocular vision are at risk for amblyopia. Approximately 70% of individuals with Duane syndrome have isolated Duane syndrome (i.e., they do not have other detected congenital anomalies). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
4413
Concept ID:
C0013261
Disease or Syndrome
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