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1.

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), caused by defective lymphocyte homeostasis, is characterized by: Non-malignant lymphoproliferation (lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly with or without hypersplenism) that often improves with age; Autoimmune disease, mostly directed toward blood cells; and Lifelong increased risk for both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In ALPS-FAS (the most common and best-characterized type of ALPS, associated with heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS), non-malignant lymphoproliferation typically manifests in the first years of life, inexplicably waxes and wanes, and then often decreases without treatment in the second decade of life; however, neither splenomegaly nor the overall expansion of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood decreases in many affected individuals. Although autoimmunity is often not present at the time of diagnosis or at the time of the most extensive lymphoproliferation, autoantibodies can be detected before autoimmune disease manifests clinically. ALPS-FAS caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous (biallelic) pathogenic variants in FAS is characterized by severe lymphoproliferation before, at, or shortly after birth, and usually results in death at an early age. ALPS-sFAS, resulting from somatic FAS pathogenic variants in selected cell populations, notably the alpha/beta double-negative T cells (a/ß-DNT cells), appears to be similar to ALPS-FAS resulting from heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS, keeping in mind that those with somatic pathogenic variants need to be better characterized, particularly with regard to the risk for lymphoma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
231300
Concept ID:
C1328840
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Lymphoproliferative syndrome

MedGen UID:
799717
Concept ID:
CN201619
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, type 2

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), caused by defective lymphocyte homeostasis, is characterized by: Non-malignant lymphoproliferation (lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly with or without hypersplenism) that often improves with age; Autoimmune disease, mostly directed toward blood cells; and Lifelong increased risk for both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In ALPS-FAS (the most common and best-characterized type of ALPS, associated with heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS), non-malignant lymphoproliferation typically manifests in the first years of life, inexplicably waxes and wanes, and then often decreases without treatment in the second decade of life; however, neither splenomegaly nor the overall expansion of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood decreases in many affected individuals. Although autoimmunity is often not present at the time of diagnosis or at the time of the most extensive lymphoproliferation, autoantibodies can be detected before autoimmune disease manifests clinically. ALPS-FAS caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous (biallelic) pathogenic variants in FAS is characterized by severe lymphoproliferation before, at, or shortly after birth, and usually results in death at an early age. ALPS-sFAS, resulting from somatic FAS pathogenic variants in selected cell populations, notably the alpha/beta double-negative T cells (a/ß-DNT cells), appears to be similar to ALPS-FAS resulting from heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS, keeping in mind that those with somatic pathogenic variants need to be better characterized, particularly with regard to the risk for lymphoma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349065
Concept ID:
C1858968
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Autoimmune reaction

A specific humoral or cell-mediated immune response against autologous (self) antigens. An autoimmune process may produce or be caused by autoimmune disease and may be developmentally complex, not necessarily pathological, and possibly pervasive. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105217
Concept ID:
C0443146
Pathologic Function
5.

Fetal alcohol syndrome

Alcohol can harm your baby at any stage during a pregnancy. That includes the earliest stages before you even know you are pregnant. Drinking alcohol can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Effects can include physical and behavioral problems such as trouble with. -Learning and remembering. -Understanding and following directions. -Controlling emotions. -Communicating and socializing. -Daily life skills, such as feeding and bathing. Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, including wide-set and narrow eyes, growth problems and nervous system abnormalities. FASDs last a lifetime. There is no cure for FASDs. Treatments can help. These include medicines to help with some symptoms and behavior therapy. No one treatment is right for every child. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8820
Concept ID:
C0015923
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Lymphadenopathy

Enlargment (swelling) of a lymph node. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
96929
Concept ID:
C0497156
Finding
7.

Sepsis

Sepsis is a serious illness. It happens when your body has an overwhelming immune response to a bacterial infection. The chemicals released into the blood to fight the infection trigger widespread inflammation. This leads to blood clots and leaky blood vessels. They cause poor blood flow, which deprives your body's organs of nutrients and oxygen. In severe cases, one or more organs fail. In the worst cases, blood pressure drops and the heart weakens, leading to septic shock. Anyone can get sepsis, but the risk is higher in. -People with weakened immune systems. -Infants and children. -The elderly. -People with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and kidney or liver disease. -People suffering from a severe burn or physical trauma. Common symptoms of sepsis are fever, chills, rapid breathing and heart rate, rash, confusion, and disorientation. Doctors diagnose sepsis using a blood test to see if the number of white blood cells is abnormal. They also do lab tests that check for signs of infection. People with sepsis are usually treated in hospital intensive care units. Doctors try to treat the infection, sustain the vital organs, and prevent a drop in blood pressure. Many patients receive oxygen and intravenous fluids. Other types of treatment, such as respirators or kidney dialysis, may be necessary. Sometimes, surgery is needed to clear up an infection. NIH: National Institute of General Medical Sciences.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
69314
Concept ID:
C0243026
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Splenomegaly

Enlargement of the spleen. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
52469
Concept ID:
C0038002
Finding
9.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have a weakened immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as . -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will diagnose lymphoma with a physical exam, blood tests, a chest x-ray, and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. If you don't have symptoms, you may not need treatment right away. This is called watchful waiting. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
10.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hypergammaglobulinemia

An excess of GAMMA-GLOBULINS in the serum due to chronic infections or PARAPROTEINEMIAS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9362
Concept ID:
C0020455
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Increased antibody level in blood

An increased level of gamma globulin (immunoglobulin) in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
892675
Concept ID:
C2048011
Laboratory or Test Result
13.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Lymphoma

A cancer originating in lymphocytes and presenting as a solid tumor of lymhpoid cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505322
Concept ID:
CN002422
Finding
15.

Novel Mutation

A newly discovered, distinct gene alteration; NOT the same as new or de novo mutation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
457664
Concept ID:
C2985438
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
16.

Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect

MedGen UID:
396060
Concept ID:
C1861101
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Autosomal dominant inheritance

Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Genetic Function; Intellectual Product
18.

Generalized lymphadenopathy

A generalized form of lymphadenopathy. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
96909
Concept ID:
C0476486
Pathologic Function
19.

Sepsis

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
48626
Concept ID:
C0036690
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Abnormality of the lymphatic system

The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of. -Lymph - a fluid that contains white blood cells that defend against germs. -Lymph vessels - vessels that carry lymph throughout your body. They are different from blood vessels. -Lymph nodes - glands found throughout the lymph vessels. Along with your spleen, these nodes are where white blood cells fight infection. Your bone marrow and thymus produce the cells in lymph. They are part of the system, too. The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. If it's not working properly, fluid builds in your tissues and causes swelling, called lymphedema. Other lymphatic system problems can include infections, blockage, and cancer.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9829
Concept ID:
C0024228
Disease or Syndrome
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