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1.

Hyperplasia

An abnormal increase in the number of cells in an organ or a tissue with consequent enlargement. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
43784
Concept ID:
C0020507
Pathologic Function
2.

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose. In most people, this raises blood sugar. If it doesn't, you have hypoglycemia, and your blood sugar can be dangerously low. Signs include . -Hunger. -Shakiness. -Dizziness. -Confusion. -Difficulty speaking. -Feeling anxious or weak. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia is often a side effect of diabetes medicines. Eating or drinking something with carbohydrates can help. If it happens often, your health care provider may need to change your treatment plan. You can also have low blood sugar without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6979
Concept ID:
C0020615
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Familial hyperinsulinism

Familial hyperinsulinism (referred to as FHI in this GeneReview) is characterized by hypoglycemia that ranges from severe neonatal-onset, difficult-to-manage disease to childhood-onset disease with mild symptoms and difficult-to-diagnose hypoglycemia. Neonatal-onset disease manifests within hours to two days after birth. Childhood-onset disease manifests during the first months or years of life. In the newborn period, presenting symptoms may be nonspecific, including seizures, hypotonia, poor feeding, and apnea. In severe cases, serum glucose concentrations are typically extremely low and thus easily recognized, whereas in milder cases, variable and mild hypoglycemia may make the diagnosis more difficult. Even within the same family, disease manifestations can range from mild to severe. Individuals with autosomal recessive familial hyperinsulinism, caused by pathogenic variants in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 (FHI-KATP), tend to be large for gestational age and usually present with severe refractory hypoglycemia in the first 48 hours of life; affected infants usually respond only partially to diet or medical management (i.e., diazoxide therapy) and thus may require pancreatic resection. Individuals with autosomal dominant FHI-KATP tend to be appropriate for gestational age at birth, to present at approximately age one year (range: 2 days - 30 years), and to respond to diet and diazoxide therapy. Exceptions to both of these generalities have been reported. FHI-GCK, caused by pathogenic variants in GCK, may be much milder than FHI-KATP; however, some persons have severe, diazoxide-unresponsive hypoglycemia. FHI-HADH, caused by pathogenic variants in HADH, tends to be relatively mild, although severe cases have been reported. Individuals with FHI-HNF4A, caused by pathogenic variants in HNF4A, are typically born large for gestational age and have mild features that respond to diazoxide treatment. FHI-UCP2, caused by pathgoenic variants in UCP2, is a rare cause of diazoxide-responsive FH1. Hyperammonemia/hyperinsulinism (HA/HI) is associated with mild-to-moderate hyperammonemia and with relatively mild, late-onset hypoglycemia; most but not all affected individuals have pathogenic variants in GLUD1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854723
Concept ID:
C3888018
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
4.

Autoimmune interstitial lung, joint, and kidney disease

Autoimmune interstitial lung, joint, and kidney disease is an autosomal dominant systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by interstitial lung disease, inflammatory arthritis, and immune complex-mediated renal disease. Laboratory studies show high-titer autoantibodies. Symptoms appear in the first 2 decades of life, but there is incomplete penetrance (summary by Watkin et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
452265
Concept ID:
C0231330
Temporal Concept
5.

Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia

An increased concentration of insulin combined with a decreased concentration of glucose in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
351247
Concept ID:
C1864903
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
6.

Sporadic

Cases of the disease in question occur without a previous family history, i.e., as isolated cases without being transmitted from a parent and without other siblings being affected. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
342827
Concept ID:
C1853237
Finding
7.

Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

Familial hyperinsulinism (referred to as FHI in this GeneReview) is characterized by hypoglycemia that ranges from severe neonatal-onset, difficult-to-manage disease to childhood-onset disease with mild symptoms and difficult-to-diagnose hypoglycemia. Neonatal-onset disease manifests within hours to two days after birth. Childhood-onset disease manifests during the first months or years of life. In the newborn period, presenting symptoms may be nonspecific, including seizures, hypotonia, poor feeding, and apnea. In severe cases, serum glucose concentrations are typically extremely low and thus easily recognized, whereas in milder cases, variable and mild hypoglycemia may make the diagnosis more difficult. Even within the same family, disease manifestations can range from mild to severe. Individuals with autosomal recessive familial hyperinsulinism, caused by pathogenic variants in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 (FHI-KATP), tend to be large for gestational age and usually present with severe refractory hypoglycemia in the first 48 hours of life; affected infants usually respond only partially to diet or medical management (i.e., diazoxide therapy) and thus may require pancreatic resection. Individuals with autosomal dominant FHI-KATP tend to be appropriate for gestational age at birth, to present at approximately age one year (range: 2 days - 30 years), and to respond to diet and diazoxide therapy. Exceptions to both of these generalities have been reported. FHI-GCK, caused by pathogenic variants in GCK, may be much milder than FHI-KATP; however, some persons have severe, diazoxide-unresponsive hypoglycemia. FHI-HADH, caused by pathogenic variants in HADH, tends to be relatively mild, although severe cases have been reported. Individuals with FHI-HNF4A, caused by pathogenic variants in HNF4A, are typically born large for gestational age and have mild features that respond to diazoxide treatment. FHI-UCP2, caused by pathgoenic variants in UCP2, is a rare cause of diazoxide-responsive FH1. Hyperammonemia/hyperinsulinism (HA/HI) is associated with mild-to-moderate hyperammonemia and with relatively mild, late-onset hypoglycemia; most but not all affected individuals have pathogenic variants in GLUD1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
226230
Concept ID:
C1257959
8.

Focal

Area of greatest concentration, attention, or activity; a central point or locus, especially of an infection. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61391
Concept ID:
C0205234
Spatial Concept
9.

Islet cell hyperplasia

Familial hyperinsulinism (referred to as FHI in this GeneReview) is characterized by hypoglycemia that ranges from severe neonatal-onset, difficult-to-manage disease to childhood-onset disease with mild symptoms and difficult-to-diagnose hypoglycemia. Neonatal-onset disease manifests within hours to two days after birth. Childhood-onset disease manifests during the first months or years of life. In the newborn period, presenting symptoms may be nonspecific, including seizures, hypotonia, poor feeding, and apnea. In severe cases, serum glucose concentrations are typically extremely low and thus easily recognized, whereas in milder cases, variable and mild hypoglycemia may make the diagnosis more difficult. Even within the same family, disease manifestations can range from mild to severe. Individuals with autosomal recessive familial hyperinsulinism, caused by pathogenic variants in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 (FHI-KATP), tend to be large for gestational age and usually present with severe refractory hypoglycemia in the first 48 hours of life; affected infants usually respond only partially to diet or medical management (i.e., diazoxide therapy) and thus may require pancreatic resection. Individuals with autosomal dominant FHI-KATP tend to be appropriate for gestational age at birth, to present at approximately age one year (range: 2 days - 30 years), and to respond to diet and diazoxide therapy. Exceptions to both of these generalities have been reported. FHI-GCK, caused by pathogenic variants in GCK, may be much milder than FHI-KATP; however, some persons have severe, diazoxide-unresponsive hypoglycemia. FHI-HADH, caused by pathogenic variants in HADH, tends to be relatively mild, although severe cases have been reported. Individuals with FHI-HNF4A, caused by pathogenic variants in HNF4A, are typically born large for gestational age and have mild features that respond to diazoxide treatment. FHI-UCP2, caused by pathgoenic variants in UCP2, is a rare cause of diazoxide-responsive FH1. Hyperammonemia/hyperinsulinism (HA/HI) is associated with mild-to-moderate hyperammonemia and with relatively mild, late-onset hypoglycemia; most but not all affected individuals have pathogenic variants in GLUD1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
45047
Concept ID:
C0027773
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Insulin

Insulin (51 aa, ~6 kDa) is encoded by the human INS gene. This protein is involved in the direct regulation of glucose metabolism. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5827
Concept ID:
C0021641
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Hormone; Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Diazoxide

A benzothiadiazine derivative that is a peripheral vasodilator used for hypertensive emergencies. It lacks diuretic effect, apparently because it lacks a sulfonamide group. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3805
Concept ID:
C0012022
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Focal hyperplasia

MedGen UID:
689994
Concept ID:
C1265932
Pathologic Function
13.

Profound

Having an extremely high degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of more than five standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
615266
Concept ID:
C0439808
Qualitative Concept
14.

Maternal

Having to do with the mother, coming from the mother, or related through the mother. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
348949
Concept ID:
C1858460
Finding
15.

Abnormality

A condition that differs from the usual physical or mental state. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
309940
Concept ID:
C1704258
Finding
16.

Ability to balance

The maintenance of a stable, upright body position. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
154340
Concept ID:
C0560184
Finding
17.

Heterogeneous

The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
67020
Concept ID:
C0242960
Organism Attribute
18.

Lesion

A localized pathological or traumatic structural change, damage, deformity, or discontinuity of tissue, organ, or body part. (NCI) [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
65128
Concept ID:
C0221198
Finding
19.

Diffuse

A spatial pattern that is spread out, i.e., not localized. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
61387
Concept ID:
C0205219
Spatial Concept
20.

Disorder of glucose metabolism

Pathological conditions in which the BLOOD GLUCOSE cannot be maintained within the normal range, such as in HYPOGLYCEMIA and HYPERGLYCEMIA. Etiology of these disorders varies. Plasma glucose concentration is critical to survival for it is the predominant fuel for the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
226229
Concept ID:
C1257958
Disease or Syndrome
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