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1.

BIDS brittle hair-impaired intellect-decreased fertility-short stature syndrome

Trichothiodystrophy, which is commonly called TTD, is a rare inherited condition that affects many parts of the body. The hallmark of this condition is brittle hair that is sparse and easily broken. Tests show that the hair is lacking sulfur, an element that normally gives hair its strength.The signs and symptoms of trichothiodystrophy vary widely. Mild cases may involve only the hair. More severe cases also cause delayed development, significant intellectual disability, and recurrent infections; severely affected individuals may survive only into infancy or early childhood.Mothers of children with trichothiodystrophy may experience problems during pregnancy including pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia) and a related condition called HELLP syndrome that can damage the liver. Babies with trichothiodystrophy are at increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, and slow growth.Most affected children have short stature compared to others their age. Intellectual disability and delayed development are common, although most affected individuals are highly social with an outgoing and engaging personality. Some have brain abnormalities that can be seen with imaging tests. Trichothiodystrophy is also associated with recurrent infections, particularly respiratory infections, which can be life-threatening. Other features of trichothiodystrophy can include dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis); abnormalities of the fingernails and toenails; clouding of the lens in both eyes from birth (congenital cataracts); poor coordination; and skeletal abnormalities.About half of all people with trichothiodystrophy have a photosensitive form of the disorder, which causes them to be extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. They develop a severe sunburn after spending just a few minutes in the sun. However, for reasons that are unclear, they do not develop other sun-related problems such as excessive freckling of the skin or an increased risk of skin cancer. Many people with trichothiodystrophy report that they do not sweat.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
149256
Concept ID:
C0740342
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group b

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals), with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years in most affected individuals; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
373493
Concept ID:
C1970808
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Cockayne syndrome

Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or “moderate” form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome (COFS) or Pena-Shokeir syndrome type II; CS type III, a milder form; Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS). CS type I (moderate CS) is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II (severe CS or early-onset CS) is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age seven years. CS type III (mild CS or late-onset CS) is characterized by essentially normal growth and cognitive development or by late onset. Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, including intellectual disability, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS dysmyelination and calcifications. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
40363
Concept ID:
C0009207
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Xeroderma pigmentosum

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals), with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years in most affected individuals; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21943
Concept ID:
C0043346
Congenital Abnormality
5.

Ichthyosis

Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7002
Concept ID:
C0020757
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
6.

Ichthyosis

An abnormality of the skin characterized the presence of excessive amounts of dry surface scales on the skin resulting from an abnormality of keratinization. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
429191
Concept ID:
CN007091
Finding
7.

Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect

MedGen UID:
396060
Concept ID:
C1861101
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Photoparoxysmal response 1

The photoparoxysmal response (PPR), also referred to as photosensitivity, is defined as the abnormal occurrence of cortical spikes or spike and wave discharges on electroencephalogram (EEG) in response to intermittent light stimulation (Doose and Waltz, 1993). Photosensitivity is a frequent finding in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (see 600669), especially those with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, suggesting a common epileptogenic pathway for both phenomena. The comorbidity of the 2 disorders suggests that presence of PPR may also increase the risk for epilepsy (Stephani et al., 2004; Tauer et al., 2005). Genetic Heterogeneity of Photoparoxysmal Response The PPR1 locus has been mapped to chromosome 6p21. See also PPR2 (609572), mapped to chromosome 13q31, and PPR3 (609573), mapped to chromosome 7q32. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
358382
Concept ID:
C1868677
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
9.

Trichothiodystrophy 1, photosensitive

Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which patients have brittle, sulfur-deficient hair that displays a diagnostic alternating light and dark banding pattern, called 'tiger tail banding,' under polarizing microscopy. TTD patients display a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous, neurologic, and growth abnormalities. Common additional clinical features are ichthyosis, intellectual/developmental disabilities, decreased fertility, abnormal characteristics at birth, ocular abnormalities, short stature, and infections. There are both photosensitive and nonphotosensitive forms of the disorder. TTD patients have not been reported to have a predisposition to cancer (summary by Faghri et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Trichothiodystrophy Also see TTD2 (616390), caused by mutation in the ERCC3/XPB gene (133510); TTD3 (616395), caused by mutation in the GTF2H5 gene (608780); TTD4 (234050), caused by mutation in the MPLKIP gene (609188); TTD5 (300953), caused by mutation in the RNF113A gene (300951); and TTD6 (616943), caused by mutation in the GTF2E2 gene (189964). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
355730
Concept ID:
C1866504
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Intellectual disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, has been defined as an IQ score below 70. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
334384
Concept ID:
C1843367
Finding
11.

Phenotypic variability

A variability of phenotypic features. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
326537
Concept ID:
C1839608
Finding
12.

Mild

Mild; asymptomatic or mild symptoms; clinical or diagnostic observations only; intervention not indicated. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
268697
Concept ID:
C1513302
Finding
13.

Brittle hair

Fragile, easily breakable hair, i.e., with reduced tensile strength. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
120480
Concept ID:
C0263490
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Photogenic epilepsy

MedGen UID:
98285
Concept ID:
C0393720
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Cutaneous photosensitivity

increased sensitivity of the skin to light and other sources of UV [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
87601
Concept ID:
C0349506
Finding; Pathologic Function
16.

Xeroderma pigmentosum, group D

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals), with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years in most affected individuals; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75656
Concept ID:
C0268138
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
17.

Neoplasm of the skin

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. . Anyone can get skin cancer, but it is more common in people who . - Spend a lot of time in the sun or have been sunburned. - Have light-colored skin, hair and eyes. - Have a family member with skin cancer. - Are over age 50. You should have your doctor check any suspicious skin markings and any changes in the way your skin looks. Treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and biologic therapy. PDT uses a drug and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
40101
Concept ID:
C0007114
Neoplastic Process
18.

Intellectual functioning disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, has been defined as an IQ score below 70. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7544
Concept ID:
C0025362
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
19.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Abnormality of the skin

An abnormality of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
11449
Concept ID:
C0037268
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
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