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1.

Cavernous hemangioma

The presence of a cavernous hemangioma. A hemangioma characterized by large endothelial spaces (caverns) is called a cavernous hemangioma. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
9184
Concept ID:
C0018920
Neoplastic Process
2.

Cerebral cavernous malformation

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations in the brain and spinal cord comprising closely clustered, enlarged capillary channels (caverns) with a single layer of endothelium without mature vessel wall elements or normal intervening brain parenchyma. The diameter of CCMs ranges from a few millimeters to several centimeters. CCMs increase or decrease in size and increase in number over time. Hundreds of lesions may be identified, depending on the person’s age and the quality and type of brain imaging used. Although CCMs have been reported in infants and children, the majority become evident between the second and fifth decades with findings such as seizures, focal neurologic deficits, nonspecific headaches, and cerebral hemorrhage. Up to 50% of individuals with FCCM remain symptom free throughout their lives. Cutaneous vascular lesions are found in 9% of those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCM; see Diagnosis/testing) and retinal vascular lesions in almost 5%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349362
Concept ID:
C1861784
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Cerebral cavernous malformations 1

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations in the brain and spinal cord comprising closely clustered, enlarged capillary channels (caverns) with a single layer of endothelium without mature vessel wall elements or normal intervening brain parenchyma. The diameter of CCMs ranges from a few millimeters to several centimeters. CCMs increase or decrease in size and increase in number over time. Hundreds of lesions may be identified, depending on the person’s age and the quality and type of brain imaging used. Although CCMs have been reported in infants and children, the majority become evident between the second and fifth decades with findings such as seizures, focal neurologic deficits, nonspecific headaches, and cerebral hemorrhage. Up to 50% of individuals with FCCM remain symptom free throughout their lives. Cutaneous vascular lesions are found in 9% of those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCM; see Diagnosis/testing) and retinal vascular lesions in almost 5%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
237128
Concept ID:
C1366911
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Biologically Active Substance; Disease or Syndrome
4.

Seizures

Seizures are symptoms of a brain problem. They happen because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures cause convulsions. There are many types of seizures and some have mild symptoms. Seizures fall into two main groups. Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, happen in just one part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity on both sides of the brain. . Most seizures last from 30 seconds to 2 minutes and do not cause lasting harm. However, it is a medical emergency if seizures last longer than 5 minutes or if a person has many seizures and does not wake up between them. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20693
Concept ID:
C0036572
Sign or Symptom
5.

Hemorrhage

Bleeding is the loss of blood. It can happen inside or outside the body. Bleeding can be a reaction to a cut or other wound. It can also result from an injury to internal organs. There are many situations in which you might bleed. A bruise is bleeding under the skin. Some strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain. Other bleeding, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, coughing up blood, or vaginal bleeding, can be a symptom of a disease. Normally, when you bleed, your blood forms clots to stop the bleeding. Severe bleeding may require first aid or a trip to the emergency room. If you have a bleeding disorder, your blood does not form clots normally.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5503
Concept ID:
C0019080
Finding; Pathologic Function
6.

Neurologic

MedGen UID:
880863
Concept ID:
CN236425
Finding
7.

Seizures

MedGen UID:
851405
Concept ID:
CN232558
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Migraine

Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by episodic attacks of headache and associated symptoms. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505085
Concept ID:
CN001878
Finding
9.

Autosomal dominant inheritance

Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Genetic Function; Intellectual Product
10.

Migraine

Migraine is the most common type of chronic, episodic headache, as summarized by Featherstone (1985). One locus for migraine with or without aura (MGR1) has been identified on chromosome 4q24. Other loci for migraine have been identified on 6p21.1-p12.2 (MGR3; 607498), 14q21.2-q22.3 (MGR4; 607501), 19p13 (MGR5; 607508), 1q31 (MGR6; 607516), 15q11-q13 (MGR7; 609179), 5q21 (with or without aura, MGR8, 609570; with aura, MGR9, 609670), 17p13 (MGR10; 610208), 18q12 (MGR11; 610209), 10q22-q23 (MGR12; 611706), and the X chromosome (MGR2; 300125). Mutation in the KCNK18 gene (613655) on chromosome 10q25 causes migraine with aura (MGR13; 613656). A subtype of autosomal dominant migraine with aura (MA), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM; see 141500), is caused by mutation in the CACNA1A gene (601011) on chromosome 19p13 (FHM1; 141500), by mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (182340) on chromosome 1q21 (FHM2; 602481), or by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389) on chromosome 2q24 (FHM3; 609634). Another locus for FHM has been mapped to chromosome 1q31 (FHM4; see 607516). There is evidence that a polymorphism in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1; 133430.0005) and a polymorphism in the TNF gene (191160.0004) may confer susceptibility to migraine. A polymorphism in the endothelin receptor type A gene (EDNRA; 131243.0001) may confer resistance to migraine. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
57451
Concept ID:
C0149931
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Seizure Disorders

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters of nerve cells, or neurons, in the brain send out the wrong signals. People may have strange sensations and emotions or behave strangely. They may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, and abnormal brain development. In many cases, the cause is unknown. Doctors use brain scans and other tests to diagnose epilepsy. It is important to start treatment right away. There is no cure for epilepsy, but medicines can control seizures for most people. When medicines are not working well, surgery or implanted devices such as vagus nerve stimulators may help. Special diets can help some children with epilepsy. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4506
Concept ID:
C0014544
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Chorangioma

Hamartoma-like growth in the placenta consisting of blood vessels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
195606
Concept ID:
C0677608
Neoplastic Process
13.

Abnormality of the nervous system

An abnormality of the nervous system that is present at birth or detected in the neonatal period. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105425
Concept ID:
C0497552
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
14.

Neoplasm of the central nervous system

A neoplasm of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
88335
Concept ID:
C0085136
Neoplastic Process
15.

Neoplasm of the nervous system

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
45046
Concept ID:
C0027766
Neoplastic Process
16.

Unspecified encephalopathy

Encephalopathy is a term that means brain disease, damage, or malfunction. In general, encephalopathy is manifested by an altered mental state. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
39314
Concept ID:
C0085584
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Neoplasm of brain

A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, and they start somewhere else in the body and move to the brain. Brain tumors can cause many symptoms. Some of the most common are. -Headaches, often in the morning . -Nausea and vomiting. -Changes in your ability to talk, hear, or see. -Problems with balance or walking. -Problems with thinking or memory . -Feeling weak or sleepy. -Changes in your mood or behavior. -Seizures. Doctors diagnose brain tumors by doing a neurologic exam and tests including an MRI, CT scan, and biopsy. Treatment options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Many people get a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14216
Concept ID:
C0006118
Neoplastic Process
19.

Vascular neoplasm

A benign or malignant neoplasm (tumour) originating in the vascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
10299
Concept ID:
C0027668
Neoplastic Process
20.

Hemangioma

A hemangioma is a benign tumor characterized by blood-filled spaces lined by benign endothelial cells. A hemangioma characterized by large endothelial spaces (caverns) is called a cavernous hemangioma (in contrast to a hemangioma with small endothelial spaces, which is called capillary hemangioma). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
5477
Concept ID:
C0018916
Neoplastic Process
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