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Items: 7

1.

Infertility

Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can get pregnant but keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of having unprotected sex, about 15 percent of couples are unable to get pregnant. About a third of the time, infertility can be traced to the woman. In another third of cases, it is because of the man. The rest of the time, it is because of both partners or no cause can be found. There are treatments that are specifically for men or for women. Some involve both partners. Drugs, assisted reproductive technology, and surgery are common treatments. Happily, many couples treated for infertility go on to have babies. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
43876
Concept ID:
C0021359
Finding; Pathologic Function
2.

Infertility

MedGen UID:
504598
Concept ID:
CN000737
Finding
3.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
Organism Function
4.

Polymenorrhea

Frequent menses; menstrual cycles lasting less than 21 days. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
18557
Concept ID:
C0032519
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Female infertility

Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 months if the woman is over age 35). If a woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, hormone problems, and lifestyle or environmental factors. Most cases of infertility in women result from problems with producing eggs. In premature ovarian failure, the ovaries stop functioning before natural menopause. In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the ovaries may not release an egg regularly or they may not release a healthy egg. About a third of the time, infertility is because of a problem with the woman. One third of the time, it is a problem with the man. Sometimes no cause can be found. If you think you might be infertile, see your doctor. There are tests that may tell if you have fertility problems. When it is possible to find the cause, treatments may include medicines, surgery, or assisted reproductive technologies. Happily, many couples treated for infertility are able to have babies. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5795
Concept ID:
C0021361
Pathologic Function
6.

Follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency, isolated

Subnormal concentration of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), associated with mutations in the FSHB gene, encoding follitropin subunit beta. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
341603
Concept ID:
C1856716
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Isolated lutropin deficiency

Male patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to isolated luteinizing hormone (LH) deficiency have normal sexual differentiation but fail to develop spontaneous puberty. Absence of LH alters Leydig cell proliferation and maturation and impairs the onset of normal spermatogenesis, which requires high levels of intratesticular testosterone. Infertility and very low levels of spermatogenesis generally persist in affected men despite long-term exposure to gonadotropin therapy. Female patients exhibit normal pubertal development and menarche, followed by oligomenorrhea and anovulatory secondary amenorrhea (summary by Basciani et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, see 147950. Reviews Arnhold et al. (2009) noted that the clinical manifestations of female patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to mutations in LHB are very similar to those of women with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism due to inactivating mutations of the LH receptor (see 238320): all have female external genitalia, spontaneous development of normal pubic hair and breasts at puberty, and normal to late menarche followed by oligoamenorrhea and infertility. Pelvic ultrasound shows a small or normal uterus and normal or enlarged ovaries with cysts. However, women with LHB mutations can be treated with luteinizing hormone or chorionic gonadotropin (CG; 118860) replacement therapy; women with LH receptor mutations are resistant to LH, and no treatment is effective in recovering their fertility. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82881
Concept ID:
C0271582
Disease or Syndrome
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