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Items: 1 to 20 of 36

1.

Bipolar

MedGen UID:
912721
Concept ID:
CN244029
Finding
2.

Mania

A state of abnormally elevated or irritable mood, arousal, and or energy levels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
137909
Concept ID:
C0338831
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Recurrence (disease attribute)

The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
416712
Concept ID:
C2825055
Pathologic Function
4.

Symptoms of depression

MedGen UID:
39170
Concept ID:
C0086132
Sign or Symptom
5.

Diagnosis

Description:The source act is intended to help establish the presence of a (an adverse) situation described by the target act. This is not limited to diseases but can apply to any adverse situation or condition of medical or technical nature.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
6.

Bipolar affective disorder

Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go from very happy, up, and active to very sad and hopeless, down, and inactive, and then back again. They often have normal moods in between. The up feeling is called mania. The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. Abnormal brain structure and function may also play a role. Bipolar disorder often starts in a person's late teen or early adult years. But children and adults can have bipolar disorder too. The illness usually lasts a lifetime. If you think you may have it, tell your health care provider. A medical checkup can rule out other illnesses that might cause your mood changes. If not treated, bipolar disorder can lead to damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. However, there are effective treatments to control symptoms: medicine and talk therapy. A combination usually works best. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2649
Concept ID:
C0005586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful - it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include. -Panic disorder . -Obsessive-compulsive disorder . -Post-traumatic stress disorder . -Phobias . -Generalized anxiety disorder . Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1613
Concept ID:
C0003467
Finding; Finding
8.

Illness

A state of ill health, bodily malfunction, or discomfort. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
526241
Concept ID:
C0221423
Sign or Symptom
9.

Improved

Condition changed and/or recovered [from CCC]

MedGen UID:
512204
Concept ID:
C0184511
Finding
10.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
11.

Major affective disorder 1

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme shifts in mood, energy, and behavior. This disorder most often appears in late adolescence or early adulthood, although symptoms can begin at any time of life.People with bipolar disorder experience both dramatic "highs," called manic episodes, and "lows," called depressive episodes. These episodes can last from hours to weeks, and many people have no symptoms between episodes. Manic episodes are characterized by increased energy and activity, irritability, restlessness, an inability to sleep, and reckless behavior. Depressive episodes are marked by low energy and activity, a feeling of hopelessness, and an inability to perform everyday tasks. People with bipolar disorder often have repeated thoughts of death and suicide, and they have a much greater risk of dying by suicide than the general population.Manic and depressive episodes can include psychotic symptoms, such as false perceptions (hallucinations) or strongly held false beliefs (delusions). Mixed episodes, which have features of manic and depressive episodes at the same time, also occur in some affected individuals.Bipolar disorder often occurs with other mental health conditions, including anxiety disorders (such as panic attacks), behavioral disorders (such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), and substance abuse.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
377615
Concept ID:
C1852197
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Anxiety

Human personality is shaped by genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that the genetic component is highly complex, polygenic, and epistatic. Genetic factors are thought to contribute to 40 to 60% of trait variance. Molecular genetics has tried to identify specific genes for quantitative traits, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The QTL concept suggests that complex personality traits or dimensions are not attributable to single genes, but to multiple interacting genes (Reif and Lesch, 2003). Fullerton et al. (2003) stated that psychologists were in agreement that the wide variation in human personalities can be explained by a small number of personality factors, including neuroticism (a measure of emotional stability), which manifests at one extreme as anxiety, depression, moodiness, low self-esteem, and diffidence. They cited a number of studies that had described a relationship between high scores on measures of neuroticism and major depressive disorder. They also noted that theoretical studies had suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained sibs could be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. See also panic disorder (PAND1; 167870), which is a subtype of anxiety disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335849
Concept ID:
C1842981
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
13.

Symptoms

An indication that a person has a condition or disease. Some examples of symptoms are headache, fever, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and pain. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
306142
Concept ID:
C1457887
Sign or Symptom
14.

Family history

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed. . You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful. . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
69143
Concept ID:
C0241889
Finding
15.

Onset

The age group in which disease manifestations appear. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
64519
Concept ID:
C0206132
Quantitative Concept
16.

Pharmaceutical Preparations

You may need to take medicines every day, or only once in a while. Either way, you want to make sure that the medicines are safe and will help you get better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety and effectiveness of both prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with food or other medicines you may be taking. They may not be safe during pregnancy. To reduce the risk of reactions and make sure that you get better, it is important for you to take your medicines correctly and be careful when giving medicines to children.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8496
Concept ID:
C0013227
Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Bipolar and Related Disorders

These disorders are related to both SCHIZOPHRENIA SPECTRUM AND RELATED DISORDERS and DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS in terms of symptomatology, family history, and genetics. (DSM-V) . [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
875788
Concept ID:
C4042924
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
19.

Mood disorder

Most people feel sad or irritable from time to time. They may say they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional state. Nearly one in ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include depression and bipolar disorder (also called manic depression). Mood disorders can increase a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases. Treatments include medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of both. With treatment, most people with mood disorders can lead productive lives.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
99866
Concept ID:
C0525045
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

Depression, Neurotic

A term used for any state of depression that is not psychotic. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
76370
Concept ID:
C0282126
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
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