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Items: 10

1.

Internal hemorrhage

The presence of hemorrhage within the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
850720
Concept ID:
C1390214
Finding; Pathologic Function
2.

Severe postnatal growth retardation

Severely slow or limited growth after birth, being four standard deviations or more below age- and sex-related norms. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
501055
Concept ID:
CN007785
Finding
3.

Growth delay

A deficiency or slowing down of growth pre- and postnatally. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
500905
Concept ID:
CN001379
Finding
4.

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases that result in a progressive retinal degeneration affecting 1 in 3,000 to 5,000 people (Veltel et al., 2008). Symptoms include night blindness, the development of tunnel vision, and slowly progressive decreased central vision starting at approximately 20 years of age. Upon examination, patients have decreased visual acuity, constricted visual fields, dyschromatopsia (tritanopic; see 190900), and the classic fundus appearance with dark pigmentary clumps in the midperiphery and perivenous areas ('bone spicules'), attenuated retinal vessels, cystoid macular edema, fine pigmented vitreous cells, and waxy optic disc pallor. RP is associated with posterior subcapsular cataracts in 39 to 72% of patients, high myopia, astigmatism, keratoconus, and mild hearing loss in 30% of patients (excluding patients with Usher syndrome; see 276900). Fifty percent of female carriers of X-linked RP have a golden reflex in the posterior pole (summary by Kaiser et al., 2004). Juvenile Retinitis Pigmentosa Autosomal recessive childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting rod and cone photoreceptors simultaneously. The most severe cases are termed Leber congenital amaurosis (see 204000), whereas the less aggressive forms are usually considered juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (Gu et al., 1997). Autosomal recessive forms of juvenile retinitis pigmentosa can be caused by mutation in the SPATA7 (609868), LRAT (604863), and TULP1 (602280) genes (see LCA3, 604232, LCA14, 613341, and LCA15, 613843, respectively). An autosomal dominant form of juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (see 604393) is caused by mutation in the AIPL1 gene (604392). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
20551
Concept ID:
C0035334
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hemorrhage

Bleeding is the loss of blood. It can happen inside or outside the body. Bleeding can be a reaction to a cut or other wound. It can also result from an injury to internal organs. There are many situations in which you might bleed. A bruise is bleeding under the skin. Some strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain. Other bleeding, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, coughing up blood, or vaginal bleeding, can be a symptom of a disease. Normally, when you bleed, your blood forms clots to stop the bleeding. Severe bleeding may require first aid or a trip to the emergency room. If you have a bleeding disorder, your blood does not form clots normally.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5503
Concept ID:
C0019080
Finding; Pathologic Function
6.

Neural tube defect

Neural tube defects are the second most common type of birth defect after congenital heart defects. The 2 most common NTDs are open spina bifida, also known as spina bifida cystica (SBC) or myelomeningocele, and anencephaly (206500) (Detrait et al., 2005). Spina bifida occulta (SBO), a bony defect of the spine covered by normal skin, is a mild form of spina bifida that is often asymptomatic. The term 'spinal dysraphia' refers to both SBC and SBO (Botto et al., 1999; Fineman et al., 1982). The most severe neural tube defect, craniorachischisis (CRN), leaves the neural tube open from the midbrain or rostral hindbrain to the base of the spine (summary by Robinson et al., 2012). Neural tube defects represent a complex trait with multifactorial etiology encompassing both genetic and environmental components (summary by Bartsch et al., 2012 and Lei et al., 2014). An X-linked form of spina bifida has been suggested; see 301410. See also folate-sensitive neural tube defects (601634), which are caused by genes involved in folate metabolism. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
18009
Concept ID:
C0027794
Congenital Abnormality; Finding
7.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
Organism Function
8.

Multiple congenital anomalies

Congenital abnormalities that affect more than one organ or body structure. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7806
Concept ID:
C0000772
Congenital Abnormality
9.

Diastematomyelia

A rare congenital abnormality in which the spinal cord is split in half by fibrous or bony tissue. It may present as an isolated phenomenon or in association with spina bifida. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3801
Concept ID:
C0011999
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
10.

Crouzon syndrome

The eight disorders comprising the FGFR-related craniosynostosis spectrum are Pfeiffer syndrome, Apert syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, Beare-Stevenson syndrome, FGFR2-related isolated coronal synostosis, Jackson-Weiss syndrome, Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans (AN), and Muenke syndrome (isolated coronal synostosis caused by the p.Pro250Arg pathogenic variant in FGFR3). Muenke syndrome and FGFR2-related isolated coronal synostosis are characterized only by uni- or bicoronal craniosynostosis; the remainder are characterized by bicoronal craniosynostosis or cloverleaf skull, distinctive facial features, and variable hand and foot findings. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1162
Concept ID:
C0010273
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
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