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Items: 13

1.

Xeroderma pigmentosum

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals), with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years in most affected individuals; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21943
Concept ID:
C0043346
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Malignant melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma may also appear as a new mole. It may be black, abnormal, or ugly looking.. Thinking of ABCDE can help you remember what to watch for:. - Asymmetry - the shape of one half does not match the other. - Border - the edges are ragged, blurred or irregular. - Color - the color is uneven and may include shades of black, brown and tan. - Diameter - there is a change in size, usually an increase. -Evolving - the mole has changed over the past few weeks or months. Surgery is the first treatment of all stages of melanoma. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation, biologic, and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9944
Concept ID:
C0025202
Neoplastic Process
3.

Melanoma

The presence of a melanoma, a malignant cancer originating from pigment producing melanocytes. Melanoma can originate from the skin or the pigmented layers of the eye (the uvea). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505377
Concept ID:
CN002586
Finding
4.

Cutaneous malignant melanoma 1

Malignant melanoma is a neoplasm of pigment-producing cells called melanocytes that occurs most often in the skin, but may also occur in the eyes, ears, gastrointestinal tract, leptomeninges, and oral and genital mucous membranes (summary by Habif, 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma The locus for susceptibility to familial cutaneous malignant melanoma-1 (CMM1) has been mapped to chromosome 1p36. Other CMM susceptibility loci include CMM2 (155601), caused by variation in the CDKN2A gene (600160) on chromosome 9p21; CMM3 (609048), caused by variation in the CDK4 gene (123829) on chromosome 12q14; CMM4 (608035), mapped to chromosome 1p22; CMM5 (613099), caused by variation in the MC1R gene (155555) on chromosome 16q24; CMM6 (613972), caused by variation in the XRCC3 gene (600675) on chromosome 14q32; CMM7 (612263), mapped to chromosome 20q11; CMM8 (614456), caused by variation in the MITF gene (156845) on chromosome 3p13; CMM9 (615134), caused by variation in the TERT gene (187270) on chromosome 5p15; and CMM10 (615848), caused by mutation in the POT1 gene (606478) on chromosome 7q31. Somatic mutations causing malignant melanoma have also been identified in several genes, including BRAF (164757), STK11 (602216), PTEN (601728), TRRAP (603015), DCC (120470), GRIN2A (138253), ZNF831, BAP1 (603089), and RASA2 (601589). A large percentage of melanomas (40-60%) carry an activating somatic mutation in the BRAF gene, most often V600E (164757.0001) (Davies et al., 2002; Pollock et al., 2003). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320506
Concept ID:
C1835047
Finding; Neoplastic Process
5.

Malignant melanoma of skin

A primary melanoma arising from atypical melanocytes in the skin. Precursor lesions include acquired and congenital melanocytic nevi, and dysplastic nevi. Several histologic variants have been recognized, including superficial spreading melanoma, acral lentiginous melanoma, nodular melanoma, and lentigo maligna melanoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57486
Concept ID:
C0151779
Neoplastic Process
6.

Dystonia 3, torsion, X-linked

Individuals with X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) have dystonia of varying severity and parkinsonism. XDP afflicts primarily Filipino men and, rarely, women. The mean age of onset in men is 39 years; the clinical course is highly variable with parkinsonism as the initial presenting sign, overshadowed by dystonia as the disease progresses. Features of parkinsonism include resting tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, and severe shuffling gait. The dystonia develops focally, most commonly in the jaw, neck, trunk, and eyes, and less commonly in the limbs, tongue, pharynx, and larynx, the most characteristic being jaw dystonia often progressing to neck dystonia. Individuals with pure parkinsonism have non-disabling symptoms that are only slowly progressive; those who develop a combination of parkinsonism and dystonia can develop multifocal or generalized symptoms within a few years and die prematurely from pneumonia or intercurrent infections. Female carriers are mostly asymptomatic, though a small minority may manifest dystonia, parkinsonism, or chorea. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
326820
Concept ID:
C1839130
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Inflammation

A microscopic finding indicating the presence of acute, subacute or chronic inflammation in a tissue sample. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
8.

Cutaneous photosensitivity

increased sensitivity of the skin to light and other sources of UV [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
87601
Concept ID:
C0349506
Finding; Pathologic Function
9.

Neuroendocrine neoplasm

Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
64652
Concept ID:
C0206754
Neoplastic Process
10.

Neuroectodermal neoplasm

A neoplasm arising in the neuroectoderm, the portion of the ectoderm of the early embryo that gives rise to the central and peripheral nervous systems, including some glial cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
60072
Concept ID:
C0206093
Neoplastic Process
11.

Embryonal neoplasm

new abnormal embryonic tissue that grows by excessive cellular division and proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
45034
Concept ID:
C0027654
Neoplastic Process
12.

Nervous tissue neoplasm

A neoplasm derived from nervous tissue (not necessarity a neoplasm located in the nervous system). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
14324
Concept ID:
C0027665
Neoplastic Process
13.

Abnormality of the skin

An abnormality of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
11449
Concept ID:
C0037268
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
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