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Items: 19

1.

Partial adenosine deaminase deficiency

MedGen UID:
350862
Concept ID:
C1863239
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Severe combined immunodeficiency due to ADA deficiency

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a systemic purine metabolic disorder that primarily affects lymphocyte development, viability, and function. The clinical phenotypic spectrum includes: Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), often diagnosed by age six months and usually by age 12 months; Less severe "delayed" onset combined immune deficiency (CID), usually diagnosed between age one and ten years; "Late/adult onset" CID, diagnosed in the second to fourth decades; Benign "partial ADA deficiency" (very low or absent ADA activity in erythrocytes but greater ADA activity in nucleated cells), which is compatible with normal immune function. Infants with typical early-onset ADA-deficient SCID have failure to thrive and opportunistic infections associated with marked depletion of T, B, and NK lymphocytes, and an absence of both humoral and cellular immune function. If immune function is not restored, children with ADA-deficient SCID rarely survive beyond age one to two years. Infections in delayed- and late-onset types (commonly, recurrent otitis, sinusitis, and upper respiratory) may initially be less severe than those in individuals with ADA-deficient SCID; however, by the time of diagnosis these individuals often have chronic pulmonary insufficiency and may have autoimmune phenomena (cytopenias, anti-thyroid antibodies), allergies, and elevated serum concentration of IgE. The longer the disorder goes unrecognized, the more immune function deteriorates and the more likely are chronic sequelae of recurrent infection. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
354935
Concept ID:
C1863236
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Severe combined immunodeficiency disease

Severe combine immunodeficiency (SCID) is a primary immune deficiency that is characterized by a severe defect in both the T- and B-lymphocyte systems. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
88328
Concept ID:
C0085110
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Combined immunodeficiency

MedGen UID:
505803
Concept ID:
CN004782
Finding
6.

Severe combined immunodeficiency

Severe combine immunodeficiency (SCID) is a primary immune deficiency that is characterized by a severe defect in both the T- and B-lymphocyte systems. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505637
Concept ID:
CN003925
Finding
7.

Immunodeficiency due to defect in cd3-zeta

MedGen UID:
346666
Concept ID:
C1857798
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Cellular immunodeficiency

MedGen UID:
344444
Concept ID:
C1855204
Finding
9.

Combined immunodeficiency

A broad classification of inherited disorders presenting at birth that affect both the cell-mediated and humoral aspects of the immune response. Circulating numbers of B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and NK cells are variable but where present do not function properly. Susceptibility to infection is the primary concern. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141668
Concept ID:
C0494261
Disease or Syndrome
10.

CHARGE association

CHARGE is a mnemonic for coloboma, heart defects, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital abnormalities, and ear anomalies. CHARGE syndrome is characterized by the following: Unilateral or bilateral coloboma of the iris, retina-choroid, and/or disc with or without microphthalmos (80%-90% of individuals). Unilateral or bilateral choanal atresia or stenosis (50%-60%). Cranial nerve dysfunction resulting in hyposmia or anosmia, unilateral or bilateral facial palsy (40%), impaired hearing, and/or swallowing problems (70%-90%). Abnormal outer ears, ossicular malformations, Mondini defect of the cochlea and absent or hypoplastic semicircular canals (>90%). Cryptorchidism in males and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in both males and females. Developmental delay. Cardiovascular malformations (75%-85%). Growth deficiency (70%-80%). Orofacial clefts (15%-20%). Tracheoesophageal fistula (15%-20%). Neonates with CHARGE syndrome often have multiple life-threatening medical conditions. Feeding difficulties are a major cause of morbidity in all age groups. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75567
Concept ID:
C0265354
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
11.

Immunodeficiency

Syndromes in which there is a deficiency or defect in the mechanisms of immunity, either cellular or humoral. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7034
Concept ID:
C0021051
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Immune deficiency, familial variable

MedGen UID:
374426
Concept ID:
C1840266
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
880280

14.

Abnormal erythrocyte enzyme activity

An altered ability of any enzyme to act as catalysts within erythrocytes. This term includes changes due to altered levels of an enzyme. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
868154
Concept ID:
C4022545
Finding
15.

Common variable immunodeficiency 5

Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is a disorder that impairs the immune system. People with CVID are highly susceptible to infection from foreign invaders such as bacteria, or more rarely, viruses and often develop recurrent infections, particularly in the lungs, sinuses, and ears. Pneumonia is common in people with CVID. Over time, recurrent infections can lead to chronic lung disease. Affected individuals may also experience infection or inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, which can cause diarrhea and weight loss. Abnormal accumulation of immune cells causes enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) or an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) in some people with CVID. Immune cells can accumulate in other organs, forming small lumps called granulomas.Approximately 25 percent of people with CVID have an autoimmune disorder, which occurs when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's tissues and organs. The blood cells are most frequently affected by autoimmune attacks in CVID; the most commonly occurring autoimmune disorders are immune thrombocytopenia purpura, which is an abnormal bleeding disorder caused by a decrease in cell fragments involved in blood clotting called platelets, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which results in premature destruction of red blood cells. Other autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis can occur. Individuals with CVID also have a greater than normal risk of developing certain types of cancer, including a cancer of immune system cells called non-Hodgkin lymphoma and less frequently, stomach (gastric) cancer.People with CVID may start experiencing signs and symptoms of the disorder anytime between childhood and adulthood; most people with CVID are diagnosed in their twenties or thirties. The life expectancy of individuals with CVID varies depending on the severity and frequency of illnesses they experience. Most people with CVID live into adulthood.There are many different types of CVID that are distinguished by genetic cause. People with the same type of CVID may have varying signs and symptoms.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
462090
Concept ID:
C3150740
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Common variable immunodeficiency 4

Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is a disorder that impairs the immune system. People with CVID are highly susceptible to infection from foreign invaders such as bacteria, or more rarely, viruses and often develop recurrent infections, particularly in the lungs, sinuses, and ears. Pneumonia is common in people with CVID. Over time, recurrent infections can lead to chronic lung disease. Affected individuals may also experience infection or inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, which can cause diarrhea and weight loss. Abnormal accumulation of immune cells causes enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) or an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) in some people with CVID. Immune cells can accumulate in other organs, forming small lumps called granulomas.Approximately 25 percent of people with CVID have an autoimmune disorder, which occurs when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's tissues and organs. The blood cells are most frequently affected by autoimmune attacks in CVID; the most commonly occurring autoimmune disorders are immune thrombocytopenia purpura, which is an abnormal bleeding disorder caused by a decrease in cell fragments involved in blood clotting called platelets, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which results in premature destruction of red blood cells. Other autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis can occur. Individuals with CVID also have a greater than normal risk of developing certain types of cancer, including a cancer of immune system cells called non-Hodgkin lymphoma and less frequently, stomach (gastric) cancer.People with CVID may start experiencing signs and symptoms of the disorder anytime between childhood and adulthood; most people with CVID are diagnosed in their twenties or thirties. The life expectancy of individuals with CVID varies depending on the severity and frequency of illnesses they experience. Most people with CVID live into adulthood.There are many different types of CVID that are distinguished by genetic cause. People with the same type of CVID may have varying signs and symptoms.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
462089
Concept ID:
C3150739
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Common variable immunodeficiency 3

Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is a disorder that impairs the immune system. People with CVID are highly susceptible to infection from foreign invaders such as bacteria, or more rarely, viruses and often develop recurrent infections, particularly in the lungs, sinuses, and ears. Pneumonia is common in people with CVID. Over time, recurrent infections can lead to chronic lung disease. Affected individuals may also experience infection or inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, which can cause diarrhea and weight loss. Abnormal accumulation of immune cells causes enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) or an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) in some people with CVID. Immune cells can accumulate in other organs, forming small lumps called granulomas.Approximately 25 percent of people with CVID have an autoimmune disorder, which occurs when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's tissues and organs. The blood cells are most frequently affected by autoimmune attacks in CVID; the most commonly occurring autoimmune disorders are immune thrombocytopenia purpura, which is an abnormal bleeding disorder caused by a decrease in cell fragments involved in blood clotting called platelets, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which results in premature destruction of red blood cells. Other autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis can occur. Individuals with CVID also have a greater than normal risk of developing certain types of cancer, including a cancer of immune system cells called non-Hodgkin lymphoma and less frequently, stomach (gastric) cancer.People with CVID may start experiencing signs and symptoms of the disorder anytime between childhood and adulthood; most people with CVID are diagnosed in their twenties or thirties. The life expectancy of individuals with CVID varies depending on the severity and frequency of illnesses they experience. Most people with CVID live into adulthood.There are many different types of CVID that are distinguished by genetic cause. People with the same type of CVID may have varying signs and symptoms.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
462088
Concept ID:
C3150738
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Common variable immunodeficiency 1

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by antibody deficiency, hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent bacterial infections, and an inability to mount an antibody response to antigen. The defect results from a failure of B-cell differentiation and impaired secretion of immunoglobulins; the numbers of circulating B cells are usually in the normal range, but can be low. Most individuals with CVID have onset of infections after age 10 years. CVID represents the most common form of primary immunodeficiency disorders and is the most common form of primary antibody deficiency. Approximately 10 to 20% of patients with a diagnosis of CVID have a family history of the disorder (reviews by Chapel et al., 2008, Conley et al., 2009, and Yong et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Common Variable Immunodeficiency Common variable immunodeficiency is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See also CVID2 (240500), caused by mutation in the TACI gene (TNFRSF13B; 604907); CVID3 (613493), caused by mutation in the CD19 gene (107265); CVID4 (613494), caused by mutation in the BAFFR gene (TNFRSF13C; 606269); CVID5 (613495), caused by mutation in the CD20 gene (112210); CVID6 (613496), caused by mutation in the CD81 gene (186845); CVID7 (614699), caused by mutation in the CD21 gene (CR2; 120650); CVID8 (614700), caused by mutation in the LRBA gene (606453); CVID10 (615577), caused by mutation in the NFKB2 gene (164012); CVID11 (615767), caused by mutation in the IL21 gene (605384); CVID12 (616576), caused by mutation in the NFKB1 gene (164011); and CVID13 (616873), caused by mutation in the IKZF1 gene (603023). The disorder formerly designated CVID9 has been found to be a form of autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder; see ALPS3 (615559). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
460728
Concept ID:
C3149378
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Severe combined immunodeficiency, partial

MedGen UID:
355456
Concept ID:
C1865373
Disease or Syndrome
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