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Items: 18

1.

Chorea

Chorea (Greek for 'dance') refers to widespread arrhythmic involuntary movements of a forcible, jerky and restless fashion. It is a random-appearing sequence of one or more discrete involuntary movements or movement fragments. Movements appear random because of variability in timing, duration or location. Each movement may have a distinct start and end. However, movements may be strung together and thus may appear to flow randomly from one muscle group to another. Chorea can involve the trunk, neck, face, tongue, and extremities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3420
Concept ID:
C0008489
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Chorea

Chorea (Greek for 'dance') refers to widespread arrhythmic involuntary movements of a forcible, jerky and restless fashion. It is a random-appearing sequence of one or more discrete involuntary movements or movement fragments. Movements appear random because of variability in timing, duration or location. Each movement may have a distinct start and end. However, movements may be strung together and thus may appear to flow randomly from one muscle group to another. Chorea can involve the trunk, neck, face, tongue, and extremities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505081
Concept ID:
CN001874
Finding
3.

Acanthocytosis

MedGen UID:
350717
Concept ID:
C1862626
Finding
4.

Acanthocytosis

Acanthocytosis is a type of poikilocytosis characterized by the presence of spikes on the cell surface. The cells have an irregular shape resembling many-pointed stars. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
195801
Concept ID:
C0687751
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Choreoacanthocytosis

Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is characterized by a progressive movement disorder, cognitive and behavior changes, a myopathy that can be subclinical, and chronic hyperCKemia in serum. Although the disorder is named for acanthocytosis of the red blood cells, this feature is variable. The movement disorder is mostly limb chorea, but some individuals present with parkinsonism. Dystonia is common and affects the oral region and especially the tongue, causing dysarthria and serious dysphagia with resultant weight loss. Habitual tongue and lip biting are characteristic, as well as tongue protrusion dystonia. Progressive cognitive and behavioral changes resemble those in a frontal lobe syndrome. Seizures are observed in almost half of affected individuals and can be the initial manifestation. Myopathy results in progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness. Mean age of onset in ChAc is about 30 years, although ChAc can develop as early as the first decade or as late as the seventh decade. It runs a chronic progressive course and may lead to major disability within a few years. Life expectancy is reduced, with age of death ranging from 28 to 61 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98277
Concept ID:
C0393576
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Abetalipoproteinaemia

Abetalipoproteinemia and familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FBHL; 615558) are rare diseases characterized by hypocholesterolemia and malabsorption of lipid-soluble vitamins leading to retinal degeneration, neuropathy, and coagulopathy. Hepatic steatosis is also common. The root cause of both disorders is improper packaging and secretion of apolipoprotein B-containing particles. Obligate heterozygous parents of ABL patients usually have normal lipids consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance, whereas obligate heterozygous parents of FBHL patients typically have half normal levels of apoB-containing lipoproteins consistent with autosomal codominant inheritance (summary by Lee and Hegele, 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1253
Concept ID:
C0000744
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Neurologic

MedGen UID:
880863
Concept ID:
CN236425
Finding
8.

Huntington chorea

Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive disorder of motor, cognitive, and psychiatric disturbances. The mean age of onset is 35 to 44 years and the median survival time is 15 to 18 years after onset. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5654
Concept ID:
C0020179
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Paroxysmal dyskinesia

Episodic bouts of involuntary movements with dystonic, choreic, ballistic movements, or a combination thereof. There is no loss of consciousness during the attacks. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
156242
Concept ID:
C0752210
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Asterixis

A clinical sign indicating a lapse of posture and is usually manifest by a bilateral flapping tremor at the wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and hip joints. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
115916
Concept ID:
C0232766
Sign or Symptom
11.

Hemiballismus

Hemiballismus is a rare movement disorder that is caused primarily by damage to various areas in the basal ganglia. Hemiballismus is usually characterized by involuntary flinging motions of the extremities. The movements are often violent and have wide amplitudes of motion. They are continuous and random and can involve proximal and/or distal muscles on one side of the body, while some cases even include the facial muscles. The more a patient is active, the more the movements increase. With relaxation comes a decrease in movements. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
67443
Concept ID:
C0221169
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
12.

Dysphagia

If you have a swallowing disorder, you may have difficulty or pain when swallowing. Some people cannot swallow at all. Others may have trouble swallowing liquids, foods, or saliva. This makes it hard to eat. Often, it can be difficult to take in enough calories and fluids to nourish your body. Anyone can have a swallowing disorder, but it is more likely in the elderly. It often happens because of other conditions, including. - Nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and cerebral palsy. - Problems with your esophagus, including GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). - Stroke. - Head or spinal cord injury. - Cancer of the head, neck, or esophagus. Medicines can help some people, while others may need surgery. Swallowing treatment with a speech-language pathologist can help. You may find it helpful to change your diet or hold your head or neck in a certain way when you eat. In very serious cases, people may need feeding tubes. NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41440
Concept ID:
C0011168
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Movement disorders

Imagine if parts of your body moved when you didn't want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia is abnormal uncontrolled movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. . Nerve diseases cause many movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. Other causes include injuries, autoimmune diseases, infections and certain medicines. Many movement disorders are inherited, which means they run in families. Treatment varies by disorder. Medicine can cure some disorders. Others get better when an underlying disease is treated. Often, however, there is no cure. In that case, the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms and relieve pain.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10113
Concept ID:
C0026650
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Dyskinesia

A movement disorder which consists of effects including diminished voluntary movements and the presence of involuntary movements. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
8514
Concept ID:
C0013384
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Athetosis

Athetosis (from the Greek word for 'changeable' or 'unfixed') refers to an inability to sustain the muscles of the fingers, toes, tongue, or any other group of muscles in a fixed position. Instead, posture is interrupted by slow, purposeless involuntary movements. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505190
Concept ID:
CN002093
Finding
16.

Abnormality of creatine metabolism

An anomaly of the concentration or homeostasis of creatine. Creatine is a derivative of glycine having methyl and amidino groups attached to the nitrogen. Creatine is naturally produced from amino acids, primarily in liver and kidney, and acts as an energy source for cells, primarly for muscle cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
866482
Concept ID:
C4020731
Finding
17.

Abnormal levels of creatine kinase in blood

MedGen UID:
808291
Concept ID:
CN221676
Finding
18.

Abnormality of creatine metabolism

An anomaly of the concentration or homeostasis of creatine. Creatine is a derivative of glycine having methyl and amidino groups attached to the nitrogen. Creatine is naturally produced from amino acids, primarily in liver and kidney, and acts as an energy source for cells, primarly for muscle cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
489622
Concept ID:
CN167839
Finding
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