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Items: 19

1.

Proportionate short stature; mild intellectual disability; dysmorphic facial features; precocious puberty

MedGen UID:
850705
Concept ID:
CN231399
Finding
2.

Erythroderma

An inflammatory exfoliative dermatosis involving nearly all of the surface of the skin. Erythroderma develops suddenly. A patchy erythema may generalize and spread to affect most of the skin. Scaling may appear in 2-6 days and be accompanied by hot, red, dry skin, malaise, and fever. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504688
Concept ID:
CN000955
Finding
3.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Chondrodysplasia punctata 2 X-linked dominant

The findings in X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 (CDPX2) range from fetal demise with multiple malformations and severe growth retardation to much milder manifestations, including adults with no recognizable physical abnormalities. At least 95% of liveborn individuals with CDPX2 are female with the following findings: Growth deficiency/short stature. Distinctive craniofacial appearance. Skeletal changes: stippling (chondrodysplasia punctate) on x-rays of the epiphyses of the long bones and vertebrae, the trachea and distal ends of the ribs seen in children prior to completion of normal epiphyseal ossification; rhizomelic (i.e., proximal) shortening of limbs that is often asymmetric; scoliosis. Ectodermal changes: linear or blotchy scaling ichthyosis in the newborn that usually resolves in the first months of life leaving linear or whorled atrophic patches involving hair follicles (follicular atrophoderma); coarse hair with scarring alopecia; occasional flattened or split nails; normal teeth. Ocular changes: cataracts; microphthalmia and/or microcornea. Intellect is usually normal. Rarely affected males have been identified with a phenotype that includes: hypotonia; moderate to profound developmental delay; seizures; cerebellar (primarily vermis) hypoplasia and/or Dandy-Walker variant; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
79381
Concept ID:
C0282102
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Alopecia

You lose up to 100 hairs from your scalp every day. That's normal, and in most people, those hairs grow back. But many men -- and some women -- lose hair as they grow older. You can also lose your hair if you have certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes, or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history, or poor nutrition. . Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying cause will correct the problem. Other treatments include medicines and hair restoration. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7982
Concept ID:
C0002170
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
6.

Chondrodysplasia punctata

A rare congenital developmental disorder characterized by the presence of stippled foci of calcification in the hyaline cartilage, joint contractions, mental retardation and ichthyosis. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3052
Concept ID:
C0008445
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
7.

Coarse hair

Hair shafts are rough in texture. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505157
Concept ID:
CN002002
Finding
8.

Frontal bossing

Bilateral bulging of the lateral frontal bone prominences with relative sparing of the midline. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505049
Concept ID:
CN001816
Finding
9.

Short stature, idiopathic, X-linked

Idiopathic short stature is usually defined as a height below the third percentile for chronological age or minus 2 standard deviations (SD) of national height standards in the absence of specific causative disorders (Rao et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of quantitative trait loci for stature, see STQTL1 (606255). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375584
Concept ID:
C1845118
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
10.

Cataract

MedGen UID:
368085
Concept ID:
C1962983
Finding; Pathologic Function
11.

Growth control, Y-chromosome influenced

MedGen UID:
358267
Concept ID:
C1868676
Finding
12.

Short stature, idiopathic, autosomal

MedGen UID:
346958
Concept ID:
C1858656
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Short stature

Height greater than two standard deviations below the mean of the appropriate reference population for the age and sex of the individual. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
14.

Congenital alopecia X-linked

A congenital condition characterized by the absence of hair on the scalp or entire body. The lack of hair is rarely absolute and is usually accompanied by incompletely grown, lanugo-like hair. It affects males twice as much as females and a familial tendency is common. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
78581
Concept ID:
C0265992
Congenital Abnormality
15.

Cataract

A cataract is a clouding of the lens in your eye. It affects your vision. Cataracts are very common in older people. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. A cataract can occur in either or both eyes. It cannot spread from one eye to the other. Common symptoms are. -Blurry vision. -Colors that seem faded. -Glare - headlights, lamps or sunlight may seem too bright. You may also see a halo around lights. -Not being able to see well at night. -Double vision . -Frequent prescription changes in your eye wear . Cataracts usually develop slowly. New glasses, brighter lighting, anti-glare sunglasses or magnifying lenses can help at first. Surgery is also an option. It involves removing the cloudy lens and replacing it with an artificial lens. Wearing sunglasses and a hat with a brim to block ultraviolet sunlight may help to delay cataracts. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
39462
Concept ID:
C0086543
Acquired Abnormality; Finding; Finding
16.

Osteochondrodysplasia

A general term describing features characterized by abnormal development of bones and connective tissues. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
10495
Concept ID:
C0029422
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
17.

Inflammatory abnormality of the skin

The presence of inflammation of the skin. That is, an abnormality of the skin resulting from the local accumulation of fluid, plasma proteins, and leukocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
4233
Concept ID:
C0011603
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Leukoencephalopathy with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia

MedGen UID:
373499
Concept ID:
C1970840
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Psoriasiform dermatitis

Any one of a number of inflammatory skin conditions that resemble psoriasis because of their papular and scaly appearance.(AE) [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
75508
Concept ID:
C0262985
Disease or Syndrome
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