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Items: 20

1.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Frequency

MedGen UID:
91210
Concept ID:
C0376249
Quantitative Concept
3.

Insulin resistance

Increased resistance towards insulin, that is, diminished effectiveness of insulin in reducing blood glucose levels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
43904
Concept ID:
C0021655
Pathologic Function
4.

Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including. -Coronary artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your heart. When they are blocked, you can suffer angina or a heart attack. -Carotid artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your brain. When they are blocked you can suffer a stroke. -Peripheral arterial disease. These arteries are in your arms, legs and pelvis. When they are blocked, you can suffer from numbness, pain and sometimes infections. Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency. A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
13948
Concept ID:
C0004153
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Insulin resistance

Increased resistance towards insulin, that is, diminished effectiveness of insulin in reducing blood glucose levels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504630
Concept ID:
CN000801
Finding
7.

Abnormality of the cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427888
Concept ID:
CN001481
Finding
8.

Deafness-hypogonadism syndrome

MedGen UID:
335003
Concept ID:
C1844680
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Xerocytosis

Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS), also known as hereditary xerocytosis, is an autosomal dominant hemolytic anemia characterized by primary erythrocyte dehydration. DHS erythrocytes exhibit decreased total cation and potassium content that are not accompanied by a proportional net gain of sodium and water. DHS patients typically exhibit mild to moderate compensated hemolytic anemia, with an increased erythrocyte mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and a decreased osmotic fragility, both of which reflect cellular dehydration (summary by Zarychanski et al., 2012). Patients may also show perinatal edema and pseudohyperkalemia due to loss of K+ from red cells stored at room temperature. A minor proportion of red cells appear as stomatocytes on blood films. Complications such as splenomegaly and cholelithiasis, resulting from increased red cell trapping in the spleen and elevated bilirubin levels, respectively, may occur. The course of DHS is frequently associated with iron overload, which may lead to hepatosiderosis (summary by Albuisson et al., 2013). The 'leaky red blood cells' in familial pseudohyperkalemia show a temperature-dependent loss of potassium when stored at room temperature, manifesting as apparent hyperkalemia. The red blood cells show a reduced life span in vivo, but there is no frank hemolysis. Studies of cation content and transport show a marginal increase in permeability at 37 degrees C and a degree of cellular dehydration, qualitatively similar to the changes seen in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. Physiologic studies show that the passive leak of potassium has an abnormal temperature dependence, such that the leak is less sensitive to temperature than that in normal cells (summary by Iolascon et al., 1999). Carella et al. (2004) noted that 3 clinical forms of pseudohyperkalemia unassociated with hematologic manifestations, based predominantly on the leak-temperature dependence curve, had been reported: (1) pseudohyperkalemia Edinburgh, in which the curve has a shallow slope; (2) pseudohyperkalemia Chiswick or Falkirk (see 609153), in which the curve is shouldered; and (3) pseudohyperkalemia Cardiff (see 609153), in which the temperature dependence of the leak shows a 'U-shaped' profile with a minimum at 23 degrees C. Gore et al. (2004) stated that potassium-flux temperature profiles are consistent both from year to year in an individual as well as consistent within affected members of a pedigree. Genetic Heterogeneity of Hereditary Stomatocytosis Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis-2 (DHS2; 616689) is caused by mutation in the KCNN4 gene (602754) on chromosome 19q13. Another form of stomatocytosis, involving familial pseudohyperkalemia with minimal hematologic abnormalities (PSHK2; 609153), is caused by mutation in the ABCB6 gene (605452) on chromosome 2q35. Cryohydrocytosis (CHC; 185020) is caused by mutation in the SLC4A1 gene (109270) on chromosome 17q21, and stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis with neurologic defects (SDCHCN; 608885) is caused by mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (138140) on chromosome 1p34. An overhydrated form of hereditary stomatocytosis (OHST; 185000) is caused by mutation in the RHAG gene (180297) on chromosome 6p12. See 137280 for a discussion of the association of familial stomatocytosis and hypertrophic gastritis in the dog, an autosomal recessive syndrome. Reviews Delaunay (2004) reviewed genetic disorders of red cell membrane permeability to monovalent cations, noting 'inevitable' overlap between entities based on clinical phenotype. Bruce (2009) provided a review of hereditary stomatocytosis and cation-leaky red cells, stating that consistent features include hemolytic anemia, a monovalent cation leak, and changes in red cell morphology that appear to follow a continuum, from normal discocyte to stomatocyte to echinocyte in DHS, and from discocyte to stomatocyte to spherocyte to fragmentation in OHST. Bruce (2009) suggested that the underlying pathologic mechanism might involve misfolded mutant proteins that escape the quality control system of the cell and reach the red cell membrane, where they disrupt the red cell membrane structure and cause a cation leak that alters the hydration of the red cell, thereby changing the morphology and viability of the cell. King and Zanella (2013) provided an overview of 2 groups of nonimmune hereditary red cell membrane disorders caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane: red cell cytoskeleton disorders, including hereditary spherocytosis (see 182900), hereditary elliptocytosis (see 611804), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (266140); and cation permeability disorders of the red cell membrane, or hereditary stomatocytoses, including DHS, OHST, CHC, and PSHK. The authors noted that because there is no specific screening test for the hereditary stomatocytoses, a preliminary diagnosis is based on the presence of a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature- or time-dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. King et al. (2015) reported the International Council for Standardization in Haematology (ICSH) guidelines for laboratory diagnosis of nonimmune hereditary red cell membrane disorders. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
124415
Concept ID:
C0272051
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
10.

Diabetes mellitus type 2

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include. -Being very thirsty. -Urinating often. -Feeling very hungry or tired. -Losing weight without trying. -Having sores that heal slowly. -Having blurry eyesight. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41523
Concept ID:
C0011860
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
13.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hyperinsulinemia

Abnormally high levels of insulin in the blood.(AE) [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
43779
Concept ID:
C0020459
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
15.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8350
Concept ID:
C0011849
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Arteriosclerosis

Sclerosis (hardening) of the arteries with increased thickness of the wall of arteries as well as increased stiffness and a loss of elasticity. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2076
Concept ID:
C0003850
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Obesity, variation in

MedGen UID:
865611
Concept ID:
C4017174
Finding
20.

Hypoargininemia

A decreased concentration of arginine in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
395333
Concept ID:
C1859735
Finding
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