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Items: 1 to 20 of 22

1.

Insulin resistance

Increased resistance towards insulin, that is, diminished effectiveness of insulin in reducing blood glucose levels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
43904
Concept ID:
C0021655
Pathologic Function
2.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8350
Concept ID:
C0011849
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cholesterol gallstones

Gallstones composed primarily of cholesterol, usually about 2-3 cm in length with an oval form and a yellow or green/brown color. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506637
Concept ID:
CN167706
Finding
5.

Decreased body weight

MedGen UID:
505609
Concept ID:
CN003826
Finding
6.

Cholelithiasis

Hard, pebble-like deposits that form within the gallbladder. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504715
Concept ID:
CN001014
Finding
7.

Insulin resistance

Increased resistance towards insulin, that is, diminished effectiveness of insulin in reducing blood glucose levels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504630
Concept ID:
CN000801
Finding
8.

Diabetes mellitus

A group of abnormalities characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504609
Concept ID:
CN000766
Finding
9.

Cholesterol gallstones

Gallstones composed primarily of cholesterol, usually about 2-3 cm in length with an oval form and a yellow or green/brown color. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
488946
Concept ID:
C0856727
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Primary cortisol resistance

MedGen UID:
443921
Concept ID:
C2930863
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
12.

Metabolic syndrome X

A clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose levels is sometimes called metabolic syndrome X (Reaven, 1988) or abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome (Bjorntorp, 1991). The syndrome may affect nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults and is considered a veritable epidemic (Ford et al., 2002). It is a major risk factor for both diabetes mellitus (see 125853 and Haffner et al., 1992) and cardiovascular disease (Isomaa et al., 2001). The etiology is complex, determined by the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence varies substantially among ethnic groups, with the highest rates in Mexican American women (Park et al., 2003). Other factors influencing the metabolic syndrome include age, smoking, alcohol, diet, and physical inactivity. Genetic Heterogeneity of Abdominal Obesity-Metabolic Syndrome AOMS2 (605572) has been mapped to chromosome 17p12. AOMS3 (615812) is caused by mutation in the DYRK1B gene (604556) on chromosome 19q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
99356
Concept ID:
C0524620
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Cholelithiasis

Your gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ under your liver. It stores bile, a fluid made by your liver to digest fat. As your stomach and intestines digest food, your gallbladder releases bile through a tube called the common bile duct. The duct connects your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Your gallbladder is most likely to give you trouble if something blocks the flow of bile through the bile ducts. That is usually a gallstone. Gallstones form when substances in bile harden. Gallstone attacks usually happen after you eat. Signs of a gallstone attack may include nausea, vomiting, or pain in the abdomen, back, or just under the right arm. Gallstones are most common among older adults, women, overweight people, Native Americans and Mexican Americans. The most common treatment is removal of the gallbladder. Fortunately, the gallbladder is an organ that you can live without. Bile has other ways to reach your small intestine. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3039
Concept ID:
C0008350
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Hyperinsulinemia

Abnormally high levels of insulin in the blood.(AE) [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
43779
Concept ID:
C0020459
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
16.

Disorder of digestive system

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Disorder of biliary tract

An abnormality of the biliary tree. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
565
Concept ID:
C0005424
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Gallbladder disease 2

MedGen UID:
372160
Concept ID:
C1835925
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Gallbladder disease 4

MedGen UID:
370601
Concept ID:
C1969115
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Fasting hyperinsulinemia

An increased concentration of insulin in the blood in the fasting state, i.e., not as the response to food intake. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
351259
Concept ID:
C1864954
Finding
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