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Items: 13

1.

Stroke

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. Mini-strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted. Symptoms of stroke are . -Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body). -Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech. -Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes. -Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination. -Sudden severe headache with no known cause. If you have any of these symptoms, you must get to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is happening by quickly dissolving the blood clot or by stopping the bleeding. Post-stroke rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment for stroke. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
52522
Concept ID:
C0038454
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Renal artery stenosis

The presence of stenosis of the renal artery. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
19727
Concept ID:
C0035067
Anatomical Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including. -Coronary artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your heart. When they are blocked, you can suffer angina or a heart attack. -Carotid artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your brain. When they are blocked you can suffer a stroke. -Peripheral arterial disease. These arteries are in your arms, legs and pelvis. When they are blocked, you can suffer from numbness, pain and sometimes infections. Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency. A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
13948
Concept ID:
C0004153
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cerebral artery atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis (HP:0002621) of a cerebral artery. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
870478
Concept ID:
C4024924
Anatomical Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
5.

Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis

MedGen UID:
573799
Concept ID:
C0340557
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Ischemic stroke

MedGen UID:
505123
Concept ID:
CN001939
Finding
7.

Stroke

MedGen UID:
340407
Concept ID:
C1849743
8.

Stenosis

The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
224710
Concept ID:
C1261287
Pathologic Function
9.

Ischemic stroke

A stroke is an acute neurologic event leading to death of neural tissue of the brain and resulting in loss of motor, sensory and/or cognitive function. It is said to be the third leading cause of death in the United States. Gunel and Lifton (1996) noted that about 20% of strokes are hemorrhagic, resulting in bleeding into the brain. Ischemic strokes, resulting from vascular occlusion, account for the majority of strokes. Bersano et al. (2008) reviewed genetic polymorphisms that have been implicated in the development of stroke. Candidate genes include those involved in hemostasis (see, e.g., F5; 612309), the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (see, e.g., ACE; 106180), homocysteine (see, e.g., MTHFR; 607093), and lipoprotein metabolism (see, e.g., APOE; 107741). See also hemorrhagic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH; 614519). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
215292
Concept ID:
C0948008
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Renal Artery Obstruction

blocking or clogging of the renal artery, which is the branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
48406
Concept ID:
C0035066
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Asplenia, isolated congenital

Isolated congenital asplenia is a rare cause of primary immunodeficiency. Most affected individuals die of severe bacterial infections in early childhood. Isolated asplenia is distinct from asplenia associated with other complex visceral defects, notably heterotaxy syndromes such as Ivemark syndrome (208530) (summary by Mahlaoui et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
341378
Concept ID:
C1849084
12.

Splenic Hypoplasia

MedGen UID:
151935
Concept ID:
C0685889
Congenital Abnormality
13.

Cerebral atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis of the cerebral vasculature. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
40189
Concept ID:
C0007775
Disease or Syndrome
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