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Items: 1 to 20 of 39

1.

Left ventricular noncompaction

MedGen UID:
910815
Concept ID:
CN241415
Finding
2.

Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy

An uncommon congenital abnormality where the left ventricular myocardium fails to compact during embryonic development, leading to cardiomyopathy with a variable degree of ventricular dysfunction. There is genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic variability. Characteristically, there are typically deep trabeculations in the noncompacted area, with varying proportions of the LV myocardium compacted. LV noncompaction is associated with rhythm abnormalities including Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, conduction defects, and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
866782
Concept ID:
C4021133
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Left

Being located on the left side of the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
618170
Concept ID:
C0443246
Spatial Concept
4.

Cardiomyopathy

A myocardial disorder in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504883
Concept ID:
CN001491
Finding
5.

Left ventricular noncompaction

Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is defined by 3 markers: prominent left ventricular (LV) trabeculae, deep intertrabecular recesses, and the thin compacted layer. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
450531
Concept ID:
C1960469
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Noncompaction cardiomyopathy

A type of cardiomyopathy characterized anatomically by deep trabeculations in the ventricular wall, which define recesses communicating with the main ventricular chamber. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
326592
Concept ID:
C1839832
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
7.

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have it. In others, however, it can make the heart less able to pump blood through the body. This can cause serious complications, including . - Heart failure . - Abnormal heart rhythms . - Heart valve problems. - Sudden cardiac arrest. Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy run in families. In many people, however, the cause is unknown. Treatment might involve medicines, surgery, other medical procedures, and lifestyle changes. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
209232
Concept ID:
C0878544
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Heart failure

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart is not able to pump blood the way it should. It can affect one or both sides of the heart. The weakening of the heart's pumping ability causes. -Blood and fluid to back up into the lungs. -The buildup of fluid in the feet, ankles and legs - called edema. -Tiredness and shortness of breath. Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have had a heart attack. Men have a higher rate of heart failure than women. Your doctor will diagnose heart failure by doing a physical exam and heart tests. Treatment includes treating the underlying cause of your heart failure, medicines, and heart transplantation if other treatments fail. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6749
Concept ID:
C0018801
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Heart Failure

MedGen UID:
880986
Concept ID:
CN236639
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Flax-dressers disease

MedGen UID:
745741
Concept ID:
C2242894
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Stokvis disease

MedGen UID:
543810
Concept ID:
C0272104
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Kuess disease

MedGen UID:
540800
Concept ID:
C0267583
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Feather-pickers disease

MedGen UID:
538598
Concept ID:
C0264481
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Grain-handlers disease

MedGen UID:
538595
Concept ID:
C0264477
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Autosomal dominant inheritance

Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Genetic Function; Intellectual Product
17.

Asymptomatic

The finding of no indications of a particular disease or injury. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
65413
Concept ID:
C0231221
Finding
18.

Budgerigar-fanciers disease

MedGen UID:
39141
Concept ID:
C0085931
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Congestive heart failure

The presence of an abnormality of cardiac function that is responsible for the failure of the heart to pump blood at a rate that is commensurate with the needs of the tissues or a state in which abnormally elevated filling pressures are required for the heart to do so. Heart failure is frequently related to a defect in myocardial contraction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
9169
Concept ID:
C0018802
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Murine

MedGen UID:
108834
Concept ID:
C0591833
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
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