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Items: 1 to 20 of 31

1.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
2.

Bronchiectasis

Persistent abnormal dilatation of the bronchi. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14234
Concept ID:
C0006267
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Furriers lung

MedGen UID:
538594
Concept ID:
C0264476
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Coffee-workers lung

MedGen UID:
538589
Concept ID:
C0264468
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Malt-workers lung

MedGen UID:
510125
Concept ID:
C0155888
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Cheese-washers lung

MedGen UID:
507549
Concept ID:
C0007969
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Bronchiectasis

Persistent abnormal dilatation of the bronchi owing to localized and irreversible destruction and widening of the large airways. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505109
Concept ID:
CN001911
Finding
8.

Chronic

Slow, creeping onset, slow progress and long continuance of disease manifestations. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104657
Concept ID:
C0205191
Temporal Concept
9.

Inflammation

A localized protective response resulting from injury or destruction of tissues. Inflammation serves to destroy, dilute, or wall off both the injurious agent and the injured tissue. In the acute phase, inflammation is characterized by the signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function. Histologically, inflammation involves a complex series of events, including dilatation of arterioles, capillaries, and venules, with increased permeability and blood flow; exudation of fluids, including plasma proteins; and leukocyte migration into the site of inflammation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
10.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Autoimmune state

Process whereby the immune system reacts against the body's own tissues. Autoimmunity may produce or be caused by AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2136
Concept ID:
C0004368
Pathologic Function
12.

Flax-dressers disease

MedGen UID:
745741
Concept ID:
C2242894
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Stokvis disease

MedGen UID:
543810
Concept ID:
C0272104
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Kuess disease

MedGen UID:
540800
Concept ID:
C0267583
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Feather-pickers disease

MedGen UID:
538598
Concept ID:
C0264481
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Grain-handlers disease

MedGen UID:
538595
Concept ID:
C0264477
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Autoimmunity

The occurrence of an immune reaction against the organism's own cells or tissues. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505423
Concept ID:
CN002679
Finding
18.

Autoimmune reaction

A specific humoral or cell-mediated immune response against autologous (self) antigens. An autoimmune process may produce or be caused by autoimmune disease and may be developmentally complex, not necessarily pathological, and possibly pervasive. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105217
Concept ID:
C0443146
Pathologic Function
19.

Budgerigar-fanciers disease

MedGen UID:
39141
Concept ID:
C0085931
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
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