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1.

History/symptoms

MedGen UID:
628890
Concept ID:
C0455980
Finding
2.

Clinical finding

clinical manifestations that can be either objective when observed by a physician, or subjective when perceived by the patient. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
19974
Concept ID:
C0037088
Sign or Symptom
3.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
4.

Female pelvic inflammatory disease

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring in these organs. This can lead to infertility, ectopic pregnancy, pelvic pain, abscesses, and other serious problems. PID is the most common preventable cause of infertility in the United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other bacteria can also cause it. You are at greater risk if you. -Are sexually active and younger than 25. -Have more than one sex partner. -Douche. Some women have no symptoms. Others have pain in the lower abdomen, fever, smelly vaginal discharge, irregular bleeding, and pain during intercourse or urination. Doctors diagnose PID with a physical exam, lab tests, and imaging tests. Antibiotics can cure PID. Early treatment is important. Waiting too long increases the risk of infertility. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
66845
Concept ID:
C0242172
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Diagnosis

Description:The source act is intended to help establish the presence of a (an adverse) situation described by the target act. This is not limited to diseases but can apply to any adverse situation or condition of medical or technical nature.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
6.

Infections

MedGen UID:
678472
Concept ID:
C0851162
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Chlamydia trachomatis infection

MedGen UID:
636010
Concept ID:
C0518948
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Positive

A presence finding of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign based on the established threshold of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
254858
Concept ID:
C1446409
Finding
9.

Cervicitis

Inflammation of the uterine cervix. [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
3338
Concept ID:
C0007860
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Male Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318601
Concept ID:
C1720894
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Female Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318599
Concept ID:
C1720887
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications

Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT, the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE), and disorders related to PREGNANCY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318565
Concept ID:
C1720765
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Disease due to Gram-negative bacteria

Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88406
Concept ID:
C0085423
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Infection of pelvis

Infection involving the tissues or organs in the PELVIS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45366
Concept ID:
C0030790
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Neisseriaceae Infections

Infections with bacteria of the family NEISSERIACEAE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
43166
Concept ID:
C0085396
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Disorder of male genital organ

Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42195
Concept ID:
C0017412
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Chlamydial infection

What is chlamydia? Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease. It is caused by bacteria called Chlamydia trachomatis. It can infect both men and women. Women can get chlamydia in the cervix, rectum, or throat. Men can get chlamydia in the urethra (inside the penis), rectum, or throat. How do you get chlamydia? You can get chlamydia during oral, vaginal, or anal sex with someone who has the infection. A woman can also pass chlamydia to her baby during childbirth. If you've had chlamydia and were treated in the past, you can get re-infected if you have unprotected sex with someone who has it. Who is at risk of getting chlamydia? Chlamydia is more common in young people, especially young women. You are more likely to get it if you don't consistently use a condom, or if you have multiple partners. What are the symptoms of chlamydia? Chlamydia doesn't usually cause any symptoms. So you may not realize that you have it. People with chlamydia who have no symptoms can still pass the disease to others. If you do have symptoms, they may not appear until several weeks after you have sex with an infected partner. Symptoms in women include. -Abnormal vaginal discharge, which may have a strong smell. -A burning sensation when urinating. -Pain during intercourse. If the infection spreads, you might get lower abdominal pain, pain during sex, nausea, or fever. Symptoms in men include. -Discharge from your penis. -A burning sensation when urinating. -Burning or itching around the opening of your penis. -Pain and swelling in one or both testicles (although this is less common). If the chlamydia infects the rectum (in men or women), it can cause rectal pain, discharge, and/or bleeding. How do I know if I have chlamydia? There are lab tests to diagnose chlamydia. Your health care provider may ask you to provide a urine sample. For women, providers sometimes use (or ask you to use) a cotton swab to get a sample from your vagina to test for chlamydia. Who should be tested for chlamydia? You should go to your health provider for a test if you have symptoms of chlamydia, or if you have a partner who has a sexually transmitted disease. Pregnant women should get a test when they go to their first prenatal visit. People at higher risk should get checked for chlamydia every year:. -Sexually active women 25 and younger. -Older women who have new or multiple sex partners, or a sex partner who has a sexually transmitted disease. -Men who have sex with men (MSM). What are the complications of chlamydia? In women, an untreated infection can spread to your uterus and fallopian tubes, causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID can cause permanent damage to your reproductive system. This can lead to long-term pelvic pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy. Women who have had chlamydia infections more than once are at higher risk of serious reproductive health complications. Men often don't have health problems from chlamydia. Sometimes it can infect the epididymis (the tube that carries sperm). This can cause pain, fever, and, rarely, infertility. Both men and women can develop reactive arthritis because of a chlamydia infection. Reactive arthritis is a type of arthritis that happens as a reaction to an infection in the body. Babies born to infected mothers can get eye infections and pneumonia from chlamydia. It may also make it more likely for your baby to be born too early. Untreated chlamydia may also increase your chances of getting or giving HIV/AIDS. What are the treatments for chlamydia? Antibiotics will cure the infection. You may get a one-time dose of the antibiotics, or you may need to take medicine every day for 7 days. Antibiotics cannot repair any permanent damage that the disease has caused. To prevent spreading the disease to your partner, you should not have sex until the infection has cleared up. If you got a one-time dose of antibiotics, you should wait 7 days after taking the medicine to have sex again. If you have to take medicine every day for 7 days, you should not have sex again until you have finished taking all of the doses of your medicine. It is common to get a repeat infection, so you should get tested again about three months after treatment. Can I prevent chlamydia? The only sure way to prevent chlamydia is to not have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading chlamydia. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
40237
Concept ID:
C0008149
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Disorder of uterus

The uterus, or womb, is the place where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The first sign of a problem with the uterus may be bleeding between periods or after sex. Causes can include hormones, thyroid problems, fibroids, polyps, cancer, infection, or pregnancy. Treatment depends on the cause. Sometimes birth control pills treat hormonal imbalances. If a thyroid problem is the cause, treating it may also stop the bleeding. If you have cancer or hyperplasia, an overgrowth of normal cells in the uterus, you may need surgery. With two other uterine problems, tissue that normally lines the uterus grows where it is not supposed to. In endometriosis, it grows outside the uterus. In adenomyosis, it grows in the uterus's outside walls. Pain medicine may help. Other treatments include hormones and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22590
Concept ID:
C0042131
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial

Bacterial diseases transmitted or propagated by sexual conduct. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
20728
Concept ID:
C0036917
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
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